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Topic: Osprey Daypacks, What's the difference?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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RebeccaD Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2014, 4:03 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I am looking at a new daypack in the 24-30 L range, and because I have other Osprey packs that fit well and I like, I am looking at those.  But I'm mystified--Osprey has about 6 lines of packs, each coming in all sizes, and looking, as far as I can tell, like they are pretty much the same (prices are all in the same range, too).  Are the differences between, say, the Sirrius and the Stratos and the Talon just the configuration of the pack bags?  (okay, the Talon doesn't seem to have a real back panel and suspension, just a stiff foam panel.  I have a Talon 14 and that works well at that size, but raises questions for carrying a full day's gear and clothing).

Anyone have any thoughts?


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2014, 4:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm not familiar with all of them, but the differences I saw when shopping were the suspension names and specifics(Airspeed-trampoline, Airscape-mesh over foam, etc), whether or not they had hydration bladders and/or water bottle pockets, whether they had organizer pockets, where and what type, and then use-specific features like those thingies for holding a bike helmet.
Confusing as crap, but I guess they want to be all things to all people.
I use a Manta 25 for hiking, and a Raptor 14 for mountain biking. Same alphabet soup with the Raptor. I had to go look at it to see what it was, 'cause I still had the Viper model's name stuck in my head.

From the pics I pulled up...

Sirrus/Stratos(women's/men's):
Airspeed trampoline backpanel, stow it thing for trekking poles, integrated raincover, no hydration bladder.
-For hikers. Better ventilation, rain cover, trekking pole attachment.


Talon:  Airscape, mesh over foam backpanel, no hydration bladder, helmet holder thing, stretch pockets on back and shoulder straps.
-For bikers. Closer fit to body, pockets for access to regular use items without taking pack off, helmet attachment.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2014, 4:38 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I am not familiar with all models of Osprey packs, but I will say this. I shopped around for quite some time for a new day pack myself, and just recently bought one. It was a Osprey Stratos 24. It has a place for hydration sleeve, I love the back panel, it has a nice waist belt and fits everything that I want to take for a day hike. I like the fact it came with a integrated rain cover and the waist belt is great.
I realize this doesnt answer any of your questions you had as I really dont know the differences but I do know the pros and cons to the Stratos.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2014, 4:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use a Talon 22 as a light daypack, but it isn't really built to handle much load.  The Stratos is beefier, but for heavier loads I use a Kestrel.  (I also use it for business travel).
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2014, 5:40 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have a Stratos 36 for me, for long day hikes, and it can handle a goodly stash of gear, water and food.  I bought my youngest son a Talon 33, and he likes it a lot.   I love that pack for smaller loads, for dayhiking.  It fits well, and close to the back so it feels really nice for maintaining your balance up steeps and nasty stuff.  Both real nice stuff bags, and comfy too.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2014, 6:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Osprey makes sport specific packs.  I can't tell you the name of the line for each sport, but I do know they have designs for a number of specific activities.  I really like their packs.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2014, 9:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I am partial to the Kestral (Men)/ Kyte(Wimmenz) line of packs...  They have worked great for me in the past, although I admit I have gone to a minimalist REI Flash 22 and have not looked back....  My best bag ever.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2014, 9:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

the Sirrius and the Stratos and the Talon

looking their  site:

Sirrus Series - Women's Day Hiking/Ventilated

Stratos Series - Men's Day Hiking/Ventilated


Multi-Use Men's  Talon Series

Looking at the specs of the Talon vs stratos, the later is heavier, but  carries the same load , i guess because  of a curved back panel to ventilate?

A ski pack would be have a way to attach skis and could carry more weight.

A Light weight pack probably won't carry as much.  Not sure what is different
about bikers pack, I tried using regular  daypack and found it makes my back sore,so I would only do this for a short time with  a light pack

Looks like you just have to fight your way thru the specs etc.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2014, 11:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The curved back and mesh ventilation on my Stratos makes it comfortable and helps keep my back cool on hot summer hikes.  I can place my ice cold water bladder in the mesh compartment, next to my back, for more cooling.  On cold days I stuff a piece of clothing in the mesh compartment for warmth and put the water bladder in the inner compartment.  Unfortunately the curve of the frame bottlenecks the storage compartment a bit.  I don't know if Osprey any longer makes packs with the curved ventilation frames with mesh.  It  wasn't a feature on the last two models I looked at, lower volume packs including the Osprey Raptor I like for biking.  
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2014, 12:06 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The curvature of the Stratos bothered me, which is one of the reasons I prefer the Kestrel.  All these packs differ to varying degrees in how they fit and how they feel with weight.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2014, 10:02 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have 3 different Osprey packs. The thing that I notice as a difference in the day packs is the hip belt. Some just have a thin webbing strap whereas others have a nicer hipbelt  more like a regular pack does with some pockets on the sides and a little padding. It gives you a little more fabric to rest on your hips.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2014, 11:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks, everyone!  That is helpful.  I was frustrated because some of the packs have very good mark-downs on the REI web site but are only available on-line, so I can't go try them all.  I have a Talon14 I use to haul my swim stuff to the gym (on my bike) and though it is very comfy for that use, think the suspension would be inadequate for all-day loads.

I may order two different packs and return to REI what I don't like (unless I like one and the DH the other, as he needs a pack too).  For the trip we are doing, we are recommended to bring around 2000 cu. in., though that seems overkill.  Again, if I order, I may get both the 26 liter and the 30, and see how the stuff fits.

(For the record, we are doing a supported trek in Peru this summer--two, actually, back-to-back, for 21 days total.  We need to be able to carry everything we'll need during the day for changeable conditions, photo gear, and maybe lunch, definitely snacks.  I'll want the first aide kit and probably drawing or painting gear).


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 29 2014, 4:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have a Kestral 38 and love it.  It is pretty big for a daypack-I actually use it for short backpacking trips.  It has actual stays and a good padded hipbelt.  I'm guessing the Kyte series is the Women's equivalent.  If you are looking for something in the larger range I'd recommend it.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 29 2014, 5:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm hoping to go a little smaller than the 38.  In recent years I've used my son's Fox 40 for dayhikes, and tended to fill it, but it usually carry gear and food for everyone (with all three guys carrying just hydration packs.  Don't ask me how it got that way!).  On this trip the guys are carrying their own cwap, for sure!

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 29 2014, 5:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Tell the DH that this is the trip where you are going to be the Princess, and expect him to carry everything but the parasol you will be carrying.  He can hand you a water bottle when you require it.  :D  

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 29 2014, 5:53 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RebeccaD @ Jan. 29 2014, 5:10 pm)
QUOTE
I'm hoping to go a little smaller than the 38.  In recent years I've used my son's Fox 40 for dayhikes, and tended to fill it, but it usually carry gear and food for everyone (with all three guys carrying just hydration packs.  Don't ask me how it got that way!).  On this trip the guys are carrying their own cwap, for sure!

The Kestrel 32 is really nice, too.  I like the 38 because it's not a panel loader, but I appreciate the smaller volume of the 32 sometimes.   By the way, if you don't totally stuff it, the 38 is just barely short enough to fit in the overhead bin of a 737 or equivalent.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 29 2014, 7:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(big_load @ Jan. 29 2014, 2:53 pm)
QUOTE

(RebeccaD @ Jan. 29 2014, 5:10 pm)
QUOTE
I'm hoping to go a little smaller than the 38.  In recent years I've used my son's Fox 40 for dayhikes, and tended to fill it, but it usually carry gear and food for everyone (with all three guys carrying just hydration packs.  Don't ask me how it got that way!).  On this trip the guys are carrying their own cwap, for sure!

The Kestrel 32 is really nice, too.  I like the 38 because it's not a panel loader, but I appreciate the smaller volume of the 32 sometimes.   By the way, if you don't totally stuff it, the 38 is just barely short enough to fit in the overhead bin of a 737 or equivalent.

That's good to know, BL.

Zeke--he's too easily distracted by photography and such to have him carry my food and water.  I made that mistake on a hike when I was pregnant with our first.  I lost him somewhere, and had to be rescued by his brothers with food and water :D. I carry my own.  And so do all my guys.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 07 2014, 8:00 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The Kestrel also comes in a 28 and is a top loader

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 07 2014, 9:12 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I recently purchased the Kestrel 32 after doing the same thing that you're doing now.  I bought the 32L size because I could use it for both day hikes and short overnighters.  I also liked the panel loading feature as opposed to it being a top loader.

The only thing that I wasn't real happy about was the weight; it weighs slightly more than 2.5 pounds.  When I started my search for a new pack I had planned on buying something lighter.  But, now that I have the Kestrel 32 I'm very happy with what I got.
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