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Topic: Trekking poles...I don't want to assu, Starting the quest< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
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Woods Pouncer
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 07 2014, 11:16 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

..ume that BD are the only thing out there but that's all I hear about these days.

I've had a pair of Leki Ultralight Ti poles with the cork handles for years. They have served their purpose for well past their lifetime...but they are starting to show wear that is beyond repair. They don't collapse without struggle and have a few bends (that I have unbent). Before they fail completely, I'd like to get myself a new set of poles.

I've been looking at the Black Diamond Trail Pro, the Alpine Carbon Cork, and the Ultra Mountain Carbon poles. I have heard to many raves about the flick lock feature to ignore it.

I'd rather side toward strength than weight as I use them in rough terrain 80% of the time. I am not interested in "bells and whistles". I am even wondering if I really care about height adjustment although I do want/need collapse feature.

Any others I should be looking at?


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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 07 2014, 11:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Given rough terrain and your lack of interest in saving weight maybe look at their alloy poles? Not sure about the current state but there was a time carbon didn't handle getting nicked very well. And slamming a pole into talus blocks gets them nicked up, by me anyway.

So others like the Trail Pro's Al...

A ways down on this thread there's a comment from BD on carbon pole failures from nicking...

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 07 2014, 11:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use Fizan's.  I think they're Italian, been around a while but not very well-known in the U.S.  I bought them from outdoorGB.com.  They're aluminum but light -- my 'compact' length ones are around 11oz for the pair.  They have twist locks.  I've had them since 2011 with no issues.  I got them on sale and only paid about $70 for the pair (shipped from England even.)

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 08 2014, 12:40 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use Komperdell.

Just retired the ones I bought in 2008 -- they had twist locks with cork grips. The locks were starting to fail.  

Replaced them this spring with Komperdell Titanal Expedition poles. Aluminum alloy. Foam grip. Powerlock II (Komperdell's version of flick lock). 520 grams (about 18 ounces) for the pair. Have only used them for about 100 miles over mild terrain but seem fine so far. Heading out in a couple of days on a long hike over rugged terrain. Curious to see how they perform and how I like the foam grip but don't anticipate any problems.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 08 2014, 7:36 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have the BD Alpine Cork.  I've owned four different types of trekking poles.  These are the best yet.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 08 2014, 8:24 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

After using Komperdell and REI-branded Komperdell for years, breaking one, bending/unbending others, I got Black Diamond Carbon Alpine which so far have been less prone to slippage and I haven't managed to break them.  

My main preferences that drove the selection were for straight cork grips and no spring action.  I had heard good things about the Flic-Locs and they have so far seemed to be more solid than the Konperdell twist locks.  

Enjoy,


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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 08 2014, 8:49 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I also have the BD Alpine cork, or something like them - BD, cork handle, straight grips, fliplocks.  I went for the cork since I can sometimes develop hot spots on my hands with the rubber grips.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 08 2014, 2:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My only suggestion would be to stick with metal poles.  You can't unbend carbon fiber.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 08 2014, 3:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My old BD carbon Alpine poles with flic lock and still going strong. These are before the cork handles. They have about a zillion miles in rough country on them.

I think the issue is how sensitive you are to what is going on with the poles as in can you sense when they get stuck in a hole or between two rocks in time to let up, or do you just lever them over against the pressure. That is when they bend or break. The only poles I have ever broken was a Leki. They called it the titanium series but it was aluminum. I have had to replace the carbide tips on my BD carbon poles but that was after many years of use. I could only find Leki tips so replaced with those and all has been well for over a year now.

If it were me, I'd just get the BD carbon poles again if something happened to my current poles. Even girlfriend uses the same poles but with the cork grips. Her are somewhat newer than mine but still have years on them.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2014, 1:34 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Another happy BD Carbon Cork user.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2014, 3:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Last year I switched to the flick-lock version of the Leki poles you're retiring. I like them pretty well so far.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2014, 4:55 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TDale @ Jul. 08 2014, 12:04 pm)
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My only suggestion would be to stick with metal poles.  You can't unbend carbon fiber.

How do they bend in the first place, if they can't be unbent?  ???  :D

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2014, 7:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I will recommend Easton Outfitters poles, with their unique Rock Lock adjustment. Heavier but sturdy and solid.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 10 2014, 4:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use BD ski poles, never had a problem.  I think Leki may   have come out with pole that does not slip.  I bought mono pod, that slips, so I converted an old BD pole to be a mono pod.  I light wt. REI poles don't retighten if you loosen them up too far, unless you know how to fix them, they showed me how, but they both broke within 2 days in Yosemite.

Anyway these look interesting

http://thesummitregister.com/msr-sum....ns-pole

The trigger release might be a weak point? But should not slip if that does not break?


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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 17 2014, 11:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use BD contour elliptical for hard core stuff, but am switching to Helinox tension lock ones because they are super light and super compact. Very well made.  Not quite as stiff as the BD ones, but are suitable for trail hiking.
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