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Topic: Winter Trail Etiquette, Snowshoes/Skis< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 10 2013, 4:00 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

How's it done? I guess you're not supposed to snowshoe in the ski tracks. Right next to them?
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 10 2013, 4:07 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yep, next to the ski tracks, but not too close. Look at where their poles hit the snow, and stay off to the side of that.  Snow shoes tend to sink deeper than skis, and that is why shoes avoid ski tracks.  

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 10 2013, 4:13 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Skiers like that nicely groomed path that their colleagues have made for them.  And snowshoes screw that up.

So it's not just that the shoes sink in deeper, but they wreck the trail for the skiers.

That's why skiers are touchy about the subject. It's polite to leave the ski trails the way you find them,


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 10 2013, 4:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(ol-zeke @ Feb. 10 2013, 2:07 pm)
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Yep, next to the ski tracks, but not too close. Look at where their poles hit the snow, and stay off to the side of that.  Snow shoes tend to sink deeper than skis, and that is why shoes avoid ski tracks.  

Yeah, I agree with Ol-zeke. To go beyond that, I try to leave the ski trail entirely. Sometimes that means climbing a hillside with my snowshoes.

There's one exception in my mind. Suppose you are not on a designated ski trail or route that skiers opened. And suppose snowshoers have gone to the trouble of packing a route. Just because a skier decides to follow that route does not mean following snowshoers must abandon it and stay off the "ski tracks".

If snowshoers opened the route in the first place, it seems to me that the skier is left to take his own chances with however rough it is. It is a snowshoe route now, or multiple use, you might say.

Personally, I just take off in fresh snow and not following anyone, and then I don't have to worry about it.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 10 2013, 4:34 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Stay as far away from the ski tracks as reasonably possible. And step off the trail entirely - if possible -  if the the skier's coming by.

I yield as much space as possible to skiers, as a general rule. :)
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 10 2013, 6:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

As a snowshoer I try and be as respectful and accommodating as possible and understand the purpose of maintaining tracks, but if its a narrow un-designated trail on public land [which most are in at least places in the Rockies] I will not compromise my safety for a skiers convenience. I've had a few skiers all but claim they own the forest and just about had to tear them a new posterior orifice but almost all of them understand if there's no other option they have to share the trail.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 10 2013, 9:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If it's a designated XC ski trail then I stay off to the side and away from the tracks. If it's a multi use trail then it's not so much of a big deal
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 10 2013, 10:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

This is one of those things which, IMO, gets blown waaaaay out of proportion to any actual problem.  On a designated XC ski trail then yes, stay off the ski tracks with your snowshoes.  Anywhere else it should not matter.  Again, just my opinion.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 10 2013, 10:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

And perhaps bare booter should avoid snowshoe tracks as well... but they never do n tend to trash the trails with such a terrable disregard.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 10 2013, 10:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Designated XC tracks near Santa Fe, I stay off of.  Popular multi-use areas (Aspen Rd which is gated in winter for snow recreation) sees the skiers usually first anyways after fresh snow, followed by snowshoers following each other, walkers following the snowshoers,  and finally dog walkers, with Fido laying a big ole ... hey, what about those LA Clippers?

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 10 2013, 11:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(double cabin @ Feb. 10 2013, 6:22 pm)
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t if its a narrow un-designated trail on public land [which most are in at least places in the Rockies] I will not compromise my safety for a skiers convenience.

I hear you DC.  I'm primarily a cross country skier but do snowshoe on occasion and I do understand the situation.  Many of the areas I x-country ski in are just as you described - narrow enough that there is really no other option but for snowshoers and skiers to use the same trail.   I understand that.  Truth be told, snowshoeing tracks really don't bother me that much while in the backcountry.  Sometimes, they just pack down the snow and improve the glide.  Mind you, I ski mostly in the backcountry and the trails aren't groomed so that may make a difference. But I guess we all have to learn to share the trail.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 11 2013, 8:25 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TravisNWood @ Feb. 10 2013, 4:30 pm)
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There's one exception in my mind. Suppose you are not on a designated ski trail or route that skiers opened. And suppose snowshoers have gone to the trouble of packing a route. Just because a skier decides to follow that route does not mean following snowshoers must abandon it and stay off the "ski tracks".

Amen.

A few years ago, we got hit with one storm right after another. Every morning and evening I'd break trail, sometimes waist-deep, up to 5 miles. I spit venom when skiiers yelled at me for walking on "their" trail.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 11 2013, 9:20 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'll stay off the tracks if it's a groomed XC ski trail.  If it's multiuse, like others, I'll try my best to stay out of already established tracks but won't compromise my safety for it.  For the most part I try my best to choose trails that are hiking only or places where off trail travel is permitted (it isn't everywhere here).

At our local arboretum we have designated hiking/snowshoe trails in addition to the (non-groomed) ski/run trails - it always peeves me to see ski tracks on them.  They are clearly marked for skiers to stay off.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 11 2013, 3:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

hikerjer --

I hear you DC.  I'm primarily a cross country skier but do snowshoe on occasion and I do understand the situation.  Many of the areas I x-country ski in are just as you described - narrow enough that there is really no other option but for snowshoers and skiers to use the same trail.   I understand that.  Truth be told, snowshoeing tracks really don't bother me that much while in the backcountry.  Sometimes, they just pack down the snow and improve the glide.  Mind you, I ski mostly in the backcountry and the trails aren't groomed so that may make a difference. But I guess we all have to learn to share the trail.

Yes, I agree with hikerjer and DC.  I've been on far more trails packed-down by snowshoes, than those thin trails left by XC skis, and skiers have enjoyed those wider, packed-down trails.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 11 2013, 3:26 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(camper10469 @ Feb. 10 2013, 10:28 pm)
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And perhaps bare booter should avoid snowshoe tracks as well... but they never do n tend to trash the trails with such a terrable disregard.

They may never where you're at or have been, but I for one have been bare bootin it and avoided ski tracks in some of the rare instances I see them. We do not get enough snow or do we have designated cc ski trails. Kindly do not lump all us bare booters in your seemingly irresponsible catagory.   :D
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 11 2013, 3:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I solve the problem by being the first guy to hit the powder. No tracks, no problem.
I agree with what others have said once an established path has been stomped down, but can't remember the last time I was anywhere near a groomed track.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 11 2013, 4:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Trail runners on groomed XC tracks get to me.  He had no idea what I was talking about and really did not care except when I blocked the trail and caused him to stop.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 11 2013, 4:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

As a personal rule, I just try to keep away from skiers' trails. Less hassle.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 11 2013, 5:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

oldnolder..

maybe where you are there isn't enough snow to care about bare booting. But here in the NE we do get enough deep snow to care if bare booters are post holing leg breakers.

In fact the Adorondaks has a law to use snowshoes in anything over 6". In the Catskills there are no laws yet but they will be putting em in place soon enough as more n more BBers trash trails.  

It is inconcderate and a shame we need laws to make people accountable for their disregard for others safety.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 18 2013, 11:46 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Better than the lady with the horse that went in and post-holed through groomed ski tracks at a popular place around here about 10 years ago.  She was an outfitter, and should have known better.  My letter to the editor cost her some business.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 18 2013, 12:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Groomed versus non-groomed trails,

I stay clear of the groomed trails when on snow shoes.  
I will do my best to stay out of the ski tracks on non-groomed trails, but sometimes it's unavoidable.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 18 2013, 4:20 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I would never snowshoe or hike on a trail designated solely for cross country skiing regardless of whether it is groomed or not.  On multi-use trails I try to avoid the ski tracks when possible but I'm not going out of my way to to do so.  When there is snow I use snow shoes, many times even when there isn't enough snow to make snowshoes all that useful.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 18 2013, 8:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(nogods @ Feb. 18 2013, 1:20 pm)
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I would never snowshoe or hike on a trail designated solely for cross country skiing regardless of whether it is groomed or not.

Maybe it's different in your area.
I'm not aware of any un-groomed trails that are "solely for cross country skiing", but perhaps they exist elsewhere.
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