SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.


» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

Page 1 of 512345>>

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: All the small things..., and how to keep them light and effective< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
92hatchattack Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 238
Joined: May 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2014, 8:53 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hey gang,

First and foremost a huge thank you to everyone who has been helping me out. This is an amazing forum with truly great people who have a wealth of knowledge.  While I continue to ponder over which way I am going to go with a pack I figured I would start working on the rest of my gear list. Here is what I own so far:

half dome plus
Snow Peak cooking set
head lamp
xtherm air mattress
UGQ Quilt

Pack choice is in the works and I'm pretty sure I'm going with a Sawyer Squeeze for filtration. Besides clothing,food and water, I'd love for everyone to take a look at the rest of the list I have put together. Please advise if I have missed anything important, or if there are things I really don't need to be carrying. I am also looking for suggestions on anything listed below. I'd love to hear how you guys pack these items to keep things small and light.  I'm just going to go for it here and we'll see how this all shakes out.

Trowel
TP
lighter + secondary (Suggestions for light reliable lighter? Best backup choice?)
Compass
map
Toothbrush
toothpaste (ideas for packing this light and small?)
sunscreen          "    "                "      "
insect repellant         ""                ""
First aid kit   (what to pack to keep this light but still have what I need in case of emergency?)
Knife   (lightweight but sturdy, specific recommendations welcome!)
Pack rain cover
Pillow   (I need something, could buy a light inflatable or stuff a pillow case with clothes)
Whistle    (reliable and light)
Spoon
50' nylon cord for hanging food bag
Food bag  (Looking for something light and waterproof for hanging food. How much volume should I be looking for)

That's what I've got so far.  Am I missing anything important? Suggestions and recommendations?

Thanks guys and gals. Your help means a lot and it is really appreciated!

---Joe
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 2
AlmostThere Search for posts by this member.
I must not be there yet, I keep hiking...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5705
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2014, 9:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Next step is to get an actual weight of everything. :)

You haven't included clothing. Most people also take a camera or their phone.

As for the first aid kit - bandaids, moleskin, two kinds of tape (leukotape and some medical tape), analgesics, benadryl, zyrtec, and any prescriptions are what I take - the rest of the "kit" is the gear I have, clean filtered water, and what's between my ears. A wilderness first aid class (basic) can teach you a lot about the kinds of things repurposed gear can do - a trekking pole section can be a splint, two trekking poles and a jacket a travois, all your insulation can help you fight hypothermia, etc. But you have to understand symptoms and what to do with the stuff. I also have non latex gloves, just in case I'm handling someone else's open wound and don't want to risk blood pathogens.

The NOLS wilderness medicine guide can be helpful - a very thorough treatment of the subject.


--------------
All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
     Friedrich Nietzsche
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 3
92hatchattack Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 238
Joined: May 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2014, 9:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I know theres an wilderness first aid course coming up for our boy scout organization. I'm gonna sit in on that I think.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 4
GottaGamble Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1799
Joined: Sep. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2014, 9:38 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

lose the trowl..use sticks/rocks. Ditch the toothbrush and paste..look at cvs or Duane Read for a whisp. Its a mini toothbrush with toothpaste in it already..comes in packs of 4..small and light.  Forget the pack cover. The rain will still travel down your back and pack straps with a cover on. Use a pack liner instead.  If you are planning on hiking on trails, use a map and small no frills compass, you dont need an orienting compass if you plan on staying on trails. My new foodbag that I have been useing is from Lukes Ultralight, the Critter bag. I line it with opsack and hang it PCT style. Superlightweight, tough and simple to hang. I have had NO problems with this system. Keep your first-aid kit small and simple. Chances are you wont need more then some antiseptic and bandaides for some scratches. Add some more things but dont overdue it, keep that first-aid kit simple, Almostthere nailed it for you. Deff take the wilderness first aid course..Knowledge is POWER...

--------------
Dirtbag_hiker @ instagram

"Of all the paths you choose in life, make sure some of them are dirt"
                                      author unknown
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 5
MississipVol Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 128
Joined: Nov. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2014, 9:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(92hatchattack @ Mar. 05 2014, 8:53 pm)
QUOTE

Here are a couple recommendations I would make:

For a knife there are hundred of options but here are a couple good ones:

- Mora Light My Fire Knife - Serious knife if planning on processing wood. Durable 3.9" blade with a built-in fire steel. Knife and sheath weight 3.4 ounces.

- Benchmade Teather Knife - Well made knife with a 2.0" blade and weighs only 1.6 ounces. But it is kind of expensive.

- Ultralight backpackers just carry a couple razor blades

Food Bag - I think the Zpacks Bear Bagging Kit is a really reasonably priced option, especially considering that it is made with cuben fiber. It is enough for 5 or 6 days worth of food.
ZPacks Bear Bag Kit
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 6
92hatchattack Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 238
Joined: May 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2014, 9:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

^^^ WOW, thats crazy light and the price is right! Youve used this before and can vouch for it?
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 7
ol-zeke Search for posts by this member.
Clear Creek
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12891
Joined: Sep. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2014, 10:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Trowel--If you must take something for this, use a snow stake, or something that can do double doodie.
TP--Only take as much as you need.  Figure out how many days you are going out, and put the tp in a zip lock.
lighter + secondary (Suggestions for light reliable lighter? Best backup choice?)  mini bic, 2 of them
Compass
map
Toothbrush-- I have an electric at home and I carry one of the small replacement brushes.
toothpaste (ideas for packing this light and small?)--ziplock of Tom's powder or baking soda
sunscreen          "    "                "      "
insect repellant         ""                ""
First aid kit   (what to pack to keep this light but still have what I need in case of emergency?)--Ibuprofin, antihistamine, anti-diarrhea, bandaids, moleskin, tape.
Knife   (lightweight but sturdy, specific recommendations welcome!)--single edge razor blade, 2 of them
Pack rain cover-ditch, use a trash compactor bag as a liner.
Pillow   (I need something, could buy a light inflatable or stuff a pillow case with clothes)
Whistle    (reliable and light) -orange plastic loud one.
Spoon -- long handled plastic spoon
50' nylon cord for hanging food bag-- lightest cord you can find, might be Amsteel.  5/64ths would be plenty strong if Amsteel is the way you go.  


--------------
Everything I know, I learned by doing it wrong at least twice.

"I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth."  Steve McQueen
Online
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 8
AlmostThere Search for posts by this member.
I must not be there yet, I keep hiking...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5705
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2014, 10:07 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I will put in a good word for Zing It! It's an arborist's line, very much kinder to bark than paracord and much less likely to break and leave you with no bear hanging line.

And a bear canister if you go where the bears like people food.


--------------
All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
     Friedrich Nietzsche
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 9
Owen571 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1009
Joined: Apr. 2011
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2014, 10:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You're getting lots of good info. What's in that Snow Peak cookset?
Eating utensils and dishes are another place you can save weight.
For instance, you've got to eat with something. Spork, whatever. Titanium sporks look cool. A plastic Light My Fire spork is lighter and cheaper. A GSI plastic spoon is even lighter and cheaper. One from a fast food restaurant is even lighter and free(though I don't actually trust those).
You've got to eat out of something, too. Eating oatmeal from a cup and dehydrated meals from a plastic bag will get old quick. You can spend $15 on something like a Snow Peak titanium bowl or some silicone thing from Sea 2 Summit, or you can go to WalMart and get 2-cup "Takealongs" with a screw on lid that weigh half an ounce less for $5/3-pack.

Here's a pretty cool minimalist knife ;)
http://www.agrussell.com/ag-russ....S-P3TIB

A small firesteel is better than a spare lighter, especially if you're just using it to light your stove. Never runs out of fluid, and getting wet won't hurt it.

Sunscreen and toothpaste come in travel sizes. I get little spray bottles from the travel section to use for insect repellent, too.

Pillow. Those mesh ditty bags aren't the lightest things, but they feel better than silnylon or other stuff sacks(I shave my head, so maybe that matters more to me). I keep my puffy jacket in one, and use it for a pillow. If using the jacket to supplement the sleep system, I just stuff something else in there. Pants, clothes bag, rain gear, etc.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 10
92hatchattack Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 238
Joined: May 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2014, 11:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I just used "cookset" to simplify.  Ife got the 700ml pot and maxlite burner. 6.7oz total weight without fuel.  I really dont care about eating freeze dired meals. They are light an easy. I dont want to mess with cleaning pots or long cooks. Just not what I want to be doing while im out there.   I dont even like cooking at home.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 11
toesnorth Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2707
Joined: Jan. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2014, 11:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I like Mountain House freeze dried food okay but you might want to check out 'Freezer Bag Cooking' by one of our own, Sarah Svien.


Oh, and duct tape is a good multi-use item.


--------------
"Failure is never as frightening as regret."
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 12
Montanalonewolf Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 7125
Joined: Mar. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2014, 11:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Double bag the TPin 2 ziplocs.
Since I also burn used paper afterwards*, it's a good place to keep a spare mini butane lighter. Also a small bottle of hand sanitizer.

*I dig a hole, do my business, use TP, burn TP and then pee on it to make sure it's out before burying.

" I couln't even get the tittle right"
That would be 'title'...  :p


--------------
If you are free to be a Liberal- Thank a person with a gun.

Those who don't read have no advantage over those who can't.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 13
92hatchattack Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 238
Joined: May 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2014, 11:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Haha, long day.......and I suck at spelling.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 14
Tigger Search for posts by this member.
Woods Pouncer
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 11997
Joined: Apr. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 12:24 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I prefer baby wipes to TP personally. I can carry less and they wipe better. In summer, I carry them dry and moisten them at the nearby river before use to save weight.

Travel size stuff for toothpaste/bug repellent, etc.

I bring just enough toothpaste and a half toothbrush - each person has their preference. I've tried other options and keep going back to this.

I'm apparently a spoon enthusiast. I've collected a large variety over the years. I tend to grab my long handed Sea to Summit most often. I don't like dirty knuckles caused by Mountain House bags...

I always bring a trash bag or gallon ziplock for trash.

If your pack isn't water resistant, spray it with DWR as well. If it does rain, it will hold water and get heavy. It's nice to be able to set it down anywhere without concern of it turning into a sponge.

As stated, a small roll of duct tape. I usually carry around 2-3 ft. of it.

Tent repair kit (tenacious tape and McNett's). Can't leave home without it.

I also like Athletic tape for clothing repairs.

I'll third the Moleskin. It's saved my bacon more times than I can count.

Toss the trowel.

A small notebook and pencil - To write down the stuff you want to take or leave at home next time. The next time you pack, refer to it. It will help you tighten the load.

A spare tent stake.

Spare batteries.

I won't touch the pillow. That is a few threads by itself. Heck...we could probably dedicate an entire section of the forum to that discussion. Personally, I only bring one in the dead of winter when I'm hauling a sled and if I'm going to do it, I get a decent sized "real" pillow. Otherwise, I use what I have at hand - dry sack partially inflated with leftover clothes inside for a bit of cushion wrapped in a shirt.


--------------
If I'm going to be lost, in the woods is where I want to be...
Online
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 15
92hatchattack Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 238
Joined: May 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 5:43 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

^^^ Do you pack the wipes out? I dont supose the decompose well do they?
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 16
bigsilk Search for posts by this member.
A different kind of rebel...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1179
Joined: Feb. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 6:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Trowel - Coughlan's makes a good one -- light and very orange

TP - you'll likely take a dump once a day -- prepare accordingly. I unroll ten or so feet, roll it tight, fold the wrap in half lengthwise, hold it together with a rubber band (another multi-tasker) and into a FB with baking soda and your toothbrush -- complete hygiene system.

lighter + secondary (Suggestions for light reliable lighter? Best backup choice?) I used to like baby bics. More recently, though, I've found djeep lighters are easier to use with gloves on or with cold hands; while they're also only as tall as a baby bic, they're thicker and have a bigger valve button. I'm no weight-weenie; if it works best and isn't prohibitively heavy,  I use it.

Compass - small baseplate, and only entirely useful as a system with a map and the knowledge to use them.

map - try and find Tyvek maps -- water resistant and nearly bombproof

Toothbrush -- cut the handle down

toothpaste (ideas for packing this light and small?) -- Do you really need minty-fresh breath out there? Try baking soda -- use it for other stuff, too, like an upset tummy, burn poultice, light abrasive

sunscreen          "    "                "      " -- just bring some -- it's part of your 'ten essentials'

insect repellant         ""                "" -- listen to others, I haven't found any that 'works.' I'd say the best two forms of avoiding insects are to keep moving and getting into a bug screen. DEET.

First aid kit   (what to pack to keep this light but still have what I need in case of emergency?) -- again, ten essentials -- I include my repair in this category. I look at it like this: If the tent rips, I patch it; if my skin rips, I patch it. Spare batteries go here, too.

Knife   (lightweight but sturdy, specific recommendations welcome!) -- this:


$5 online -- sharp as a razor. Durable? I haven't broken one yet.

Pack cover -- My pack came with one. I like it for hanging my pack on a tree. Contractor's bags work well. Sorry, Tigger, but I'd rather not carry a wet pack. Even using a garbage bag, outside is better, even if water runs down your back.

Pillow   (I need something, could buy a light inflatable or stuff a pillow case with clothes) -- Pull the majority of your fleece jacket into a sleeve from the inside and distribute it.

Whistle    (reliable and light) -- Coughlan's -- no 'pea' or any moving parts. Plastic, surely.

Spoon -- see my 'knife' pic

50' nylon cord for hanging food bag -- paracord ruining bark for a hang bag? Hmm... Try Nite-ize cord with the reflective stuff in it -- makes it easier to find for that morning cuppa or to have to bug out most tick.

Food bag  (Looking for something light and waterproof for hanging food. How much volume should I be looking for) -- Well, get all the food and smelly things you plan to bring -- consider your sleeping bag's stuff sack. Tie a small stick about 10" above the bag -- acts as a drip stick and helps keep the little guys from getting to it. Consider that you should protect your food from mice first, then bears. Bears are easy to keep food from, mice aren't.

I've uploaded an instructable for my ultralight, 1.6 pound complete kitchen here: UL backpacking kitchen. All it needs is water and food.


--------------
There are only two things I don't like about people: They take too long to cook and taste like crap when they're done.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 17
MississipVol Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 128
Joined: Nov. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 7:26 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(92hatchattack @ Mar. 05 2014, 9:50 pm)
QUOTE
^^^ WOW, thats crazy light and the price is right! Youve used this before and can vouch for it?

Yes I have. Zpacks makes GREAT stuff. They also sell a clothes stuff sack with a soft fleece side that is ridiculously light to use as a pillow. You may want to check that out as well.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 18
AlmostThere Search for posts by this member.
I must not be there yet, I keep hiking...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5705
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 8:37 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You should pack out everything but the #1 and #2, and the #2 needs to be buried appropriately.

Critters will dig up the toilet paper and strew it all over the wilderness. There are trails where I see, just 50 feet off the trail, flowers of filthy toilet paper all over the ground.

Yosemite requires you to pack out all toilet paper. I started doing it everywhere - not contributing to the MESS I see at some of the popular places. I go out to do the deed and can't find a bush or three without a decoration.

A ziploc for TP and another for used TP, both inside a third larger ziploc. Doesn't take a lot to do.


--------------
All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
     Friedrich Nietzsche
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 19
TigerFan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2677
Joined: May 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 9:59 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You've gotten good responses.  I personally pack out all my toilet paper, regardless of whether it's required or not.  Whenever this subject comes up on internet boards, everyone swears they bury/burn/dispose of their used toilet paper appropriately but the fact is that I run into it everywhere.  I can hike an entire day without seeing anyone but still find toilet paper.  Blech.  So, I've just made the decision to pack it out.

"The small things" is where I spend very little money.  I use a cheap headlamp (Black Diamond Gizmo), a cheap knife (small Gerber folding blade), a spartan first aid kit, basic compass, etc.  For toiletries, I spent $10 on a Nalgene "travel kit" on Amazon a long time ago and refill them at home.  You really only need an ounce or less of most toiletry items for a week.

Two good resources for "stuff":
"Minimus" for travel-sized anything.  Good for food condiment packets, small toothbrushes, etc.
http://www.minimus.biz/

"Rum Runner" flasks and travel-sized containers:
http://www.rumrunnerflasks.com/


--------------
Duct tape is like the Force.  It has a light side, a dark side, and it holds the universe together.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 20
ashepabst Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1295
Joined: Jul. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 10:27 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Bic is the only disposable lighter to trust.

of course you'll need something to carry your water... bladder or bottle. when i switched to an Osprey pack from my old Gregory i switched to a bladder because the Osprey doesn't have the handy bottle holders on the side like the old Gregorys did.

it took me about 5 years of backpacking with a heavy knife before i realized that i never used the dang thing. the very next trip -- the first sans-knife -- i needed to cut some cord!  oops... but it turns out a lighter works just as well for cutting cord. anyway, a blade is a good emergency item but one you probably won't get a lot of use out of... go with a razor blade as others have suggested. that's what i do.

you're east coast so you'll have to deal with water crossings at some point. crossings that are deeper than your boots are tall are a special consideration, especially if it's the kind of crossing that wouldn't be advisable barefoot. this is a tough-y because shoes ain't light, and 1-pound item that hardly gets used is easy to talk yourself out of. but, it can be a safety issue. i got myself some RocSocs at Bad Knees suggestion... haven't tried them out yet but i think it's gonna be a winner. some folks use Crocs to this end.

along that line... think about getting yourself some leg gaiters. they'll make your boots a bit taller. while most aren't waterproof, they will keep one wrong step during a rock-hop from ruining your dry feet. they're also good for brushy, overgrown trails... keeps me from needing to wear long pants on those hot summer hikes. spritz on a little permethrin and DEET to keep the blood-suckers off your legs.

...just a few things to think about.


--------------
      /\    /\/\        / \       / \
 /\/   \ /      \  /\ /    \-^/    \^.   /\
/   \    \        \/  \       \ /       \ \ /  \ /\
     \     \       \    \       /          \/     /   \
                           \    /             \
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 21
92hatchattack Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 238
Joined: May 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 10:55 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Great info everyone.   Do any of you like to pre treat your gear and clothing with the sawyers permethrin?  I'm really not into ticks.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 22
ashepabst Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1295
Joined: Jul. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 11:14 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

definitely!  treat your hiking socks and pant legs, gaiters. i've had literally hundreds of tiny seed ticks on my legs at once --creepy!  wornoutboots just posted a TR in the Southern Form --found himself a February tick, he did.

--------------
      /\    /\/\        / \       / \
 /\/   \ /      \  /\ /    \-^/    \^.   /\
/   \    \        \/  \       \ /       \ \ /  \ /\
     \     \       \    \       /          \/     /   \
                           \    /             \
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 23
JRinGeorgia Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 597
Joined: Jul. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 11:15 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

For toothpaste you can make toothpaste dots -- squeeze the amount that you would use per brushing onto a plate, as many as you will need, and let them air dry for a few days. Put them in a baggie with some baking soda to keep them from sticking together and take only as many as you need. This works only with paste not gel.

Re-package sunscreen, bug spray, soap, hand sanitizer, etc. You can buy mini bottles online or use empty eyedropper bottles.


--------------
- JRinGeorgia
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 24
RebeccaD Search for posts by this member.
Double Arch, Arches N.P.
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 11499
Joined: Jul. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 12:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Some great advice and ideas here.  Time for my 2 cents (probably worth about half price).

Trowel: I skip it when traveling alone, but we share one when the family is out together.  It's particularly good with a kid--they have enough trouble digging the holes.  The cheap orange one from REI is fine, though we have managed to break one or two over the years.

TP: I take a packet (or two) of the pocket-sized kleenex.  It is much tougher than TP, and you can use as little as a half a sheet most times.  Agree with all those saying pack it out.  I BP in the arid West, so NEVER burn TP.  Besides, due to realities of being female, my TP usually won't burn.

Lighter--mini Bic and a box of matches, in a zip-lock.  I have a small emergency kit with firestarter (I made it from an egg carton, wood shavings, and wax) and another box of matches.  Even if a lighter runs out of fuel, the spark is enough to light a stove.  But wet Bics don't work for beans.

Toothbrush etc.--small folding brush and the mini-toothpastes the dentist gives up.  Preferably already half empty, since you don't need much at all.

Knife--I just take a small, light, single blade folding knife.  It gets heavy use cutting cheese and sausage.

First Aid: listen to advice.  I pruned ours way down a few years ago, so mostly carry bandaides, antihistimines and ibuprofen, an ace bandage (for sprains--tape, etc., works well too, and this is probably a waste), antibiotic ointment (effectiveness of this has been called into question recently), something for the trots and some antacid, and a small repair kit for clothes and tents--self-stick nylon patch, needle and thread, some safety pins and a couple of buttons.  I think that's about it.  Should add gloves in case ever dealing with a stranger's wound.  We used to have them all the time, when dealing with little kids with diapers and/or training issues.  

Rain cover: I like my sylnylon pack cover.  Very small and light, and keeps the pack dry, which is nice since I use the empty pack under my feet at night.  Still line important things inside with plastic if going in wet conditions (we've been spoiled by years in the Rockies and Sierra, where we mostly deal with rain by being under cover by the time the afternoon t-storms hit).

Pillow: I stuff a few things into the leg of my fleece pants (unless it's really cold, in which case I might have to wear them to bed atop my longies).

Spoon: Starbucks gives out a nice, long-handled spoon with their oatmeal.  They'll even give you one without the (awful) oatmeal if you ask.  

Food bag: we use old sleeping bag stuff sacks.  Not always the lightest, but a little water-resistant and they are lying around.  I want to get an Ursack, though.  Then we could skip the 50' of paracord, too.  Hang them using the PCT method (google it).

I'm trying to think what other small things I take.  I like to take a nail clipper.  It's small and light and can really save your neck if a fingernail gets torn (not for cosmetic purposes, mind--just because a torn nail if rough can keep tearing until OUCH!) or a toenail is digging in.  

I also use an allergy nasal spray at home, but it's in a glass bottle and heavy, so I don't take it BPing.  What I do take is a small bottle of saline spray.  Keeping the sinuses a little moist helps with my breathing.  I'm guessing you won't need the hairbrush and/or comb I require, or the etc.

Headlamps are small and light--Petzl or Black Diamond cheap(ish) ones of only a couple ounces.

This is personal stuff, but you may want a book (or an e-reader--my Nook weighs a little more than a small mass-market paperback, but can take a lot of books (if we're lucky, including the guide book).  The battery easily lasts 7 or 8 days, maybe two weeks if you don't read through too many afternoon t-storms.  And as I think I mentioned elsewhere, I HAVE to have a notebook for writing (well, I'm a writer :D ).  I like one that has blank pages, so I usually take a small sketch pad.  I'm trying to illustrate my journals more.

One other total luxury we take is the thermarest chair kit.  We do like to sit and read, and in general it gives the back a good break.  But I have heard from others that these don't do for the larger and taller people, so YMMV.


--------------
Writerly thoughts, book reviews, and random short fiction found at
The Ninja Librarian Blog
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 25
QCHIKER Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2359
Joined: Oct. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 1:55 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

On treating your clothes with permethrin just get some at a place like Farm and Fleet and dilute it to the strength that Sawyers is. It'll save you a lot of money. I just use a cheap spray bottle to apply it.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 26
dayhiker9 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5893
Joined: Apr. 2003
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 2:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I vote for a pack cover if you expect rainy weather, lighter than a wet pack.  In NZ I saw people using a poncho, pack cover combo, seemed ideal.  I still water proof stuff in my pack, with either a pack liner or roll top dry bags, with or without a pack cover.

I use a dry sack from sea kayaking for a food bag, but that one from zpacks looks nice if it is as durable as they say.  Sometimes I take a mesh  sack (rat sac others) esp. if camping in established campsites, for mice , birds etc.

A toothbrush without tooth paste works for short periods of time.  I use an MSR stake instead of a trowel, though sometimes I wish I had a trowel.  Since I don't eat much fiber when backpack I don't have to worry about this much after a day for about a week. I save the end of a roll (at home) to take on backpacks)

Look for a headlamp with a long burn time.  Take flashlight or another headlamp instead of spare batteries & blub

(very)Small knife is handy for food other things.  Neosporin(sp) , mole skin duck tape, band aids, guaze, etc.  Matches, lighter,(cotton) lint mixed with vasoline for fire starter. Another knife with scissors, twizzors.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 27
markskor Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1231
Joined: Apr. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 4:26 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Glide...(can really save your ass) - fits inside my TP roll.
Small superglue can save your boots.
Needle and dental floss - sew up anything.


--------------
mountain man who swims with trout
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 28
92hatchattack Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 238
Joined: May 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 5:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Is it really needed to pack a spare set of batteries if you go out with a fresh set?  I have a Black Diamond Storm. Its a little heavy at 4.2oz but I like it and will use the red lights a lot when doing astronomy stuff.  I was thinking instead of packing extra batteries and still facy the chance of a total unit failure I could take one of these little things as an emergency backup? http://www.rei.com/product....pecsTab

The toothbrush and toothpast set from Zpacks looks like a winner. Cheap and only .65o, less if you leave the case and extension at home. Thats hard to beat I think.   http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/toothbrush.shtml

Their pack covers seem crazy light as well. Sounds almost too good to be true.  http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/pack_cover.shtml

Hey Bigsilk, whats that knife weigh, and where did you get it it online?

Thanks all!
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 29
ashepabst Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1295
Joined: Jul. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 6:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

for a headlamp? it's unlikely you'll need spare batteries if you're starting fresh. the lamps i've owned just get dimmer as the batts wear thin --they wont just quit on you without warning.

but yeah, that's what i do... instead of bringing extra head lamp batts i just bring a spare light.


--------------
      /\    /\/\        / \       / \
 /\/   \ /      \  /\ /    \-^/    \^.   /\
/   \    \        \/  \       \ /       \ \ /  \ /\
     \     \       \    \       /          \/     /   \
                           \    /             \
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 30
Owen571 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1009
Joined: Apr. 2011
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2014, 7:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(92hatchattack @ Mar. 05 2014, 10:10 pm)
QUOTE
I dont even like cooking at home.

The point was that you don't always need the fancy "backpacker-specific" gear, and it isn't always the lightest or best, anyway.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
130 replies since Mar. 05 2014, 8:53 pm < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


Page 1 of 512345>>
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply All the small things...
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code



Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions