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Topic: ...Early morning April 4 ..., ... shot rings out in the Memphis sky ..< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 11:17 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

45 years ago today, Martin Luther King was assassinated in Memphis.  Those were turbulent times.



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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 11:19 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Still are turbulent times.

However, I'd like to think we've come a long way in 45 years.  I hope, at least.

RIP.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 11:31 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I remember the day well, as a Junior in HS.  While I did no know her then, it was April's 17th birthday, and she mentioned how it had affected her.  

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 11:35 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Turbulent, indeed, but incredibly exciting.  Having grown up in the 60 & early 70s, I can't imagine a more dynamic and enlightening time to have matured.  My experiences from that era still influence my belief systems and life style.  I wouldn't have missed them for anything.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 11:44 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(ol-zeke @ Apr. 04 2013, 8:31 am)
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I remember the day well, as a Junior in HS.  While I did no know her then, it was April's 17th birthday, and she mentioned how it had affected her.  

In 1968 I was still just 15yo (would turn 16yo in October of that year).  I did not realize April and I were that close in age.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 11:47 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I second that Jer, every generation is unique for the time that it grew up in, but we have seen so much change, especially in terms of social justice, and environmental awareness.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 12:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hikerjer @ Apr. 04 2013, 8:35 am)
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Turbulent, indeed, but incredibly exciting.  Having grown up in the 60 & early 70s, I can't imagine a more dynamic and enlightening time to have matured.  My experiences from that era still influence my belief systems and life style.  I wouldn't have missed them for anything.

Yep I remember the summer of 67, the so called Summer of Love, Poor Peoples March, SDS, Weather Underground, Kent State, The 1968 Democrat Convention in Chicago, the Chicago Seven trial, Woodstock, Mr Natural, Altamont, JFK MLK and RFK assassinations, sit-ins, love-ins, Black Panthers, White Panthers, Civil Rights, the Vietnam conflict and all the protests surrounding that, sexual revolution, bra burning, draft card burning, Symbionese Liberatiion Army, and all the wonderful (and some not-so-wonderful) music from that era.  

Good times ... I think.  *bigsixtiesmemorylapsegrins*


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 12:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I grew up in the 80's and early 90's.  Vanilla Ice was all the rage when I was in 6th grade.

Yes, I feel a bit gipped. :p


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 12:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The 60s and early 70s were a mix of good and bad.  Obviously the assassinations of JFK, MLK, and RFK were of the bad.  I also have to throw the 1972 attemted assassination of George Wallace and all the beatings and killings related to civil rights, like Medgar Evars and the bombing of the Burmingham Church in 1963 which killed 4 little girls.  But there were good things which came about as well.  I think the biggest was just an awareness by young people that they could think for themselves and weren't locked in to what society told them they had to be.  There were excesses but that is the norm with stuff like this.  

In some ways we have retreated from the "gains" made back them.  In other ways the progress has continued. Earth Day and the ecological movement got us the Clean Air and Water Acts, which have vastly inproved the USA and world.  Mike, I think the ecological movement from back then is now again at a point of decision for society with the CO2 emissions, global warming, and such.  This is part of what you are up to studying and researching.  Do good work and maybe we will find good answers.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 12:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Ecocentric @ Apr. 04 2013, 11:47 am)
QUOTE
we have seen so much change, especially in terms of social justice, and environmental awareness.

+1.  It hasn't been all bad.  Like you, I think the overall result of those tumultuous years has been good.  But of course, we still have a long ways to go.  Keep up the good fight.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 9:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RumiDude @ Apr. 04 2013, 11:17 am)
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45 years ago today, Martin Luther King was assassinated in Memphis.  Those were turbulent times.

Rumi

Yes, I am a few months on either side of Rumi and I gave a speech this morning moments that shaped your life and I gave that at 15 on a June night 1968 when my father, an NRA organizer-magazine writer got the call from Washington to get to Sacremento tomorrow as the California Assembly was going to come unglued as Bobby Kennedy had been gunned down in LA.

Bless the old man because he really showed me that changes happened when people get involved. We live in a participatory democracy; it really matters who shows up and when. I would have to leave home at 17 because because I did radicalize quickly. Not long after he passed on in '87 I found journals that confirmed that he had me put on a federal watch list....yep it was interesting times.

I now work in public lands advocacy for wilderness as a community organizer, pretty tame stuff even for Wyoming. Yes we have made some incredible progess in social justice, but in areas like poverty and class, I feel we are back-sliding so far from the dream.

Yes I know, another watermelon, green on the outside, and red in the middle :) :)


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 9:20 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hikerjer @ Apr. 04 2013, 9:35 am)
QUOTE
Turbulent, indeed, but incredibly exciting.  Having grown up in the 60 & early 70s, I can't imagine a more dynamic and enlightening time to have matured.  My experiences from that era still influence my belief systems and life style.  I wouldn't have missed them for anything.



(RumiDude @ Apr. 04 2013, 10:04 am)
QUOTE

Yep I remember the summer of 67, the so called Summer of Love, Poor Peoples March, SDS, Weather Underground, Kent State, The 1968 Democrat Convention in Chicago, the Chicago Seven trial, Woodstock, Mr Natural, Altamont, JFK MLK and RFK assassinations, sit-ins, love-ins, Black Panthers, White Panthers, Civil Rights, the Vietnam conflict and all the protests surrounding that, sexual revolution, bra burning, draft card burning, Symbionese Liberatiion Army, and all the wonderful (and some not-so-wonderful) music from that era.  

Good times ... I think.  *bigsixtiesmemorylapsegrins*


+2 or is that 3 ?

There's still plenty of work to be done though; a release from the worldwide dependence on fossil fuels, continued evolution of Civil Rights, etc., etc..

Here's a few of my pics from "The Summer of '69"

JFK's grave. The sod on Bobby's hadn't even taken hold yet....




Sunset from the top of the Washington Monument, I ran the stairs  up and down.



And of course Arlington Cemetery, though they're probably running low on Real Estate there now.



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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 10:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The sixties were rather depressing for their assassinations, riots, and wars. It seems the anti-war movement spurred some of the younger generation to take action in other areas — sometimes wrong, sometimes right.

There are so many challenges facing us today regarding the environment and social justice. Yet progress seems so slow or co-opted by frivolity that misses the real purpose.

Forty years ago the growth of population and consumption seemed a real concern. Yet those who understand that concern today often think their own young generation discovered it. Or so it seems at times.

We need a new impetus to conservation — something with the determination of the anti-war movement — something that sees predators like wolves as important as the elk they feed on, something that does not see land wasted if not grazed down to the prescribed height of our lawns, something that sees the danger of domesticated sheep to wild and indigenous species, and something that sees the problem of allowing domestic herds to form policy on public lands.

Too often the title of "conservationist" has been co-opted and redefined by those who profit from only conserving what is important to them, the rest of nature be damned. Too often we treat the better movements toward conservation as outsiders and the locals of an area as the heros.

Recognizing a problem can be a first step toward a solution — even if we are all guilty of not caring enough, and not working hard enough toward that solution.

Those we have called the Founding Fathers admitted slavery was wrong. Jefferson and Madison knew it was wrong but kept their slaves. Washington felt it wrong also but only freed them at his death. They knew slavery was wrong, wrote about how wrong it was, but felt powerless in their time to do something about it.

Even Lincoln did not fight a war to free slaves. He fought to save a Union, and freeing slaves became a means to that end. And a century passed between the Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement of the sixties. Freedom was often a different type of slavery in that century.

Martin Luther King Jr. was a great voice of freedom. Perhaps we need more such voices today. I remember well the day that voice was silenced. And in the time since, it seems too many of the better voices have remained silent — to our detriment.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 10:52 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

++ great thoughts there.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 11:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The sixties?

Right here:

http://www.vvmf.org/thewall
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 11:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I remember this day in 1967 quite vividly.  It was not something abstract or distant.  It had profound impact on the community in which I lived, contributing to increasing frustration with injustice that culminated two months later in a major riot. Although I will never forget the sight of tanks rolling down the street just a block from my house, it didn't have the same impact as the look on my parents faces when Rev. King was killed.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 11:08 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Love what Travis wrote. Having been only 4 months old when JFK was assassinated and a first grader for the first moon landing and only seeing Vietnam as the noisy part of the news that Dad turned off if the kids came in the room, the 60s I lived through was so wrapped in a protective bubble of bike riding and roller skating and playing flag football in the city park across the street. By the time I heard of MLK Jr it was in history class watching a recording of the "I have a dream" speech. But still, he impacts kids today. There is a movie with whoopie Goldberg that is historical clips and animation. Sone kids go back in time and save their friend, Martin but when they bring him to the future it is now like the past, non of their non white friends can go to their school. The Pollution and segregation and hatred overwhelm them and Martin has to go back to die to set it all right. Kids you would sometimes think lack empathy are in tears during the movie.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 11:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TravisNWood @ Apr. 04 2013, 10:47 pm)
QUOTE
The sixties were rather depressing for their assassinations, riots, and wars. It seems the anti-war movement spurred some of the younger generation to take action in other areas — sometimes wrong, sometimes right.

There are so many challenges facing us today regarding the environment and social justice. Yet progress seems so slow or co-opted by frivolity that misses the real purpose.

Forty years ago the growth of population and consumption seemed a real concern. Yet those who understand that concern today often think their own young generation discovered it. Or so it seems at times.

We need a new impetus to conservation — something with the determination of the anti-war movement — something that sees predators like wolves as important as the elk they feed on, something that does not see land wasted if not grazed down to the prescribed height of our lawns, something that sees the danger of domesticated sheep to wild and indigenous species, and something that sees the problem of allowing domestic herds to form policy on public lands.

Too often the title of "conservationist" has been co-opted and redefined by those who profit from only conserving what is important to them, the rest of nature be damned. Too often we treat the better movements toward conservation as outsiders and the locals of an area as the heros.

Recognizing a problem can be a first step toward a solution — even if we are all guilty of not caring enough, and not working hard enough toward that solution.

Those we have called the Founding Fathers admitted slavery was wrong. Jefferson and Madison knew it was wrong but kept their slaves. Washington felt it wrong also but only freed them at his death. They knew slavery was wrong, wrote about how wrong it was, but felt powerless in their time to do something about it.

Even Lincoln did not fight a war to free slaves. He fought to save a Union, and freeing slaves became a means to that end. And a century passed between the Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement of the sixties. Freedom was often a different type of slavery in that century.

Martin Luther King Jr. was a great voice of freedom. Perhaps we need more such voices today. I remember well the day that voice was silenced. And in the time since, it seems too many of the better voices have remained silent — to our detriment.

Very well said and quite eloquent, Travis.  And this from a guy who lives in Wyoming and not even Jackson.  Guys like you and DC give me hope for the nation.  All we can do is keep up the good fight.


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