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Topic: Best Long Sleeve "Moisture Mover" Baselayer?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 06 2014, 7:28 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi,

I'm looking for the best long sleeve "moisture mover" baselayer top. I think I've narrowed it down to 3 choices, but I'm open to suggestions.

1. Arcteryx Phase AR: http://arcteryx.com/product....Crew-LS

2. Craft Active Extreme & Active Extreme Concept: http://shop.craftsports.us/active-extreme-crewneck-mens-31790.html and http://shop.craftsports.us/active-....84.html

3. Rab MeCo 120 (or 165): http://us.rab.uk.com/product....ee.html I'm guessing the 120 would be better for wicking sweat, but I'd consider the 165 if that would be the one to get.

Let me know your thoughts/opinions, and if you have any other suggestions, thanks.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 06 2014, 8:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm still amazed at people who come on and ask, 'What, of the only three things in the world I would ever consider, which also happen to be wildly expensive, should I get?'

List your environment, what time of year you plan to use it, and how much money you can spend.

All I saw when you posted your list is, 'I'm a noob here to impress with a wad of money to spend,' or, 'I'm a noob here with no money to spend and here to try and impress. Either way, I'm not impressed.

Let's start over. Who are you, and why are you here?


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 06 2014, 9:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Patagonia Capilene. Silkweight for warmer temps, and the other weights are Polartec PowerDry. There are other makers that use PowerDry, too. It's warm for the weight, and offers great breathability and very fast dry times.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 06 2014, 9:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Cold weather?  Summer?  looks like cold, but...  Most base layers need to remove perspiration, but many end up wet, cold, and smelly.  A good merino wool base is preferred by many.  

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 06 2014, 10:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Phh...  the 8$ Fruit of the loom active ware (polyester) lightweight base layers at walmart....

BUt if you gotta buy trendy I like Patagonia and Columbia clothing.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 06 2014, 11:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I think my best wicker has been my Patagonia Capilene shirt and I'm not trendy. It is just the best performer I've got. I've got somewhere in the neighborhood of ten different wicking base layers and it just seems to perform best (dry fast, keep drier, etc. in all temps - 0 to 100F). I've also had good luck with poly in general but not quite as good. I think my Underarmour shirts probably perform the worst overall but use them on occasion because my wife spent an arm and a leg buying them. I save my merino wool base layer (Smartwool) for at camp. It's my most comfortable base layer I've got.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 06 2014, 11:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

bigsilk, I'm not interested in a reply from you. You're very immature, so don't respond again.

To the others, thanks for the tip on Patagonia. Based on comparisons I've looked at, the Phase AR may be better at wicking, but I haven't tried either myself.

I'm planning to use this in the bay area which is generally mild in the winter, and Tahoe which has significant temperature swings even in the summer. I have a Klymit Ulaar jacket with variable insulation, but I'll sweat a lot even when it's deflated. I have some merino products, but I'm looking for something specifically designed to wick sweat.

I'm not interested in trendy, just in "the best moisture mover". Backpacker has rated the Phase AR as the best moisture mover for 2012, and the Craft Warm as the best for 2013, although that page is down so I can't read the review. The Craft rep suggested the Active line instead of the Warm, so that's what I posted.

They recommend the Rab MeCo here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5L2_Dk445c

I'm simply looking for the best moisture mover for my purposes: hiking and snowboarding. Has anybody tried these? And if you have, and think there's something better, let me know.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 07 2014, 12:39 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Snowboarding is a bit more tricky since you sweat going down...and freeze sitting still on the way up. When doing winter activities (I snowshoe and used to snowboard/ski), I find it extremely different than hiking. When active, I usually just use my wicking layer but when I come to a stop, I pop on my Gore-Tex jacket and seal it up to ensure I'll not lose precious heat. When doing high activity range like skiing and snowboarding, I bring a daypack so that I can throw on extra mid layer for the ride up. I don't wear "ski/snowboard" clothing because it insulates too much and causes my layers to get wetter and wetter as the day/night progresses.

Hiking, on the other hand is a different beast. Unless it is winter, most of the time I am wearing just a short sleeve wicking layer all day until I get to camp. If the weather is sour in winter, I wear a wicking long sleeve with a Gore-Tex shell over the top with the pitzips open so I still am cool, yet dry.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 07 2014, 1:54 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Like Tigger, I like the Patagonia capilene, but I don't really think it's any kind of super material.

Really, any of the top end brands will be good.

I think BugSilks reaction was a little over the top, but he does make an important point that maybe should be added as as tricky at the top of this forum.

Asking about gear means providing context. Saying "which is the best ...." Is somewhat useless, and the info you'll receive, regardless how well intentioned, will also be useless. Your 2nd post offers a lot more info about the types of use, and the situations you'll likely be in. So you'll receive more relevant info.

I've not used any of the 3 pieces you mention.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 07 2014, 2:47 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

bigsilk has something of an aversion to "expensive" gear so don't mind him.  Don't worry, he's never impressed.  

I have the Phase AR in crew and zip neck.  In general I like dead bird outerwear but I think Smartwool merino wool clothing breathes better.  I'm partial to their half zip tops.  I doubt you can go wrong with anything by Rab but I can't say I have any of their baselayers.  

Personally, I've not been a fan of the fit on Patagonia Capilene stuff though it always seems to get good reviews.  I prefer a more athletic fit than the Patagonia pieces I've worn.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 07 2014, 6:39 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I ski 2-3 nights a week.  I've been quite comfortable wearing my Old Navy base layers w/ a Marmot fleece.  I have a Patagonia cap shirt I wore on my last weekender- I felt very clammy in the thing.
I also wear an Army surplus ECWS mock T w/ x-static coating on occasion.
I have smart wool, Patagonia, and marmot base layers since I worked at a ski shop for 10 years before I got married.  Now, I feel the old navy stuff I have wicks fine.
To each his own.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 07 2014, 8:46 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Patagonia Capilene is still my favorite.
I've only used Craft's bicycling pieces, and the stitching always irritated my skin.
All the merino baselayers I own itch me like crazy and changed to a completely different size/fit after I washed them the first time (cold wash / line dried).

I'll never buy another ice breakers item.  I had a shirt that fit me well off the shelf (slender 5'11").  Washed it once in cold water, line dried, and it looked like it might fit someone that was 5'2" with a 70 inch waist.  Sent it back to icebreakers and they said I had not washed it in the correct manner.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 07 2014, 10:13 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(UlightBandit @ Jan. 07 2014, 7:46 am)
QUOTE
I'll never buy another ice breakers item.  I had a shirt that fit me well off the shelf (slender 5'11").  Washed it once in cold water, line dried, and it looked like it might fit someone that was 5'2" with a 70 inch waist.  Sent it back to icebreakers and they said I had not washed it in the correct manner.

I don't think merino wool compares to stuff like Capilene performance-wise(certainly not in our humidity), but that's weird, man.
All my Icebreaker baselayers have been good to go, warm or cold water, though I usually wash them in cold and lay them out to dry. I've got 5 of their tops and 3 bottoms. Over the past couple years, two of the tops have been washed something like 2-3 dozen times, and all the bottoms at least a dozen times, and they all fit just like when I got them. Maybe something was wrong with the one you got, and they really did think that. That response would really turn me off, too, though!
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 07 2014, 11:35 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My favorite has always been a Patagonia capiline but this Christmas as a present I received an Icebreaker merino wool top base layer which is highly regarded.  I haven't had the chance to use it extensively, just on walks around the neighborhood, but I'm interested in seeing  how it works while x-country skiing this weekend.  As I understand it, the main advantage of merino wool is that it doesn't retain odors. This has never really bothered me but since my wife gave me the Icebreaker, perhaps it should have. ???

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 08 2014, 1:51 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for the replies. There are some better ones here than the first I received. What a way to "welcome" someone to a forum, right? The way some people act online, I wonder what their lives are like, but whatever.

HikeClimbBike thanks for your opinion. Based on what you're saying, it sounds like the Rab gear might be the way to go. It may combine the advantages of merino and synthetic. The Cocona technology sounds interesting. Here is another cool point: "For 2013 all Rab synthetic baselayer products contain Polygiene anti-bacterial technology."

I'm waiting on a response from someone at backcountry.com They have the Phase AR, and the Craft Active Extreme. They also have the Rab MeCo, but only for women unfortunately. All 3 are probably good, and may be at the top of the moisture wicking pile, but I want to try to make the right choice the first time if I can.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 08 2014, 5:57 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(BreakAes @ Jan. 06 2014, 11:48 pm)
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I'm planning to use this in the bay area...

I'm not interested in trendy...

Yeah.   Right.

Here's all the "moisture movement" you need in the bay area:



Buy all the expensive over-rated crap you like. HYOH
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 08 2014, 8:50 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

And none to that "gear" will do anything different then the 8$ Fruit of the look active ware lightweight base layer.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 08 2014, 8:51 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(BreakAes @ Jan. 08 2014, 1:51 am)
QUOTE
HikeClimbBike thanks for your opinion. Based on what you're saying, it sounds like the Rab gear might be the way to go. It may combine the advantages of merino and synthetic. The Cocona technology sounds interesting. Here is another cool point: "For 2013 all Rab synthetic baselayer products contain Polygiene anti-bacterial technology."

I'm waiting on a response from someone at backcountry.com They have the Phase AR, and the Craft Active Extreme. They also have the Rab MeCo, but only for women unfortunately. All 3 are probably good, and may be at the top of the moisture wicking pile, but I want to try to make the right choice the first time if I can.

I had some First Ascent stuff made with that Cocona material and it wasn't all that great.  They've stopped selling it.  I have a friend that works for Rab.  I'll get his take on it and report back.  For what its worth, I'd still give the Rab stuff a shot if I saw it in a store.  The $200 it costs for the zip neck Smartwool stuff I like is a bit steep even knowing how much I like it.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 08 2014, 10:03 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Starbreaker @ Jan. 08 2014, 8:50 am)
QUOTE
And none to that "gear" will do anything different then the 8$ Fruit of the look active ware lightweight base layer.

HYOH.

There are a lot of folks out there who wear the "expensive" gear, and a lot of them don't wear it just because its fancy.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 08 2014, 10:12 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

In cold weather I prefer smart wool merino stuff. It doesn't feel as clammy and cold when wet.
Hot weather I prefer thin synthetics. My favorite is actually made by addidas, but any one with a good fit and antimicrobial treatment usually works for me.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 08 2014, 11:52 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Man, there are some real ******* [removed!] in this forum. What are your major malfunctions? If you can't be cool, then don't respond. Pollute your own atmosphere.

The bay area has temperature swings due to all the microclimates. And garment technology does matter in my experience. The other day I hiked in Big Sur. As it warmed up I had to take my merino baselayer off, and switched to a synthetic tee that was much cooler. As I've been saying, I'm still looking for the ideal wicking baselayer.

HikeClimbBike, yeah, let me know what your friend says, thanks.

I just noticed there's an ignore button. That's nice.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 09 2014, 1:05 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I hike everywhere and anywhere in California - just got back from the Bay Area, where I hiked four days up north of Marin in Point Reyes.

I wear quality wool stuff I get from Sierra Trading Post. I had capilene and never wear it any more. Moving away from synthetics and into merino of various weights for various applications, happily and merrily, comfortably as I go. The exception being head wear - fleecy little hats and ear bands make my cold ears happy.

Spend the money as you please, but don't claim you can't get quality on a budget - I won't pay more than fifty bucks for any item of clothing unless it's a specialty thing.


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(BreakAes @ Jan. 08 2014, 11:52 pm)
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Man, there are some real *******  [removed!] in this forum.

Pretty  broad  brush you'r painting us with here.  As I reread these posts I don't see any thing to be particularly offended by.  You asked for opinions and got them. No one says you have to agree.  There are a wide variety of views from posters on nearly every topic.  That's one thing I appreciate about this forum - the widely differing opinions.  Gives me a lot of options to think about and choose from.  As with most things in life,, there is no absolute correct answer.  All you can do is gather as much information as you can and use it to make the choice that you thing is right for you.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 09 2014, 11:42 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hikerjer @ Jan. 09 2014, 8:31 am)
QUOTE

(BreakAes @ Jan. 08 2014, 11:52 pm)
QUOTE
Man, there are some real *******  [removed!] in this forum.

Pretty  broad  brush you'r painting us with here.  As I reread these posts I don't see any thing to be particularly offended by.  You asked for opinions and got them. No one says you have to agree.  There are a wide variety of views from posters on nearly every topic.  That's one thing I appreciate about this forum - the widely differing opinions.  Gives me a lot of options to think about and choose from.  As with most things in life,, there is no absolute correct answer.  All you can do is gather as much information as you can and use it to make the choice that you thing is right for you.

+1

For the most part, we all try and shoot straight from the hip and give honest opinions. We don't try and candy coat them for you so that you can have accurate information and "real" opinions. There are a variety of strategies, often including going on the cheap...which is a good thing since our sport can be extremely expensive. I understand you are very clear in regards to asking for "the best" but even that can be interpreted in many different ways. There is no one best. There is the most expensive, but not all wicking layers work the same in different environments. Humidity and cold affect wicking layers. That is why I don't hike in my Merino wool layer. Although it is my most comfortable wicking layer, it doesn't dry nearly as fast as my Capilene wicking layer. While my Underarmour is a bit warmer but still wicks, it isn't as comfortable and gets clammy. I have some polypro that wicks well but is scratchy. Same goes for my silver threaded stuff. Each material has it's properties and the way each manufacturer makes it affects how it feels against the skin, how it holds stink, how it wicks in different temps, and how fast it dries in different temps/humidity levels. That is why you're going to get such a variety of answers. We all live in different environments and what works for each of us is not going to necessarily work for you. Don't assume we are jerks. Give us as much information as you can about your environment and temps that you plan on hiking in and we'll do our best to give you honest, straight from the hip advice...sometimes with a little humor or sarcasm. Be aware that there will be tangent conversations in a thread you may start and this is perfectly acceptable here.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 09 2014, 12:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(BreakAes @ Jan. 08 2014, 11:52 pm)
QUOTE
Man, there are some real *******  [removed!] in this forum. What are your major malfunctions? If you can't be cool, then don't respond. Pollute your own atmosphere.

This thread contains a huge amount of great information from very knowledgeable and experienced people who have taken the time to respond to your question.  Take it or leave it.

FWIW, like many who have responded, I have no experience with the specific shirts you asked about, but I like capilene for moisture management.  For drier conditions I wear wool (Icebreaker).  No one baselayer does it all, I like to have a mix of different weights and materials for a wide range of weather conditions and activities.
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(BreakAes @ Jan. 08 2014, 11:52 pm)
QUOTE
The bay area has temperature swings due to all the microclimates. And garment technology does matter in my experience. The other day I hiked in Big Sur. As it warmed up I had to take my merino baselayer off, and switched to a synthetic tee that was much cooler. As I've been saying, I'm still looking for the ideal wicking baselayer.

While I agree that fabrics matter, I personally think that there's not that much difference specifically in the wicking properties among synthetics as you seem to believe.  I think what we tend to attribute to fabric performance has more to do with how well we choose the outer layers for particular conditions.

I also think what many of us perceive as "wicking" is actually our body heat drying the fabric.  Faster drying fabrics, often synthetic, are touted as being great at wicking moisture simply because they dry faster.

I'm not sure what your experience in Big Sur is intended to illustrate... just because a garment is an "ideal" wicking baselayer, it can still be too warm to wear in certain conditions.  If you're looking for a top layer that works in the widest range of conditions, that may be a different animal.  (And I would probably suggest a quick-dry woven hiking shirt for that criteria.)

My personal experience is much like AlmostThere's.  I have almost no synthetic baselayer tops left, including short-sleeved T-shirts.  I think merino works in a wider range of conditions and I just find them more comfortable all-around.  I wear very lightweight (120g) merino T-shirts in summer.  For high-exertion activities in cold weather (like X-country skiing) when wet baselayers can be a serious problem, I find that wearing two thin merino baselayers dries faster.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 09 2014, 3:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It's been a long time since I posted on this forum, but this got me interested.
Since about a year I avoid wicking shirts. It's fleece on the skin for me now (unless it's too hot outside).
It started when I got a Buffalo TecLite jacket. The inside is some sort of fleece and Buffalo advises to wear it on your naked skin. At first it seems odd, but it works. No need for a wicking shirt - I'm more comfortable without it.
When it's too cold for the TecLite alone, I wear a thin fleece under it. Again on my naked skin. And again, it's more comfortable than a wicking shirt.

I've nothing against wicking shirts. If the temperature and the circumstances are there, I'll wear it. For hiking, Capilene is very good in my opinion. My Odlo shirt is slightly better, but starts to stink after half a day. Both are beaten though by my (Italian) cycling shirts - but they aren't durable enough for hiking.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 09 2014, 10:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Every forum has their peculiarities.  There are some nice folks here but boy are they cheap when it comes to buying gear.  If you want to talk top quality gear, head over to BPL.  Folks there care more about performance and weight than cost.  There's a definite cottage industry bias at BPL though.
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BreakAes Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 10 2014, 4:13 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've decided to try the Rab 120 since it's less likely to stink than the synthetics. The MeCos are treated with Polygiene, and the Phase AR and Craft gear aren't, so the Rab gear seems to offer the best all around performance while still wicking well.

I think you all know, and if you don't I'll tell you now, that I wasn't talking about everybody on the forum being an *******, but **** like this is ridiculous: "All I saw when you posted your list is, 'I'm a noob here to impress with a wad of money to spend,' or, 'I'm a noob here with no money to spend and here to try and impress. Either way, I'm not impressed." That was the first response I got when posting to this forum. What the **** is that? Yeah, I really need to impress people, especially on a forum like this. Maybe he's poor, and ashamed and butthurt because of it.

And "toejam's" response. How childish and arrogant to suggest I'm trendy after I said I'm not.  If I were trendy I'd pick more interesting clothes. These baselayers all look ******* boring. But sure, I'm the trendiest motherfucker in the world, and in his mind at least, his ego is superior cause he's not.

Anyway, I'm not spending any more time on this immature nonsense. The ignore button is nice, and every forum should have one.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 10 2014, 4:32 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ah, maybe, as you indicated, this isn't the place for you.  Bye.

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"Too often I have met men who boast only of how many miles they've traveled and not of what they've seen."  -  Louis L'Amour
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