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Topic: Bike Tour - Trip Report< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 21 2012, 6:46 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Disclaimer:   This is really, really long.  Sorry about that.  It’s my third attempt to cut it down but I guess it was just such a good trip that I have a lot to say.  My apologies for being a bit of bore.
But then, you don’t have to read it all. I won’t be insulted if you just  look at the photos.  


On August 3, 2012 I embarked on a journey that has been a long time ambition and dream of mine – an extended, self supported bicycle tour.  I opted to go alone for a couple of reasons.  First, it’s hard to find anyone to commit to a long distance ride and secondly, as the saying goes, “I find myself good company and others often don’t.”  Originally, I had planned a cross country trip from San Francisco to Washington, D.C.  However, a myriad of problems arose that prevented me from taking that route.  I finally settled on a trip from my home in southern Montana down through Yellowstone and the Tetons and then across to Idaho Falls and up to and through Bozeman where I would visit my three sons before turning east and heading home.  So on a somewhat drizzly day – ironic since it was the first rain we’d had in nearly two months and it had to be on the day I left.  But I wasn’t to be put off any longer and in spite of less than ideal riding conditions, I headed south to Red Lodge, MT and the Beartooth Highway on my way to Yellowstone.  The weather turned out to be not bad at all and after one of the trip’s few restaurant dinners in Red Lodge late that afternoon, I headed south out of town to the campgrounds in the Custer NF.  It again started to drizzle and I was not looking forward to setting up camp in the rain, when about 5 miles out of town, I spied an abandoned cabin/shack with a porch over the front and side.  I must have passed it a thousand times in my car, but never really noticed it until now.  Guess that’s one of the advantages of traveling by bike – you notice a lot more about your surroundings.  Anyway, the porch seemed like a lot better option than setting up my tent in the rain.  The weather remained ominous when I laid out my sleeping bag on the porch went to bed and I was dubious about crossing the nearly 11,000 ft Beartooth Pass the next day.  It would be tough under the best of conditions let alone in the rain.  However, I slept well in spite of temperatures that hovered around freezing and the next morning I woke to absolutely clear skies and no wind.  I started the nearly 5,300 ft climb to the pass and was soon met by Janice, my wife, and her sister about half way up.  I had phoned them that morning asking them to bring some additional warm clothes, anticipating some colder temperatures in Yellowstone that I had counted on.  Since we only live about an hour away, they were happy to comply.  After a picnic lunch with them and collecting a warmer hat and synthetic vest (both which I used extensively over the course of the trip) I headed up the pass.  Actually, this proved the most challenging day of the ride, but in late afternoon I crested the 10,947 ft  Beartooth Pass in absolutely splendid weather.  So nice in fact, that I laid down in the tundra at the side of the road and took an hour nap.  Rarely have I had such beautiful weather on top the pass.  This was a harbinger of things to come since I had incredibly great weather for almost the entire trip.  Now, I know drought is not good and causes hardship for lots of  people, but let’s face it, for bicycle touring, it’s nice.  After my nap I cruised on down the west side of the pass in absolutely fabulous weather enjoying some of the best riding I’ve ever experienced and made my way to the Island Lake campground in Gallatin NF where I shared a campsite with a school teacher from Wisconsin.  That evening we shared his beer, stories from our careers and a mutual disgust with Scott Walker.

The next morning dawned clear and bright and I started on the long decent through Cooke City, MT into Yellowstone. Again, the riding was absolutely wonderful. After spending nearly 20 minutes in line to enter the park, all the time being surrounded by other bikes  (but they were Harleys and BMWs) I cruised on into the Pebble Creek campground where I stayed at the hiker/bicyclist site.  As was the case in nearly every campground in Yellowstone, I was the only occupant of the hiker/biker site which surprised me somewhat.  I really had expected to encounter more bicyclist but came across relatively few.  The morning was partly cloudy but I continued on through the Lamar Valley where I encountered numerous bison, elk, deer and delightfully, two wolves.  By the time I reached Tower Junction around noon it was threatening rain and as I started up the second long climb of the trip - 16 miles long, 8859 ft Dunraven Pass, it began to rain but only moderately.  This continued for the entire climb. Just as I reached the top of the pass the sun broke through.  I spent a short time resting at the summit before beginning the four mile descent into Canyon where I planned on spending the night. Just as I got to the Canyon campground and had my tent set up the weather turned and it started to rain and sleet, accompanied by heavy winds.  I spent a comfortable evening reading in my one man tent and when it cleared up in the late evening, I cooked my dinner and met another hiker/biker – a guy from Romania who was touring the park by hitch-hiking . He turned out to be a great guy and interesting campmate and we shared lots of stories.  Since the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is one of my favorite areas of the park, I stayed there a second night after riding both the South and North Rim trails/roads.  The next several days and nights took me through Old Faithful, West Thumb, Grant Village and then south toward the Tetons after twice crossing the Continental Divide.   Again, the weather was great - warm, clear and no wind.  I entered Grand Teton National Park in the late afternoon and by the time I arrived at the Colter Bay hiker/biker campground, it was raining hard again. However, after about two hours it cleared and I spent an enjoyable evening along the shores of Jackson Lake and taking in the ranger presentation which actually, was quite good.  That was to be the last rain of any significance I encountered the entire trip. The next day I only rode 22 miles to the hiker/biker campground at Jenny Lake where I spend a sunny and pleasant day lounging at the lake and resting.  At Jenny Lake I picked up the beautiful bike trail that parallels the Teton  Range and the weather and riding were just fantastic.  To ride along the face of the Tetons in 70+ degree weather with clear skies and no wind is the absolute epitome, at least to me, of bicycle riding.  It was just fabulous.  An experience I’ll never forget.  However, it was here, as well, that I began to experience the one down side of the trip – smoke.  Huge forest fires to the west in Idaho had sent smoke east over the Rockies creating what was to be a constant haze.  What should have been spectacularly clear views were obscured again and again by an ever present pale of smoke.  I was to be plagued with the smoke until I reached Washington state, west of the Rockies.  Still, to me it was a minor irritant considering everything else.  

After Jenny Lake I continued on the bike path into Jackson where I met Daniel, a 26 year cyclist from D.C., who was riding from Helena to Albuquerque along the Continental Divide.  We spent the day – which was about all I could take of Jackson – together and then stealth camped that night, after several beers (but not at the Cowboy Bar), in a city park on the outskirts of town just below the Snow King ski area.   Next morning we went our separate ways  - he to the south and I to the west, to Idaho Falls. I had always wanted to see the Snake River Canyon so instead of heading directly west over Teton Pass, I opted for the longer route south and east through the canyon.  It was spectacular riding.  The canyon is incredibly gorgeous and the riding all gradual downhill for miles and miles on a wide shoulder with little traffic.  Again, just wonderful bicycling.  For the rest of trip I seemed to be, with a few exceptions, in the constant company of beautiful rivers – the Snake, the Salmon, the South Payette, the North Payette, the Little Salmon, the Spokane, the Coeur d’Alene, the Clark’s Fork, the Blackfoot, the Little Blackfoot, the Missouri, the Gallatin and finally, the Yellowstone. Trust me, they make for wonderful traveling companions and I developed a great affinity for them as I rode along their banks and through their valleys.  I continued on through the Snake River Canyon to Idaho Falls where I spent two days with an old teaching friend of mine.  At this point I had originally planned on turning north and heading home.  However, I was having such a wonderful time and things were going so well, that I phoned Janice, my wife, and told her I was heading northwest through Idaho to visit our daughter, Lindsey, and her husband in Spokane.  She had no objections so off I headed across the northern fringe of the Snake Rive Plain toward the Craters of the Moon National Monument.  This turned out to be my longest day – 96 miles.  Since the country is absolutely desolate with absolutely nothing there I just wanted to get through it. The only attraction in the whole stretch is a historical site near Arco featuring the first nuclear reactor constructed for peaceful use.  I spent a day and two nights in the surreal landscape of Craters of the Moon before heading into the mountains and on to Ketchum, Sun Valley and Stanley, ID.  Again, the landscape was just fabulous and the riding beyond great.  I spent a day and half in Sun Valley before proceeding up the Salmon and South Payette Rivers.  I’ve got to say that Idaho has some of the most spectacular rivers I’ve ever seen, as was evidenced by the countless rafters I constantly witnessed floating them.  Another attraction Idaho has is an abundance of natural hot springs – the most of any state - which I took full advantage of every change I got.  Trust me, they’re great after 60-70 miles in the saddle.  At the little town of Bates, ID I turned north for the long climb up the North Payette River.  Like all the others, it was tremendously scenic.  So much so, I often forgot I was actually working so hard climbing for 25+ miles.  After passing through the pleasant resort town of McCall, I spent a really relaxing night at the campsite at low key Zims Hot Springs Resort (don’t miss it if you’re in the area) before heading north to Moscow, ID where I stayed with  friends for the night.  The next day it was on to Washington and the beautiful wheat country of the Palouse Hills.  These rolling hills are some of the richest agricultural land in the west as was evidenced by the numerous immaculate farms and spacious farm houses.  It’s only 80 miles from Moscow to my daughter’s home in Spokane so it was a relatively long but easy ride through beautiful country to her home.  I arrived in Spokane at just about 5:15 p.m., right on time for rush hour, but managed to find her and Dan’s house without any trouble.  I spend the next three days with them, being wined and dined and taking in Spokane’s sights via my bike before heading east and home.  From downtown Spokane, I followed the Centennial bike trail which extends some 30+  miles east to Coeur d’ Alene, ID.  It’s great riding along the Spokane River right to the shores of Lake Coeur d’ Alene.  After a pleasant afternoon in Coeur d’ Alene drinking a few beers and generally resting, I headed south.  While in Spokane, I had heard of the Trail of the Coeur d’ Alene’s  which is a paved bike trail along Lake Coeur d’ Alene and the Coeur d’ Alene River that extends almost to the Montanan/Idaho border.  Locals claimed it to be the most  beautiful bike trail in the northwest and while I was somewhat skeptical since I had previously passed through so much beautiful country, I wasn’t to be disappointed.  In many ways, it was the highlight of the trip. All I can say it that the Trail of the Coeur d’ Alene’s is incredible.  Over 74 flat miles (it’s an old railroad bed) of paved bike trail through thick forests, along lake and river shores, through small towns, historic mining districts and mountains.  If you bicycle, surely put it on your list.  The trail ended in Mullan, ID, a few miles from the Montana border.  From Mullan, I picked up the Northern Pacific multiuse trail and for the first time, had  to walk my bike, not so much because of the steep grade but because the trail was so rough and full of boulders. The walk, however, was for only about ¾ of a mile before I picked up the old Northern Pacific RR grade which, while it was gravel, was quite nice riding.  This trail took me to Lookout Pass on the MT/ID border.  From here I experienced my first interstate riding on I-90, riding for about 6 miles until near the bottom of the pass, I followed a forest service road for about half a mile and then just pulled into the forest and camped.  The next morning dawned cold and threatening rain.  Fortunately, the rain held off and by noon I was riding under clear skies on frontage roads through the beautiful and heavily forested valleys and mountains of western Montana.  I followed the Clark’s Fork River, the largest since the Snake, and eventually reached Missoula where I spent my first and only night in a motel, a hostel actually.  It was full of interesting world travelers and to top it off, it was the first week of the University of Montana’s fall session so the students were out in full force especially since Missoula was holding it annual micro brew fest.  There were thousands of people, mostly students in various states of intoxication, on the streets all night.  Several of us at the hostel wandered downtown to take in the festivities. It was an entertaining evening to say the least.  Ah, for the wasted days of my youth.  I left Missoula the next day via the Big Blackfoot River, of  “A River Runs Through It” fame – the acclaimed fly fishing novel by Norman MacClean.  Another beautiful ride through an incredible valley.  I spent a night with a cousin in Avon, MT and then headed east along the Little Blackfoot River, then over the Continental Divide via McDonald Pass and on into Helena where I spent the afternoon.  The next day I continued south to Three Forks, MT where I camped for the night.  The next day I would ride the 40 miles into Bozeman and stay with my three sons for a couple of days.  After treating Jeremy, Caleb and Matt to dinner two nights in a row,  I decided it was time to head east (it was getting expensive) over the Bozeman Pass to the Yellowstone Valley and the 144 miles home.  After a final night of camping in a roadside campground, I headed to my home in Billings and arrived on September 14 (1,976 miles and exactly six weeks after my departure)  concluding what was one of the best experiences of my life. And while I had some long days and some hard days, I never had a bad day.  Really, I can’t think of much of anything I would change.  I wouldn’t say it was life changing, but it certainly opened up a whole new world to me that is every bit as rewarding as hiking and backpacking – in some ways very similar, yet very different as well.   I can’t wait until next summer where I already have another long tour in mind.  Only problem is, it does cut into my backpacking season.

Thanks for reading.  I could say a lot more, but I’ve rambled way too long already.

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"Too often I have met men who boast only of how many miles they've traveled and not of what they've seen."  -  Louis L'Amour
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 21 2012, 6:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Great report, thank you very much for the time to put it together !

Not only that; you finally learned to add photos  ! !


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 21 2012, 7:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Fantastic trip, great report.  Many thanks.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 21 2012, 7:20 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for all you wrote, and some really nice pics, too.  I am familiar with most of the countryside you rode through, but as you say, it is much different from driving through.  

Now, you have added a trail on my list for my recumbent.  Coeur d’ Alene is not all that far of a drive from here.

One of the nice things about biking trails is that often they open up before the snow melts out of the high country, so we can bike a month or 2 before we can BP. 


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 21 2012, 7:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

OK Jer, I didn't read your story through because I'm beat from a weekend of backpack elk hunting... what I will say is I saw your ancient Cannondale Panniers and had a flashback! I had those same Panniers circa 1976!

But mine were red :)

Cool... you da' man! I loved bike touring back then and look forward to doing it again.


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 21 2012, 10:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Great report Jer. Thanks for sharing. Sounds like you had a great time. Great pics too.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 21 2012, 10:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(BradMT @ Oct. 21 2012, 7:22 pm)
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what I will say is I saw your ancient Cannondale Panniers and had a flashback! I had those same Panniers circa 1976!

Brad,

You're not the only person to comment on the age of the panniers.  They were quite the conversation topic among a number of experienced cyclists.  Most younger ones had never seen anything like them.  Truth is, I picked them up dirt cheap at a garage sale over 35 years ago and never used them.  They were brand new at the time.  Just sat in my garage all that time until now.  I did some modification on the attachment system and they worked very well.  No problems at all except for blowing  a zipper seam (easily fixed) but that was because I was simply over stuffing the pannier.  I did have a seamstress friend make the rain covers for the panniers  as they are not waterproof at all.


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 21 2012, 10:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Great trip, thanks for posting!  Just increases my itch to do something similar, though I want my spouse to come with (a challenge a at this point he's not much of a biker).  Sadly, as a female, I don't think id be comfortable doing it alone (I'm fine in the backcountry, but going through towns and such. . . ).

So glad you got to do a great trip after all!


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 21 2012, 11:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That was just great.  I'm very familar with most of your route (much of it covers some of my favorite places in the world), and loved "seeing" it from a biker's perspective.  
My husband and I have been thinking about biking the Trail of the Coeur d' Alene next year, with our kids who will be 4 and 6, so I was really glad to read how much you enjoyed it.  We'd probably use a bike trailer for the younger one, and a tagalong bike for the older one, and take several days.  Do you think that's a reasonable trip with kids?


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 21 2012, 11:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Outstanding Jer, thanks for taking us along with you

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 21 2012, 11:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Really cool. Wow.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 22 2012, 6:15 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Awesome. My uncle is actually fullfilling one of his dreams..he retired this year and is currently riding his bicycle accross the country. He started in California and is biking to Florida. He was planning on going solo, but 3 others joined him. They began in late September and as of a few days ago the other 3 have bailed out 1 by 1. He has no intentions of stopping though, as he originally planned on doing it solo anyway.  Well, I'm glad you did this trip for yourself. It's nice to see people doing things like this, kind of an inspiration for me. I have plans in my future and the first one is early retirement so I will be able to do what I have to do. Thanks again, nice TR and pictures.

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(hikerjer @ Oct. 21 2012, 8:19 pm)
QUOTE
Brad,

You're not the only person to comment on the age of the panniers.  They were quite the conversation topic among a number of experienced cyclists.  Most younger ones had never seen anything like them.  Truth is, I picked them up dirt cheap at a garage sale over 35 years ago and never used them.  They were brand new at the time.  Just sat in my garage all that time until now.  I did some modification on the attachment system and they worked very well.  No problems at all except for blowing  a zipper seam (easily fixed) but that was because I was simply over stuffing the pannier.  I did have a seamstress friend make the rain covers for the panniers  as they are not waterproof at all.

My brother had the old Bellwether panniers and I had Cannondale's... he and I put untold miles on our bikes doing tours back in the 70's. I always liked the Cannondale's, but got tired of them moving with me all over the country and not getting used, so I sold them.

Wish I hadn't!

You inspire me man, great photos and trip report.

Is that a BA tent? If so, what model and how did you like it?


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 22 2012, 10:09 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Jer, thank you for sharing and congrats on taking the trip!

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 22 2012, 12:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That was outstanding old chap, I quite enjoyed it. But you didn't ramble near enough in my opinion.

The Teton segment sounded surreal. The epitome of what bicycle touring can be indeed. And I need to try that some time I think.

Nineteen hundred and seventy six miles you say....Has your butt forgiven you yet! Man...
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 22 2012, 12:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Epic Jer, enjoyed the report.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 22 2012, 12:55 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Great report, sounds like you had a real good time! Thanks for sharing it with us.
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(BradMT @ Oct. 22 2012, 7:56 am)
QUOTE
Is that a BA tent? If so, what model and how did you like it?

Actually, the tent is a REI T1 Solo that I bought off a forum member for a $100 a couple of years ago.  I've been more than happy with it.  It performed flawlessly on this trip, not that I had much adverse weather to test it.  But I've had it in some pretty good storms in the mountains and it's held up well.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 22 2012, 1:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(BradMT @ Oct. 22 2012, 7:56 am)
QUOTE
Is that a BA tent? If so, what model and how did you like it?

Actually, the tent is a REI T1 Solo that I bought off a forum member for a $100 a couple of years ago.  I've been more than happy with it.  It performed flawlessly on this trip, not that I had much adverse weather to test it.  But I've had it in some pretty good storms in the mountains and it's held up well.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2012, 9:15 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Awesome report Jerry!  Having driven from Yellowstone to Red Lodge via the Beartooth Hwy I have to say, You da man!  That's a hell of a climb that you did!

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Good night Chesty, where ever you are!-(It's a Marine thing.)

“The deadliest weapon in the world is a Marine and his rifle!”
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mtngrl Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2012, 11:10 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What a great report, and I love the photos.  It's hard from me to start thinking of you as a cyclist, I'm so used to your wonderful hiking/backpacking reports, but this is a great report!  You were worried about it being too long, and I'm wanting more!  Wow, keep up these great adventures!!

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”Every tree was dripping and the creeks had swollen. It occurred to me that I had achieved a rare thing: I was living at the center of my heart’s geography. And I knew it.”- Bryce Andrews, Badluck Way
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2012, 11:18 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Looks like a great time!  What kind of wildlife did you see along the route?  Did you have to ride through any herds of bison on the Yellowstone roads?

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Dave Matthews
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tarol Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2012, 12:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Nice!

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mtngrl Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2012, 12:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

How funny about having the panniers for years and not using them.  Last winter, I went through my hiking/backpacking/ biking stuff and moved a lot of it , that I did not use, on.  I had a pair of panniers, bought new, years ago, and never used them, well, actually, I did use one a couple of times bike commuting to work.  Anyway, I did sell those red panniers for a little cash, and that's that.

I had to go back and read this a second time.  Egads, pedaling over Beartooth Pass, and Dunraven and up out of Old Faithful, just make my bum hurt.  Ah, but those downhills, wonderful!  Man, you put in some long days, seems to me.

What kind of bike training did you do?  Just out pedaling miles and miles?


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”Every tree was dripping and the creeks had swollen. It occurred to me that I had achieved a rare thing: I was living at the center of my heart’s geography. And I knew it.”- Bryce Andrews, Badluck Way
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2012, 12:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Friedancer:  I had to negotiate my way through bison on the road twice.  Once in the Lamar and once near Old Faithful.   They were in the rut so it was interesting.  The wildlife highlight, however, was seeing two wolves in the Lamar.

mtngrl: Some days were long and some short.  In Yellowstone an the Tetons, I tended to so short rides just from one campground to the next.  Later on during the return trip, mielage usually was 60-70 miles a day.  

As for training, I just rode my bike a lot around my home town with the panniers on and loaded.  Nothing too dramatic, just a lot of miles.  Actually, from a physical standpoint, the trip was far easier than I anticipated. In fact, everything about it was remarkable easy.  No physical problems and no mechanical problems - not even a single flat tire in 2000 miles.


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"Too often I have met men who boast only of how many miles they've traveled and not of what they've seen."  -  Louis L'Amour
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tRoLLin_mOtOr Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2012, 2:11 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Loved reading your report and seeing the photos. Thanks for taking the time to write that up and share it.

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SW Mtn backpacker Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2012, 2:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Great trip.  Did you have any problems securing camp sites (you mentioned one stealth camp)?

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In wildness is the preservation of the world. - Henry Thoreau
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2012, 3:13 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What a wonderful trip report. I enjoyed reading it. Any more long trips in your future?
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2012, 3:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Inspiring photos!
I'll come back and read the TR later.

Thanks for posting it.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2012, 3:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Very nice TR!

So what local brews did you enjoy in Missoula?

Rumi


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“This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all.”
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