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Topic: For the deer hunters....., post season report< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 12:09 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I never heard as many shots as I did this past season.  Starting with early muzzleloading through late muzzleloader, constant shooting.  I went from seeing lots of young bucks to none.  I've had my camera out the last 3 months and just pulled the card ...I'm glad to see a few of the younger bucks made it after all.  Also got pics of a couple mature bucks and a 2 year old, that will all be shooters next year.  I took 6 does and a 2 year old 8 point of my place this year.  The buck and 2 does with bow, a doe with muzzleloader, and 3 does with rifle.  A buddy shot his first 2....a buttonhead and 4 pt.

This one I have lots of pics over the last couple years, but none since September.  I thought for sure he somebody got him so I was very happy to get these post season pics.  Deformed rack I guess from an injury, been like that a couple years.


Nothing special here but he's definately mature.


Should be a shooter next year:


Here's some plots I've started, to improve the food sources a little:

along the water


top of the hill


along a bottom that borders some thicket




Last season fizzled into a heartache when I found the buck I'd been hunting the last 4  years up at the deer cooler with somebody else's tag on it:



Had a trail cam pic of him just a couple weeks earlier under one of my stands.



I had missed him with my bow in '09, he was huge then, came in fast and I put the 25 yard pin on him, turns out he was still at 35 yards so the arrow went clean under. He came in quick and would have given a 10 yard shot if I had not got excited.  Then in 2010 I missed an offhand shot with the muzzleloader.  He still didn't go noctornal, saw him all summer in '11, and found his shed that year.  He was actually bigger than when he died.

Anyway, he was shot on the property backside of ours.  The jawbone had a lot of wear with the molars cupped out. Old buck.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 6:43 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I hunt/kill deer too but 7 in one year outside of subsistence hunting is a bit excessive.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 8:19 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

based on what?  They want you to shoot every doe possible where I live because the deer population exceeds 50/mile, which causes habitat destruction and impacts the health of the herd.  I shoot 90% does. I ate 5 and gave 2 away.  I eat up to seven and shoot up to 10.  If I'd known I would only get 7, I might not have given any away.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 8:43 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You might want to consider learning how to take field photos... nothing worse than a beautiful buck reduced by the pictures of him. You obviously take a lot of pains over other aspects of your deer hunting... learning to take good photos (not the back of the truck variety) would be a real plus.

Just a thought.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 8:50 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(pass-thru @ Apr. 02 2013, 6:19 am)
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based on what?  They want you to shoot every doe possible where I live because the deer population exceeds 50/mile, which causes habitat destruction and impacts the health of the herd.  I shoot 90% does. I ate 5 and gave 2 away.  I eat up to seven and shoot up to 10.  If I'd known I would only get 7, I might not have given any away.

Don't let MLWoof get ya down... he has opinions about all sorts of things he knows absolutely nothing about.

Totally understand the need to reduce deer numbers in many Eastern/Southern states. Taking does is THE way to do it.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 8:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Perhaps you could tell us which of the threatened forbs in your area are recovering as a result of your hunting?

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 8:59 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(BradMT @ Apr. 02 2013, 8:43 am)
QUOTE
You might want to consider learning how to take field photos... nothing worse than a beautiful buck reduced by the pictures of him. You obviously take a lot of pains over other aspects of your deer hunting... learning to take good photos (not the back of the truck variety) would be a real plus.

Just a thought.

I don't think they wanted me to drag that fellas buck away from the cooler.  Also didn't want to make it look to much like I was the one that shot him.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 9:02 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Ecocentric @ Apr. 02 2013, 6:53 am)
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Perhaps you could tell us which of the threatened forbs in your area are recovering as a result of your hunting?

What about too many deer (ultimately) for too little forage without hunting (Eastern USA)?

How about increased auto/deer deaths and property/crop damage?

Hunting is a win/win for deer populations in the Midwest/East.

FWIW, there are more deer in the Eastern USA than when Columbus landed here... just a thought.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 9:03 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(pass-thru @ Apr. 02 2013, 6:59 am)
QUOTE

(BradMT @ Apr. 02 2013, 8:43 am)
QUOTE
You might want to consider learning how to take field photos... nothing worse than a beautiful buck reduced by the pictures of him. You obviously take a lot of pains over other aspects of your deer hunting... learning to take good photos (not the back of the truck variety) would be a real plus.

Just a thought.

I don't think they wanted me to drag that fellas buck away from the cooler.  Also didn't want to make it look to much like I was the one that shot him.

Gotchya, sorry... somehow missed the part you didn't take him.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 9:06 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Ecocentric @ Apr. 02 2013, 8:53 am)
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Perhaps you could tell us which of the threatened forbs in your area are recovering as a result of your hunting?

On my property I keep a good bit of the canopy open thrugh selective timbering.  That's why you see so many saplings in the plot pics.  With agressive harvest of deer, and proper habitat management, I don't have too much problem.

Habitat management includes killing non-favored (by the deer) invasives.  Deer will select favored vegetation and over browse.  So non-favored species like privet and asiatic bittersweet then become rampant.

On properties with less open canopy and no habitat management, maple, oak, poplar saplings are over browsed and privet and asiatic bittersweet, etc take over.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 10:00 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(BradMT @ Apr. 02 2013, 9:02 am)
QUOTE

(Ecocentric @ Apr. 02 2013, 6:53 am)
QUOTE
Perhaps you could tell us which of the threatened forbs in your area are recovering as a result of your hunting?

What about too many deer (ultimately) for too little forage without hunting (Eastern USA)?

How about increased auto/deer deaths and property/crop damage?

Hunting is a win/win for deer populations in the Midwest/East.

FWIW, there are more deer in the Eastern USA than when Columbus landed here... just a thought.

You clearly missed the meaning of the question.

Pass thru may have missed some ecological nuance, since he didn't exactly answer my question, but obviously understands his species specific management in terms of woody plants.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 10:10 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

As a deer hunter, I avoid the whole "well, there's no natural predators, and the deer population is too high" approach for rationalization of my activities.

White people with guns are the primary reason the ecosystem is out of kilter. The other top predators are gone by our hand. I try not to justify my hunting with previous policy errors.

Reintroduction, increased tolerance and decreased persecution of natural predators could assume a larger role in our "careful management" of wildlife populations.

I have to think that many users of this forum aren't very interested in the deer hunting photos. It's often hard for "nature lovers" to reconcile deer hunting with other modes of enjoying the outdoors.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 10:36 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(waterdog @ Apr. 02 2013, 10:10 am)
QUOTE
As a deer hunter, I avoid the whole "well, there's no natural predators, and the deer population is too high" approach for rationalization of my activities.

White people with guns are the primary reason the ecosystem is out of kilter. The other top predators are gone by our hand. I try not to justify my hunting with previous policy errors.

Reintroduction, increased tolerance and decreased persecution of natural predators could assume a larger role in our "careful management" of wildlife populations.

I have to think that many users of this forum aren't very interested in the deer hunting photos. It's often hard for "nature lovers" to reconcile deer hunting with other modes of enjoying the outdoors.

I realiz that, which why I put "for the deer hunters" just nobody would open the thread by mistake.

If you want to put the blame anywhere for high deer numbers, you should probably blame suburban sprawl and agriculture.  Those are the entities creating the habitat where deer thrive.  To the extent that white men with guns killed off predators, they also killed of the deer.

But please take careful note, I didn't blame anybody for anything.  I just stated a fact:  the deer density in my area exceeds 50/square mile, and they need killing.  They can be hunted and put to good use, or wholesale slaughtered by farmers with damage permits, then pushed into the landfill.  Any 1000 acre farm around here, and there are many, will kill about 50 deer/year with permits.  That's based on my conversations with farmers.

If the deer numbers were low, the harvest would be restricted.  That's not the case.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 10:41 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Ecocentric @ Apr. 02 2013, 10:00 am)
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Pass thru may have missed some ecological nuance, since he didn't exactly answer my question, but obviously understands his species specific management in terms of woody plants.

Well then please rephrase your question so the obtuse among us can understand the ecological nuance and I can answer your question.  

Or is the purpose a penumbra that has no answer?
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 10:49 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It is all part of the outdoor experience. I am pro-hunting, exactly because management is needed in the absence of apex predators. I also believe that public lands are a commons, owned by all, to be managed for the benefit of all users. Management priorities should be ecosystem wide, not solely to benefit a single species. Hunters that better articulate the benefits of their sport to the interests of bird watchers and wildflower lovers will foster more acceptance for hunting.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 11:32 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Around Argonne National Lab the Forest Preserve District has been attempting to restore the Oak Savannah eco system. Some areas the buckthorn and honeysuckle are so thick you can't push through even in the winter.

They will fence off real small sections (10X10, maybe even a little smaller) in the study areas that have been cleared of invasives and burned in order to determine the impact of the deer foraging on the regrowth. They also quietly bring in hunters every fall to cull the deer overpopulation in the 1500 acres of woods.  

It is a pretty cool area to hike around in considering the proximity to Chicago and all. I'm not sure the Oak Savanna they are trying to recreate will ever be self sustaining though.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 11:47 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I wish our deer here needed killing. In just a few decades, our deer herds in NorCal have become mere phantoms of their previous splendor. Mountain lions prevail, though.

CA Fish and Game--oh, sorry, they just changed their name to the more PC Fish and Wildlife--has created a system of hundreds of zones and seasons (if you made a Punnett square matrix of the options). This has resulted in a very user-unfriendly system.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 9:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It seems this thread started as a "post season report" and migrated into a defense of hunting.
First of all, congrats to pass-thru for a fine season last year, for effective land management and some nice looking food plots.
I too love to hike and backpack but am also passionate about hunting, particularly bowhunting whitetails.  I harvested seven with my bow in a major metropolitan area.  There is no other effective management of suburban deer other than car bumpers. Every deer I take is one that won't get hit by a car. I eat them and give many away to needy families.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 9:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That's great GoWest, I don't know where you live, but what is your opinion about apex predators, songbirds, or wild flowers. Are you anything more than a hunter? -Just askin'? Really, I'm just looking for a discussion that goes into some "deep ecology."

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 10:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ecocentric, I live in GA, and do many other things than just hunt and hike.  I'm not sure what you're asking,  but there are not any apex predators in my area other than humans and coyotes.

All of nature is intertwined and relate to each other.  While I'm not an avid birdwatcher or study wildflowers, I know that all of nature and the ecology is better off when it is balanced.  Maintaining a deer population within the carrying capacity of the land is essential to not only the deer herd itself, but it also benefits the forage and other dependent species.

Again, Pass-thru was giving a post season report, not a request for a deep discussion on ecology.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 11:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

QUOTE
he has opinions about all sorts of things he knows absolutely nothing about.

Growing up hunting in SW VA and having lived in NC, PA,MD, NY, NJ and OH and hiked, backpacked and hunted in all of those and more, I can't possibly know anything about eastern wilderness.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 02 2013, 11:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

QUOTE
where I live

The "where" being left out of your OP and followups.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 03 2013, 12:44 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Being a hunter, and a backpacker, I've combined the activities. I respect and grow from both pursuits, and particularly when they overlap in time and space.

But this is ostensibly a backpacking forum, and it seems like a bit of an odd venue to post pictures of backyard hunting. Let's see pictures of your backpack-in hunts, in the back of beyond, rather than harvest photos from a well-managed eastern farm or wood plot.

There must be wildlife mgmt forums to discuss food plots, and archery forums to discuss bow hunting, and god knows there are shooting forums to discuss rifle hunting.

But I've never felt a need to look at those websites. I consider hunting a private affair, mainly between me and the quarry, shared at most with one good friend and our dogs.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 03 2013, 8:41 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Trail head register is not unlike campfire talk. Pretty much anything family friendly and non political is OK.

While I don't hunt my buddy who introduced me to backpacking is a hunter.

He also happens to be a good cook, when he calls and says venison backstrap I'm generally over there before the phone disconnects, lol.

I think he took five does this last season.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 08 2013, 10:26 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm jealous. On a whim, early this past fall, I bought my first bow. I practiced daily the next couple of weeks and felt confident at 30 yards. I hunted with my friend 3x during the season. Although trail cams showed a lot of activity, I never saw anything while in the blind or stand. One day I got restless and decided to stalk. I flushed a doe from a bed in a field and followed her into the woods. I got around 25 yards away, but she moved a bit and her vitals were behind a tree. I moved laterally to get a shot, and 3 yards away from my shooting lane... SNAP... I stepped on a stick and it was all over. That was as close as I got to taking a shot all season.

Over the winter, I constructed a target shooting area in my back yard. Now that the weather is improving, I hope to practice consistently during the next 6 months. And I'll also have to ask local landowners/farmers for permission to hunt this coming season. It'd be nice just to go out for a couple hours after work or on weekends rather than coordinating visits to my friend's camp.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 10 2013, 10:49 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Black flies... Hopefully you'll have better luck next season. It's still impressive being able to stalk a deer into bow range - especially after jumping the deer. Even in thick woods I've never got that close to a deer after spooking one.

As for the original topic, I got 3 doe this past season. 3 is as many as I have ever got in a year personally, and if one or two of them were big deer it would take care of most of my meat for the year. The ones I just got we're all pretty small though. I don't have the luxury of picking out a big buck and watching him for a few years, that's not really my style anyhow. If I'm bow hunting and out in the woods a few times a week for the season I usually see enough deer I'll let the little ones go, but this year I didn't get to go out during bow season at all. And I didn't hardly see anything during the gun week so I was lucky I got one on the bonus weekend since I wasn't going to be able to have time off for the 4 day muzzleloader season. Turns out I took a new job and got the weekend off during muzzleloader, and that's when I got the other two.

Actually brought in some of my canned soup I made to work today... Venison and garden vegetable made almost entirely off the land - I even make my own venison stock. I really enjoy being able to live mostly off my own (and the families) land. I cut firewood to heat my house as well, all in trying to live a more sustainable and natural life.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 10 2013, 11:12 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Deer in my area are pretty small given the over population. Unfortunately the public hunting grounds are so few and far between that I gave up hunting (bow and shotgun) because there were more hunters than deer in those areas.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 10 2013, 11:40 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(pass-thru @ Apr. 02 2013, 12:09 am)
QUOTE
I never heard as many shots as I did this past season.  Starting with early muzzleloading through late muzzleloader, constant shooting.  I went from seeing lots of young bucks to none.  I've had my camera out the last 3 months and just pulled the card ...I'm glad to see a few of the younger bucks made it after all.  Also got pics of a couple mature bucks and a 2 year old, that will all be shooters next year.  I took 6 does and a 2 year old 8 point of my place this year.  The buck and 2 does with bow, a doe with muzzleloader, and 3 does with rifle.  A buddy shot his first 2....a buttonhead and 4 pt.

This one I have lots of pics over the last couple years, but none since September.  I thought for sure he somebody got him so I was very happy to get these post season pics.  Deformed rack I guess from an injury, been like that a couple years.


Nothing special here but he's definately mature.


Should be a shooter next year:


Here's some plots I've started, to improve the food sources a little:

along the water


top of the hill


along a bottom that borders some thicket




Last season fizzled into a heartache when I found the buck I'd been hunting the last 4  years up at the deer cooler with somebody else's tag on it:



Had a trail cam pic of him just a couple weeks earlier under one of my stands.



I had missed him with my bow in '09, he was huge then, came in fast and I put the 25 yard pin on him, turns out he was still at 35 yards so the arrow went clean under. He came in quick and would have given a 10 yard shot if I had not got excited.  Then in 2010 I missed an offhand shot with the muzzleloader.  He still didn't go noctornal, saw him all summer in '11, and found his shed that year.  He was actually bigger than when he died.

Anyway, he was shot on the property backside of ours.  The jawbone had a lot of wear with the molars cupped out. Old buck.

Super post Pass-thru and excellent pictures!

I'm like you and get all the dear I want and live on it year round and so does my cat! Although no longer hunting after giving it up after 47 years due to health reasons, I do have an ace up my sleeve. I have a close friend who is a care taker on 50,000 acres of apple orchard in Columbia County New York that gets 300 or more nuisance permits a year from NYS ENCON to cull the deer herd. I can ask for a fat "big Edna" doe, a "this years model veal" variety or a 225# dressed big buck if I want.

Keep up the the great hunt reports and keep the pictures coming!


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 22 2013, 10:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Here's the update on the plots.  Learned a lot about trying to grow clover....namely kill of the existing vegetation before turning the soil.  Spent a lot of time and money trying to salvage these plots this summer after competing vegetation took them over before they ever got started.  

Along the water, this one struggles the most:
[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums....MG]

top of the hill, lots of lespedeza competing
[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums....MG]

these are of a bottom plot that's doing really good

[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums....MG]
[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums....MG]
[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums....MG]
[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums....MG]
[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums....MG]
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 22 2013, 10:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

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