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Topic: Camera filters & hoods..., A can of worms?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 6:31 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

To begin with, I am not a paid photographer or anything of the such. I enjoy taking pictures both on the trail as well as off the trail, of mountains, the trails themselves and of course backpacking gear. I also like to shoot video of any of the above... I use these photos and videos for my blog (which is not a professional thing by any means) and of course my YouTube channel.

My understanding of all the settings on cameras are a bit limited. My wife started getting into the whole photography thing a while back, but due to a lack of time has not really pursued it. I wouldn't mind learning how to get more familiar with camera settings and learning all the cool little tricks to create some awesome shots, but the fact of the matter is, I am a slow learner, not to mention hard-headed... I am more of a hands on kinda learner... reading about all the different settings and what not make my head swim, so I just try to find something simple, and as close to telling me step by step and go from there...

So, saying all of that, I finally got around to getting the Panasonic Lumix GF2 with the 14mm f/2.5 lens. (This is a camera that I had been wanting for a while.) It started out a few years ago when Ray recommend the Lumix FH20 camera, which I loved and I felt like it was a great camera (especially at the price I got it for). However, I ended up ruining the lens on the camera... (not going there, just trust me, it is ruined...) So, I replaced it with a Lumix SZ7, and well, I have just not been as happy with it. So, I have been wanting another one... In the meantime, I had the opportunity to check out the GF2 and felt right at home with it since the menus and settings were almost identical to what the FH20 was (to a degree). And after I had seen some of the photo's that he shot with it, I felt like it was what I wanted to step up to. (The Sony Nex-5, or 7, was really pushed on me too, but there were a few reasons that I decided against it... namely $$ and because I was more comfortable with using the GF2.)

So, to me, the GF2 is an expensive camera ($350). I choose the pancake lens for size and weight over the 14-42 mm lens, however, I have heard very good things about the 20 mm f/1.7 lens and will be saving up for it next.

However, I have plans to actually take care of this camera when on the trail, damn the weight (ok, to an extent...) I have a ZPacks multipack that I will be converting to a camera bag and will be cutting some pieces of 1/4" pad to line it and create chambers in it to snuggly hold the camera. As well, the multipack is about 95% waterproof (all seams are taped except seams underneath.) But I also plan to carry a water proof bag to store the camera in for times that it is also raining, inside the multipack.

So, on to my topic...

I had thought about getting 2 filters for the camera,

1. B+W Clear UV Haze with MRC filter
2. B+W ND 0.6 Single Coating filter

I was also looking at getting a hood for the camera.

But, when researching about different filters, wow, I found out that there are some pretty big flame wars about them, and now I wonder if I should spend $65 on these 2 filters, or just stick with the $7 hood...

I like the idea of how filters claim to both protect the filter as well as reduce this or that: block UV with the UV filter, which I hear doesn't really matter anymore with digital cameras?

I also read that filters are better for using as coasters since they also degrade the photo being taken... although some say that the level of degradation is very minute and hard to spot unless really blowing the photo up (which is not what I need to do really).

I have also read that a hood is all that one needs since it will protect the lens to some degree, as well as block some of the light from entering in and washing out the photo...

So, I figured I would come on hear and ask some backpackers what they recommend when using a camera on the trail. As I mentioned, I am going to "attempt" to very careful with it on the trail, but as we all know, this is not guaranteed... accidents happen. So maybe it is better to say that I am going to be more conscientious of taking care of the camera than my other ones, which I simply threw in my front pocket and took off...

And like I said, my knowledge on the subject is quite limited, so please don't use big words when responding...  :)

Thanks everyone!


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 7:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The only filter I've considered worth spending money on is a multi-coated circular polarizing filter.  Good coatings are worth the extra money, IMO.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 8:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks Big Load. Here is a CP filter that I was also looking at:

B+W 46mm Kaeseman Circular Polarizer Multi-Coated Glass Filter

I will admit though, that is a lot of money, however, I should be able to use the same filters on the 14 mm lens I have now, as well as the 20 mm lens (once I get it...)

And as far as I understand, basically...

The UV Haze Filters are clear and simply block UV light (which may be unneeded for digital cameras?) as well as remove reflections.

A ND filter will slow movements down (such as waterfalls) and depending on the density level will also reduce light coming in, which I assume means it makes it better to use in the middle of the day when it is real bright. However, it seems like a ND filter also is made to bring more focus on a certain object?

The CP lenses basically reduce reflections and bring colors alive.

Maybe my perspective on each filter is a bit off, but even so, I guess each of these filters really are made for one individual reason (obviously, otherwise there wouldn't be so many...) With this in mind, how about stacking lenses?

And what about a hood? Do you think that these are a necessary part to have?


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 8:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(STICK @ Mar. 03 2013, 8:16 pm)
QUOTE
B+W 46mm Kaeseman Circular Polarizer Multi-Coated Glass Filter
...

Maybe my perspective on each filter is a bit off, but even so, I guess each of these filters really are made for one individual reason (obviously, otherwise there wouldn't be so many...) With this in mind, how about stacking lenses?

And what about a hood? Do you think that these are a necessary part to have?

That's the one I went for, although it's not the same size.

If you put it next to a cheap filter, you can really see the difference the coating makes.  (I do some stuff with precision optics, so I love to see a product that's so well made).

I would hesitate to stack filters, and with that one I wouldn't feel the need to add any other filtering anyway.  There a couple reasons.  First, internal reflections and distortions multiply when you stack filters.  Second, that's a fairly thick element, and you're likely to get vignetting with multiple filters, especially at wide angle.

There are times when a hood is useful, but I don't use one.

I should say, there are many folks here who are better versed than I am, and who are much better photographers, so stay tuned for more responses.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 9:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks again, Big Load.

I have to wait until the end of the month before I will be able to pick up any of the filters anyway (along with an extra battery, a 32 GB SD card and some other things) so I should have plenty of time to mull it over...

Sounds like if I go the CP route though, I will stick with the one listed. That is good to hear others direct feedback with an actual item...thanks.

As far as the outcome though, does the CP filter also help get those silky smooth water shots? Or is that all in another type of technique? It seems like this is what a lot of people emphasize with the ND filters.

As far as stacking, I noticed that others also mention the same things... and it makes sense.

Thanks again, I appreciate it.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 9:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Stick, I day hike and shoot a lot of photo's with my Canon 7D DSLR....thousands of photo's a year.  For filters, DONT purchase  UV filter --- they are a complete waste of money. The only thing they do is protect the lens glass element against scratches if you bump your glass element-- fact. Simple pay attention and dont bump your len :) As well they degrade the image - fact.  You cannot place cheap glass on the end of high end optics and expect great results.  I shoot many waterfalls and use a B+W Circular polarizer MRC filter...it'll do the same as a Neutral density filter by making that silky water look...with the added benefit ---you can see INTO the shallow stream beds with the polarization.  Yes they also highlight the blues and greens too.  To use a CP filter you focus your shot, turn the adjustable ring for the look your after - blue / green or polarization into water, check focus again, then click. Most CP filters are a 2 stop filter...meaning they slow the shutter down.  Thats how the silky images are created.  My lenses are heavy, a Canon 28-300 that weighs 3.7#, and 10-22 ( fairly light ) for wide angles, and my 7D DSLR 1.8#.   Now for the important part.  To capture those silky water fall or stream shots you'll need a tri-pod because your slowing the shutter down.  You WONT be able to hand hold the camera without blurring the image -fact. I have a Benro travel angle A 169 thats perfect for hiking as it folds small, yet super stable.   Try these settings -- set your camera to ISO 100, "AV" mode,  Aperture f/18 to f/22 and you should have something like this.....

See the rocks in this stream bed??...if I had a ND filter I wouldnt of seen these in my capture.  If you wear polarizing sunglasses you know what I mean.  A great CP filter is a must for water silky shots






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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 9:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ohhh, as for the hood.....  They only help for lens flare, not much of anything else.  I may use a hood on my 10-22 lens because it does have lens flare in some images if I dont.  In short, lens flare is a streak of light on the edge of an image.  With my 28-300, or 70-200, rarely if ever do I use a hood.....they weight to much as is, lol.  

The other to do is down load and add on to your browser that will read "exif data" right click on photos that you see posted and see what the settings are.  I dont block my exif data...some camera peeps are nuts and block these like they have some secrete way of capturing an image.  Some photo hosting web sites block them too.  I just checked the posted photos of mine....the first one is this

Camera Maker: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS 7D
Lens: 10.0 - 22.0 mm
Image Date: 2012-10-24 15:07:47 (no TZ)
Focal Length: 22mm
Aperture: f/20.0
Exposure Time: 5.000 s
ISO equiv: 100
Exposure Bias: none
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: aperture priority (semi-auto)
Exposure Mode: Auto Bracketing
White Balance: Auto
Flash Fired: No (enforced)
Orientation: Normal
Color Space: sRGB
GPS Coordinate: undefined, undefined
Software: easyHDR BASIC 2.13.3


no exif data for second

third photo
Camera Maker: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS 7D
Lens: 10.0 - 22.0 mm
Image Date: 2012-10-24 12:17:23 (no TZ)
Focal Length: 10mm
Aperture: f/22.0
Exposure Time: 3.200 s
ISO equiv: 100
Exposure Bias: none
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: aperture priority (semi-auto)
Exposure Mode: Auto Bracketing
White Balance: Auto
Flash Fired: No (enforced)
Orientation: Normal
Color Space: sRGB
GPS Coordinate: undefined, undefined
Software: Microsoft Windows Photo Viewer 6.1.7600.16385


no exif for 4th ---top secrete, lol  actually probably the way I posted it to my Photobucket account, meaning wrong...lol.

This isnt a good web site to post photos on...it shrinks the image a lot. If you were to see these on other sites that I frequesnt you would be amazed at the quality...(pat self on back til I choke, lol )
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 9:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

In terms of ND filters I like these:
http://www.mountainlight.com/filters.html

Those monster dynamic range shots we all run into out in the landscape can be tamed a bit with them.

I'm not certain a straight ND would do anything that can't be accomplished with a simple aperture adjustment in terms of water effects anyway. And it may be even a high dynamic range image can be dealt with with your camera's software. Look into whether it can shoot "HD" images.

ETA: As to a filter for simple lens protection? My litmus test for you would be whether you get your lens dirty enough often enough that repeated cleaning would threaten your scratching that expensive lens. That's a YMMV sort of thing as I see it.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 10:13 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Now that I have a decent DSLR I wouldn't be caught dead without my variable neutral density filter. 8 stops of adjustment just can't always be acceptably finagled with aperture size and exposure length. I use a Tiffen 2 to 8 that I got from ebay for less than $100.00.

Cheers!


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 10:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I spent a day with a pro photographer who gave me a few pointers.

for filters, he suggested I have a circular polarizing filter (already recommended) as well as graduated neutral density filters.  He showed me how to use the GND filters to get good sunset photos.

Anaehoomalu Bay


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 11:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(STICK @ Mar. 03 2013, 8:06 pm)
QUOTE
Thanks again, Big Load.

I have to wait until the end of the month before I will be able to pick up any of the filters anyway (along with an extra battery, a 32 GB SD card and some other things) so I should have plenty of time to mull it over...

Sounds like if I go the CP route though, I will stick with the one listed. That is good to hear others direct feedback with an actual item...thanks.

As far as the outcome though, does the CP filter also help get those silky smooth water shots? Or is that all in another type of technique? It seems like this is what a lot of people emphasize with the ND filters.

As far as stacking, I noticed that others also mention the same things... and it makes sense.

Thanks again, I appreciate it.

Yea, skip the UV filter unless you'll be in some really dusty places, it will provide some protection.

And an FYI, since you're shooting a micro 4/3 (welcome to the club! I have the G3) you can use a linear polarizer instead of a circular. They're about half the price of the circular. B+W are great filters.

Got any questions about the system, feel free to ask. I've used m4/3 since it was introduced. Love it, great system for the trail.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 04 2013, 10:13 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Here's my listing of filters for landscape photography:

1- Polarizer: Used to remove glare and reflections, which results in more vibrant colors and a 'cleaner' look. There effect is lessened when shooting directly into or away from the sun. I always have mine on (even though it cuts about 1.5-2 stops of light). A couple of example shots:


Vibrant blue sky


'Clean' water treatment, without reflections

2- Graduated Neutral Density Filter: Extremely useful in balancing lighting conditions when you have a bright sky and a dark background. Another essential filter, though tricky to use. I'd suggest a 3-stop difference between the bright and dark areas of the filter, if you're going to buy only one of these. Here's an example shot, with said filter:



3- Neutral Density Filter: This one is limited in applicability and is used to cut light. I only use this for waterfall/stream shots when it's too bright, or if I want to use an ultra long exposure. You might not want to try such shots, so I wouldn't recommend this as a must have. Here's an example shot:


30sec exposure and swirling leaves

As far as hoods go, I only use mine (sometimes) on my telephotos, not the wideangle. You can always use your hand to shade the lens...


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 04 2013, 6:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I do the same as GaliWalker.  The pure ND is very rarely used.  A CP can act in a similar fashion.

GNDs are tricky.  Hard or soft?  2, 3, 6 stops?  For a straight horizon like a seascape a hard 3 usually works.  If trees or mountains stick up a soft may (MAY) be more useful.  I've been known to combine GNDs, which is probably what I did in the second shot.

GNDs help you move the dynamic range of the real world closer to something your film/sensor can handle.  If you do more work when you get home you can apply additional techniques to achieve the effect you want.  All of this takes time, a relatively fixed amount of money, knowledge, and skill.  How much you're willing to invest is up to you.

Mississippi sunset.  Probably a 3 stop hard GND.  I was willing to let the foreground go black.  I really need to go back and rework this image.



A searing dawn near Ram Head, Saint John, USVI.  Probably a 2 and 3 stop hard GND combo.  Again, I was willing to let the foreground go black (I didn't have much choice in this one).

Being a bit of a minimalist, a certain amount of empty or featureless space doesn't bother me.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2013, 8:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

This is some good reading. I was told by an avid photographer to get a filter for the lens protection. Sounds like that is really not as important. It is mentioned if you are in areas that ruin the lens to use one. How about a baseball field on a windy day. Seems like the kids try harder to kick up more dust. Would that be a time to have a filter for protection?

I am still reading the included advice. Thanks Stick for asking. Also love your videos.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2013, 8:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

protection filter (UV)
like any insurance is only worth anything if something goes wrong.
for the ones that wear glasses, do you ever scratch your lenses ?
If you do , you might just end up scratching the one on your camera too.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 10 2013, 8:32 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks everyone for the help. I didn't mean to leave it be for so long... just been busy...

Anyway, I am looking at the B+W 46mm Kaesemann Linear Polarizer MRC Filter since it seems that the micro 4/3 camera doesn't require the circular polarizer. This is cool since it is about $25 less expensive! :)

Anyway, I just got back from a trip and was really hoping the camera would be here waiting on me, however, it seems that the company (J&R Music and Computer World- Via Amazon) I ordered from is not real good about actually sticking to their policy of "shipping within two days of receiving order"... Tomorrow it will have been 11 days, or the 7th business day... Not only that, it looks like the shipping speed won't match the amount of money I paid... I am not too happy with the transaction so far, and if it does not ship tomorrow I will likely cancel the order...

Anyway, thanks again everyone for the help!


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 10 2013, 8:38 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Try B&H if that one falls through. I bought some things rather recently and had a good experience: Christmas price cut ($200) and added goodies (spare battery and a radio remote shutter release) after I'd ordered and they refunded the difference and free shipped the goodies all with zero hassle.

But contact J&R directly, they don't know what thy don't know.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 10 2013, 8:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(High_Sierra_Fan @ Mar. 10 2013, 8:38 pm)
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Try B&H if that one falls through.

I really like B&H.   I also like to visit their store, but my city visits usually fall on Saturdays, so it doesn't happen too often.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 10 2013, 8:55 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

B&H is good.  I have had good luck with Adorama, too.  Keep in mind B&H is run by Jewish folks who close the shop for Jewish holidays so order times will take longer to process if you place them during or immediately before a big holiday.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 10 2013, 9:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

HSF, I did contact J&R last Thursday afternoon. I checked the order status that morning and it hadn't moved. Based on the fact that they state that items ship within 2 days of order, I expected it to be shipped out by last Tuesday since I ordered it the Friday before. This raised a flag so I just called them since I was going to be out hiking until today. She told me on the phone that it would ship that day (Thursday) before we got off the phone. Then, she called me back and left a message that said it wouldn't ship until Monday... not sure why... So, I will be calling them in the morning regardless. I did get a deal on the camera ($360) so I am hoping that they actually ship it rather than have to cancel the order and then reorder. The cheapest I see is $399 + shipping right now...

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 10 2013, 9:53 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well stuff does get back ordered despite vendor policies. They can't control manufacturer issues.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 10 2013, 10:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I understand that and would be fine with it. But it also states that "You will receive notification of any delay or cancellation of your order." Had they notified me I would have been a little more relaxed about it, after all, I gave them 4 business days (5 if you count the day I ordered it) to contact me before contacting them. And strange thing is, she couldn't give me much info on the phone, she just kept telling me that the order is in the warehouse and she couldn't really tell me anything else. I am still not sure why she called back and told me it wouldn't ship until Monday, after telling me it would ship that day...

I am not bashing on them (at this point), but considering my excitement of getting it, the amount of $$ involved, and with the way the process has gone now, I am a little nervous. I just want to see a shipping notification now... Which I think is reasonable...


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 16 2013, 6:59 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Great info guys!

I've been wanting to get the kaeseman CPL too but the price has crept back up recently, I've been watching. I had a few filters for my old point-n-shoot, a CPL (hoya HMC), UV (canon uv-1 i think it was), 6pt star, and they worked well. The UV was just for protection, and was just a cheap single coated one (I heard the single coated ones are much easier to clean) and on an 8MP digicam there was no degredation except for some flares in some bright sun shots. It served its purpose well too, it was destroyed in an accident (well two of them actually).

For my new dSLR my good lenses are bigger than the 58mm my point-n-shoot took so I'm looking for some new ones. I'm not too worried about UV for protection any more, as I am careful, and usually have a hood or cap on to help protect too.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 18 2013, 12:12 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Quick update, I finally got the camera in... finally....

Anyway, I have been reading up on the whole ISO/Aperture/Shutter Speed triangle...

I plan to order the B+W 46mm Kaesemann Linear Polarizer MRC Filter in the next week or so and will take that from there.

I also plan to order the 20mm f/1.7 lens sometime later too...


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 18 2013, 12:39 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

+1  circular polarizer filter
+1  UV Filter

But first thing is first.  Learn and understand exposure..
A polarizer will stop down your lens by two stops.. ND .6 filter will do the same thing.. But the Polarizer will kill unwanted reflections and darken your sky..  

Like anything in photography the camera is a tool.  Filters are another tool that you can use to get different effects.  I'm just getting into backpacking.  But I work with cameras for a living.

UV filter debate is a lot of fluff in terms of "Image quality".  The average joe can't tell and does not care for the most part. I will say my polarize saved my 17-40mm f/4 L EF lens last year when I dropped the lens out of my bag.  $50 filter saved my $800 lens.  (broke the filter, lens was untouched)

I can take a better photo with my Minolta X-370 35mm camera than a clueless joe using a Canon 5d mark iii camera any day of the week.

The focus should not be on the specs of the gear..  The focus should be knowing your gear and how to use it..  Don't get loss in the quest for the "best"..


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 20 2013, 10:52 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ok, so with the linear polarizer, would I need to focus the camera on my shot, and then add the linear polarizer to the lens? I can't really find a straight answer on this... As far as I understand a camera can still autofocus with a circular polarizer attached, but a linear polarizer will not allow this. Is this not the case for a micro4/3 camera?

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 20 2013, 11:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(STICK @ Mar. 20 2013, 7:52 pm)
QUOTE
Ok, so with the linear polarizer, would I need to focus the camera on my shot, and then add the linear polarizer to the lens? I can't really find a straight answer on this... As far as I understand a camera can still autofocus with a circular polarizer attached, but a linear polarizer will not allow this. Is this not the case for a micro4/3 camera?

Iirc depends on the camera: check the manual for the recommendation.

Well, fwiw the accessory polarizing filter they list is a circular one. Page 49
http://service.us.panasonic.com/OPERMANPDF/DMCGF2.PDF
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 20 2013, 11:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A polarizing filter does not affect the focusing (auto or manual)  system but the wrong type can affect the exposure.
AF equipped  SLRs (digital and non..) have a split mirror.
Part of the light is reflected to the viewfinder, the rest goes through the mirror and onto the AF  and exposure sensors .
Because of the way the light is transmitted you need a Circular Polarizer to get the correct exposure.
Nothing to do with AF nor with the way the image is polarized, both filters give the same result.
(so a "mirrorless" camera can use a linear polarizer)

A PL filter will cut , by rotating it, from one to three* stops (usually 2 when fully polarized) so in a sense it can work as a variable ND 2 to ND 8 filter
(ND 2 : 1/2 the light , ND 4 :1/4 ....) As you go up and down the F Stops you double or halve the light.

BTW, a 0.6 ND is the type sold as ND4

Just in case...
In low light cameras with a passive AF (not infrared/sound/flash assisted) system will have trouble focusing
A PL filter reduces the light by 1/2 or more so it will in very low light affect the focus however you are not likely to use a PL in low light.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 21 2013, 2:17 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Don't sweat the details, just go out and shoot. Try everything, and pay attention to what you did. Review your photos at the end of the day, and in a few weeks you can know so much that you could teach a class. That is the beauty of digital, the learning curve is not so steep because you don't have to wait to see the results. Take that camera everywhere and try to wear it out. Have fun!

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"Travel suggestions from strangers are like dancing lessons from God." -Kurt Vonnegut Jr.
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