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Topic: It's time again for Edward Abbey quotes!, His epitaph: "No Comment"< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 05 2008, 2:18 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

“Society is like a stew. If you don't stir it up every once in a while then a layer of scum floats to the top.”


“Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell.”


“The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders.”


“Abolition of a woman's right to abortion, when and if she wants it, amounts to compulsory maternity: a form of rape by the State.”


"When a man's best friend is his dog, that dog has a problem”


“Belief in the supernatural reflects a failure of the imagination”


“Say what you like about my bloody murderous government,' I says, 'but don't insult me poor bleedin' country”


"Always question all authority."


"What is the purpose of the giant sequoia tree? The purpose of the giant sequoia tree is to provide shade for the tiny titmouse.”


“Grown men do not need leaders.”


O.K. I'll stop now. But, there are plenty more.


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 05 2008, 8:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I do not believe in personal immortality; it seems so unnecessary. Show me one man who deserves to live forever.
~
In the dog-eat-dog economy, the Doberman is boss.
~
The mad scientist was once only a creature of gothic romance; now he is everywhere, busy torturing atoms and animals in his laboratory.
~
They cannot see that growth for the sake of growth is a cancerous madness, that Phoenix and Albuquerque will not be better cities to live in when their populations are doubled again and again. They would never understand that an economic system which can only expand or expire must be false to all that is human.
~
The tragedy of modern war is not so much that the young men die but that they die fighting each other--instead of their real enemies back home in the capitals.


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If Light is in your heart, you will find your way Home. (Rumi)

The miracle is not to fly in the air, or to walk on the water, but to walk on the earth.  Chinese proverb

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 05 2008, 8:38 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A friend gave me a copy of one of his books and I bought every book of his I could find after. I remember exactly where I was when I heard he had died and felt a great sense of loss............. Yup, I shed a little water out of these eyes............. Ed was a guy that I understood.  His heart anyway...........

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 13 2012, 4:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Here's another good one by Abbey.

One final paragraph of advice: do not burn yourselves out. Be as I am — a reluctant enthusiast... a part-time crusader, a half-hearted fanatic. Save the other half of yourselves and your lives for pleasure and adventure. It is not enough to fight for the land; it is even more important to enjoy it. While you can. While it’s still here. So get out there and hunt and fish and mess around with your friends, ramble out yonder and explore the forests, climb the mountains, bag the peaks, run the rivers, breathe deep of that yet sweet and lucid air, sit quietly for a while and contemplate the precious stillness, the lovely, mysterious, and awesome space. Enjoy yourselves, keep your brain in your head and your head firmly attached to the body, the body active and alive, and I promise you this much; I promise you this one sweet victory over our enemies, over those desk-bound men and women with their hearts in a safe deposit box, and their eyes hypnotized by desk calculators. I promise you this; You will outlive the bastards.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 13 2012, 4:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(desert dweller @ Jan. 13 2012, 4:17 pm)
QUOTE
Here's another good one by Abbey.

One final paragraph of advice: do not burn yourselves out. Be as I am — a reluctant enthusiast... a part-time crusader, a half-hearted fanatic. Save the other half of yourselves and your lives for pleasure and adventure. It is not enough to fight for the land; it is even more important to enjoy it. While you can. While it’s still here. So get out there and hunt and fish and mess around with your friends, ramble out yonder and explore the forests, climb the mountains, bag the peaks, run the rivers, breathe deep of that yet sweet and lucid air, sit quietly for a while and contemplate the precious stillness, the lovely, mysterious, and awesome space. Enjoy yourselves, keep your brain in your head and your head firmly attached to the body, the body active and alive, and I promise you this much; I promise you this one sweet victory over our enemies, over those desk-bound men and women with their hearts in a safe deposit box, and their eyes hypnotized by desk calculators. I promise you this; You will outlive the bastards.

my favorite

has been at the top of my website since 2003


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 13 2012, 9:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

yeah i really need to pick up one of his books.I have a hard time reading any fiction though.I seem to be only able to read history and biographies.Im reading the 'The modern middle east' right now.Excellent book.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 13 2012, 10:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Edward Abbey wrote more than fiction

Try Desert Solitaire or Abbey's Road


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 13 2012, 11:20 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(tarol @ Jan. 13 2012, 10:01 pm)
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Edward Abbey wrote more than fiction

Yes, and for me the non-fiction was most worth reading.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 14 2012, 3:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hey D-D

Thanks for this; it's always a treat to see Abbey's lines. What an artful vision.

"Life is cruel? Compared to what?"

Cheers

Carl


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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 24 2013, 12:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have a 40 minute bus ride to work so I get a chance to do a lot of reading. Today, I started rereading one of Ed Abbey's book of essays called "Beyond the Wall". Here is a quote from the Preface.

“Beyond the wall of the unreal city, beyond the security fences topped with barbed wire and razor wire, beyond the asphalt belting of superhighways, beyond the cemented banksides of our temporarily stopped and mutilated rivers, beyond the rage of lies that poisons the air, there is another world waiting for you. It is the old true world of the deserts, the mountains, the forests, the islands, the shores the open plains. Go there. Be there. Walk gently and quietly deep within it. And then—

May your trails be dim, lonesome, stony, narrow, winding and only slightly uphill. May the wind bring rain for the slickrock potholes fourteen miles on the other side of yonder blue ridge. May God’s dog serenade your campfire, may the rattlesnake and screech owl amuse your reverie, may the Great Sun dazzle your eyes by day and the Great Bear watch over you by night.”


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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 24 2013, 1:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Old Ed Abbey.  I've got two---

"Hope springs eternal in the male gonad."

"Why is it that the destruction of something created by humans is called vandalism, yet the destruction of something created by God is called development?"


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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 24 2013, 2:12 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tipi Walter @ Jul. 24 2013, 1:19 pm)
QUOTE
Old Ed Abbey.  I've got two---

"Hope springs eternal in the male gonad."

"Why is it that the destruction of something created by humans is called vandalism, yet the destruction of something created by God is called development?"

Ed makes an excellent point, of course.

But it does remind of another saying:

God blessed you with a beautiful place here.
He certainly did.  But you should have seen this place when I left it all to God.

It seems we've got to learn to find a happy middle ground.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 24 2013, 2:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A drink a day keeps the shrink away
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 24 2013, 2:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If Ed stood for anything, it was about the importance of wilderness. He despised a certain religious predilection for turning all the Earth into a garden.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 24 2013, 2:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Ecocentric @ Jul. 24 2013, 2:22 pm)
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If Ed stood for anything, it was about the importance of wilderness. He despised a certain religious predilection for turning all the Earth into a garden.

I wasn't talking about a garden.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 24 2013, 2:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(KenV @ Jul. 24 2013, 2:39 pm)
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(Ecocentric @ Jul. 24 2013, 2:22 pm)
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If Ed stood for anything, it was about the importance of wilderness. He despised a certain religious predilection for turning all the Earth into a garden.

I wasn't talking about a garden.

I think that you are missing the context of Abbey's rejection of humans thinking that they can improve on nature. Have you read any Abby? I can't imagine you being a fan.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 24 2013, 3:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Good man, Edward Abby.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 25 2013, 1:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Ecocentric @ Jul. 24 2013, 2:47 pm)
QUOTE

(KenV @ Jul. 24 2013, 2:39 pm)
QUOTE

(Ecocentric @ Jul. 24 2013, 2:22 pm)
QUOTE
If Ed stood for anything, it was about the importance of wilderness. He despised a certain religious predilection for turning all the Earth into a garden.

I wasn't talking about a garden.

I think that you are missing the context of Abbey's rejection of humans thinking that they can improve on nature. Have you read any Abby? I can't imagine you being a fan.

Great guy.  I personally am a fan of a lot of what he said.  And opposed to some other parts.  He was a bit radical on some subjects for my liking and I did not like his anarchist political views, but his heart was certainly in the right place, especially as it related to our environment.

Do you really think that Ed Abbey thought it was always impossible for humans to improve on nature?  Where I live there are LOTS of invasive non-native species.  Are you saying Ed Abbbey would be opposed to humans  removing them?  Or would he want to just let nature take its course?
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 25 2013, 1:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That's a good question, and I don't know the answer. He did chuck beer cans out the window of his car for future generations to mine. Mitigating invasives is somewhat controversial among pro-conservation types. I'm staunchly in favor of removing them and using herbicides to do so. After all, they are a result of humans introducing and helping them to spread. I know some that think so long as they contribute services to the ecosystem, such as feeding birds that they are no worse then the remedy of using herbicides.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 25 2013, 2:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Ecocentric @ Jul. 25 2013, 1:54 pm)
QUOTE
That's a good question, and I don't know the answer. He did chuck beer cans out the window of his car for future generations to mine. Mitigating invasives is somewhat controversial among pro-conservation types. I'm staunchly in favor of removing them and using herbicides to do so. After all, they are a result of humans introducing and helping them to spread. I know some that think so long as they contribute services to the ecosystem, such as feeding birds that they are no worse then the remedy of using herbicides.

By the same token, I favor human created "managed burns" to reduce duff and undergrowth in forest areas.  In other areas I favor humans intervening to control some animal species (although poisoning streams to kill hybrid rainbow trout seems excessive).  In other places humans can remove human structures (like dams and levees) and not wait for nature to remove them.  For me, there are LOTS of things man can (and SHOULD) do to "improve on nature" without turning the place  into a "garden".
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 25 2013, 3:07 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(KenV @ Jul. 25 2013, 1:09 pm)
QUOTE
Great guy.  I personally am a fan of a lot of what he said.  And opposed to some other parts.  He was a bit radical on some subjects for my liking and I did not like his anarchist political views, but his heart was certainly in the right place, especially as it related to our environment.

Do you really think that Ed Abbey thought it was always impossible for humans to improve on nature?  Where I live there are LOTS of invasive non-native species.  Are you saying Ed Abbbey would be opposed to humans  removing them?  Or would he want to just let nature take its course?

Most invasive species are due to man and capitalism.  The woolly adelgid came over here from Japan in 1920 and has totally destroyed the hemlocks forest here in East TN and NC.  The chestnut blight came over in 1900 from, you guessed it, Japan.

So, count human wisdom or lack of it for these travesties.  Can humans improve on nature?  Hell no.  What's another invasive species to the North American continent?  European Man.  Has he done massive damage to the ecosystem?  Just look around.  Has he been harvested or culled?  Heck no.

Excessive human populations eat up the environment.  This is a no brainer.  By 2050 there will be 450 million Americans.  

In fact, here's another favorite quote from dear old Ed---

"The most common form of terrorism in the U.S.A. is that carried on by bulldozers and chain saws."
– Edward Abbey


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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 25 2013, 5:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(KenV @ Jul. 25 2013, 2:51 pm)
QUOTE

(Ecocentric @ Jul. 25 2013, 1:54 pm)
QUOTE
That's a good question, and I don't know the answer. He did chuck beer cans out the window of his car for future generations to mine. Mitigating invasives is somewhat controversial among pro-conservation types. I'm staunchly in favor of removing them and using herbicides to do so. After all, they are a result of humans introducing and helping them to spread. I know some that think so long as they contribute services to the ecosystem, such as feeding birds that they are no worse then the remedy of using herbicides.

By the same token, I favor human created "managed burns" to reduce duff and undergrowth in forest areas.  In other areas I favor humans intervening to control some animal species (although poisoning streams to kill hybrid rainbow trout seems excessive).  In other places humans can remove human structures (like dams and levees) and not wait for nature to remove them.  For me, there are LOTS of things man can (and SHOULD) do to "improve on nature" without turning the place  into a "garden".

I wrote an essay several years ago titled "The Garden Planet," which explored some of these management issues. The irony is that most of the mitigation required now is to correct for poor management decisions made decades or centuries ago. Fire suppression being the one that is on everyone mind these days. I met a plant pathologist in Canada that did produce inspections at the border. They are lucky if they stop 1% of the pests and disease the crosses the border.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 26 2013, 4:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Love the quotes.  Abbey has really grown on me, I'm reading Beyond the Wall right now and enjoying it.  I don't always agree with him, but he had a unique voice and some very important insights about wilderness and the ways humans relate to it, as demonstrated by the quotes above.  FWIW, I strongly disagree with the notion that humans can improve on nature.  We can serve as good stewards, but we cannot in any way improve it.  Maybe just an issue of semantics, but to me it's an important distinction.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 26 2013, 8:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(desert dweller @ Aug. 05 2008, 12:18 pm)
QUOTE
“Abolition of a woman's right to abortion, when and if she wants it, amounts to compulsory maternity: a form of rape by the State.”

That's an equally disgusting and sad perspective...


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(Trinity @ Jul. 26 2013, 4:18 pm)
QUOTE
Love the quotes.  Abbey has really grown on me, I'm reading Beyond the Wall right now and enjoying it.  I don't always agree with him, but he had a unique voice and some very important insights about wilderness and the ways humans relate to it, as demonstrated by the quotes above.  FWIW, I strongly disagree with the notion that humans can improve on nature.  We can serve as good stewards, but we cannot in any way improve it.  Maybe just an issue of semantics, but to me it's an important distinction.

Maybe it is semantics, but to me a good steward does not just sit idly by and watch nature take its course.  Especially when the bad stewards and rapists of the land have done their thing.  To me, a good steward will intervene in nature's behalf to undo what they have done.

And even good stewards make mistakes.  For generations it was assumed that fire is always bad.  Now we understand that fire can often not only be good, but even critically necessary for a healthy econ system.  To me, a good steward will try to undo what has been done, even when it was done in the name of good stewardship.  He does not just let nature take its course and wait for the land to heal.   To me a good steward acts like a physician to help the land to heal.

Again, maybe its semantics, but its worth discussing.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 21 2013, 10:39 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Read this one snippet this morning on the bus ride to work. It's from Beyond the Wall. He's observing how the native population in northern Alaska all drive snow mobiles or ATVs.

"Girls love horses. Little boys love machines. Grown-up men and women like to walk."


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