SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.


» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

Page 1 of 3123>>

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: What do you use GPS for in the wilderness< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
sixgun Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 298
Joined: May 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 12:20 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I am a bit of a GPS geek and thought I would ask people about their GPS use, to find out how most people use their GPS, the industry sells a lot of units what is everyone doing with them.
Which functions or features do you use on your GPS.
For instance
Waypoint for your parked car.
Trip computer.
Tracking.
Geocaching.

And do you upload your waypoints and or tracks to the internet so others can use them?
Or did you play with it a little then quit using it.

Please note I am not ask a how to question here.


--------------
The more you know the less you need.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 2
RumiDude Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 14410
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 12:28 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I don't use my GPS now, but when I did I mainly used it to mark waypoints.  One night on Mt Shasta with very heavy snow falling, i.e. whiteout conditions at night, the GPS allowed me to find my tent and thus save me from an uncomfortable night out on the mountain.

If I had the money, I would get a new GPS with all the bells and whistles.

Rumi


--------------
“This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all.”
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 3
big_load Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 24021
Joined: Jun. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 12:29 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I mark my car and I mark things that I think would be useful for future reference or interesting to research further (like water sources, campsites, trail junctions, ruins, petroglyph sites, etc.).  Sometimes I record tracks, but usually not.

I generally leave the GPS turned off, and power it up just to mark something or to read an altitude or position.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 4
ol-zeke Search for posts by this member.
Clear Creek
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 13064
Joined: Sep. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 12:29 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I mostly hike on trails, well mapped, well defined, trails.  I bought a GPS 7-8 years ago, and found it was about as useful to me as a baseball.  Actually, I would have had more fun carrying a baseball.  5 ounces of dead weight, as far as I was concerned.  I sold that GPS for about 1/2 price.

Fast forward to now.  I have taken up kayaking, on the Gulf Coast.  While I have good charts, there are times when I need to know for a fact just where I am.  Weight is not the concern while in the boat, so I bought a new unit with Blue Water maps.  I can paddle by chart until I am confused, then turn on the GPS and know exactly where I am.  Over a 8 day paddle, this can be really helpful.  


--------------
Everything I know, I learned by doing it wrong at least twice.

"I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth."  Steve McQueen
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 5
sixgun Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 298
Joined: May 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 12:45 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(big_load @ Apr. 05 2013, 12:29 am)
QUOTE
I mark my car and I mark things that I think would be useful for future reference or interesting to research further (like water sources, campsites, trail junctions, ruins, petroglyph sites, etc.).  Sometimes I record tracks, but usually not.

I generally leave the GPS turned off, and power it up just to mark something or to read an altitude or position.

This is mostly what I do, although on shorter hikes (when the batteries can last the whole hike) I will track the hike and use the trip computer to estimate how far I have gone and how far I have to go, provided I know the length of my hike when I start.

--------------
The more you know the less you need.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 6
sixgun Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 298
Joined: May 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 12:49 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(ol-zeke @ Apr. 05 2013, 12:29 am)
QUOTE
I mostly hike on trails, well mapped, well defined, trails.  I bought a GPS 7-8 years ago, and found it was about as useful to me as a baseball.  Actually, I would have had more fun carrying a baseball.  5 ounces of dead weight, as far as I was concerned.  I sold that GPS for about 1/2 price.

Fast forward to now.  I have taken up kayaking, on the Gulf Coast.  While I have good charts, there are times when I need to know for a fact just where I am.  Weight is not the concern while in the boat, so I bought a new unit with Blue Water maps.  I can paddle by chart until I am confused, then turn on the GPS and know exactly where I am.  Over a 8 day paddle, this can be really helpful.  

I do find a GPS more useful for paddling than hiking, but I think that will change as the gps units improve and more people share their hikes with others via the internet.

--------------
The more you know the less you need.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 7
sixgun Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 298
Joined: May 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 12:57 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have made it a goal to use my GPS more and share my tracks and waypoints with others via the internet.
I plan to post them on everytrail.com, it seems to be the site/app that gets the most use and would therefor allow me to help the most people find a good hike to try.
I also thought it would be great if I made waypoints of campsites, trailheads, water sources and the closet parking spots for backpacking trails


--------------
The more you know the less you need.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 8
SW Mtn backpacker Search for posts by this member.
Born to hike, forced to work ...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 7314
Joined: Jul. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 12:58 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Recreationally, for dedicated geocache finding but that's more about dayhikes.  Backpacking wise whenever there's potential for white-out or navigational error.  Otherwise it is deadweight which rarely accompanies me on multiday trips.

--------------
Usually Southwest and then some.

In wildness is the preservation of the world. - Henry Thoreau
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 9
swimswithtrout Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 8013
Joined: Jan. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 12:59 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What's a GPS ??

--------------
Want to see The Wind River Range in widescreen 1080p ?
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 10
sixgun Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 298
Joined: May 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 1:03 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(swimswithtrout @ Apr. 05 2013, 12:59 am)
QUOTE
What's a GPS ??

I think a lot of people buy them and then don't really use them, so I can't knock you reply.

--------------
The more you know the less you need.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 11
Reminiscence Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 4381
Joined: Sep. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 1:07 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I like my GPS. I will be using GPS for science in the backcountry in the future. I don't keep it on, but periodically check out location, particularly curious about my elevation in most instances. The car waypoint is nothing to be scoffed at, especially if you favor cross-country expanses.

--------------
"To be a friend of the Earth, you have to be an enemy of the people." -T.C. Boyle
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 12
llamapacker Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1023
Joined: Feb. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 1:37 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

When planning backpacking trips I use the GPS along with my mapping software to mark points of interest on optional routes.  For the chosen hike I reduce the list to significant waypoints such as off trail lakes and junctions.  During the hike I find and mark other locations of interest.  On scrambles with character I like to track myself and besides, I carried the darn thing I'm going to use it.  I print topo maps with the waypoints and navigate with those until I need the GPS.  Sometimes I put maps with tracks and waypoints  of completed hikes in picture albums.  I own an older Etrex Legend Cx.    

One of my projects this winter, while I was healing from shoulder surgery, was to clean up the multitude of waypoints I have on two computers and one GPS.  Maptech Terrain Navigator doesn't let me create individual folders so I decided to use numeric prefixes assigned by state and region to sort the tracks and waypoints.   Looked good on paper, but the only time I could sit still long enough to get anything done was after the hydrocodone took effect.  At times the process went very fast and at other times I found myself staring at pixels.  I haven't looked at the completed project since I've been off the meds.  I hope I didn't do something stupid like use different prefixes for each computer or delete hard earned waypoints.  
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 13
nogods Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 6393
Joined: Sep. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 7:06 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use it to record my tracks.  I then use ExpertGPS to import my photos and calibrate then with the gps track, then write up a trip report and guide for other hikers.

I have a 62s so I can put custom maps on it with my intended bushwhack, then monitor how closely my actual bushwhack is with the planned one.  I bought a Thielsen hands free harness for that purpose: http://www.wildlandwarehouse.com/wwcatal....274.cfm
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 14
mjeck Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 81
Joined: Mar. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 7:17 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

So far only for hunting locations, makes it much easier to find deer stands in the dark. But definitely for marking car locations, tent locations, and interesting and helpful waypoints.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 15
Montanalonewolf Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 7230
Joined: Mar. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 7:25 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I don't. I have no need of one. The GPS I do have is many years old and hasn't even been turned on in several months, maybe close to 2 years.

--------------
If you are free to be a Liberal- Thank a person with a gun.

Those who don't read have no advantage over those who can't.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 16
Tallgrass Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 201
Joined: May 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 8:04 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use the GPS essentials app on my phone. Use it a lot to track when I run. Have tracked some day hikes and especially track when doing plant survey work (like to see how far I do walk).

Also use it to mark way points for anything interesting and the car.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 17
toejam Search for posts by this member.
the high road is hard to find
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1764
Joined: Mar. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 8:40 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The guy that runs our volunteer organization keeps nagging me to get a gps for trail surveys. I send him pictures and verbal descriptions but he wants gps markers. I just really don't want to have to carry one and mess with it - I think a camera is a pita.

I assume someday I'll have a smart phone with a camera & gps so there is a waypoint for all my pictures. Not sure how I'll keep the battery charged.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 18
QCHIKER Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2391
Joined: Oct. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 8:55 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use it mostly on the trail just to see how far we've gone or when bushwacking for how to get back to a certain point. I use it a lot when paddling on rivers so I have some idea of where I'm at and I use it for marking campsites so I know when one is coming up.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 19
Lamebeaver Search for posts by this member.
trail? I don't need no stinkin trail!
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 19508
Joined: Aug. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 9:45 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I mark the car, and points I'd like to visit, like old gold mines.  I'ts quite handy for off-trail destinations.

I also do geocaching, but I generally don't mix this with hiking.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 20
Ecocentric Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5227
Joined: Jun. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 10:02 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I mark points where I would like to return to, especially for photographic purposes. Knowing what direction and how far the car or camp is can be great for cross country travel. As mentioned, shorelines are harder to reconcile with the chart from a boat, so I rely on it for location mostly when paddling, or when mountain weather socks in.

--------------
"Travel suggestions from strangers are like dancing lessons from God." -Kurt Vonnegut Jr.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 21
GoBlueHiker Search for posts by this member.
Obsessive Island Hopper...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 16552
Joined: Jul. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 10:18 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Usually, I don't bother.  Even off-trail.  I used to (with a bunch of waypoints pre-marked to help with navigation), but found I didn't need it and I prefer to travel without.  Just one less gadget to worry about and carry spare batteries for.  KISS.

For my science work, it's indispensable.  In a couple weeks we're flying to the Greenland ice sheet and spending 4 1/2 weeks traveling by snowmobile, drilling cores, setting instruments, collecting ground-penetrating radar, etc.  There isn't a visible land feature in hundreds of miles.



So, we're bringing several GPS's with waypoints pre-loaded, in addition to a couple $15K high-precision dGPS units to record our radar tracks to sub-centimeter accuracy.  Folks from the boards here have lent me a few handheld GPS's for this purpose, for which I'm grateful.

But for hiking and backpacking?  Meh.  Just my $.02 anyway.

- Mike


--------------
Wealth needs more.  Happiness needs less.  Simplify.

www.RainForestTreks.com
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 22
ashepabst Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1322
Joined: Jul. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 10:24 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

i keep in mine (garmin etrex hc) in reach on a trip... record the track and waypoints and i load it up with WPs beforehand if there's good data available (thank god for the Tennessee Landorms site and GPSFileDepot). i've never worn a watch so the GPS has always acted as my timepiece -- sunrise/sunset times always come in handy if i forget to check before i leave home. oh, and mine has games which is nice on solo trips... i'm forever forgetting to bring something to read on solo trips.

--------------
      /\    /\/\        / \       / \
 /\/   \ /      \  /\ /    \-^/    \^.   /\
/   \    \        \/  \       \ /       \ \ /  \ /\
     \     \       \    \       /          \/     /   \
                           \    /             \
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 23
Tigger Search for posts by this member.
Woods Pouncer
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12157
Joined: Apr. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 10:28 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use mine to help with navigation. I most often use one in conjunction with a map to determine the best route to reach a destination. It's main purpose for me is to determine where I am quickly. I use my paper maps more often than the built-in maps although when I am lazy, I'll just use the map in my GPS app. I don't put in waypoints except for the location of my vehicle. The coordinates of the places I am going are on my map already.

--------------
If I'm going to be lost, in the woods is where I want to be...
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 24
Roger Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2108
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 10:46 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Like ol-zeke and others I hike and backpack on known trails so do not use a GPS.  Occasionally I use my car GPS to find the trail head or the landing for put in my paddle craft.   When I am in the everglades and other coastal areas I carry my GPS with blue maps.  It has come in handy when the mangroves all look the same and there are numerous waterways.  I always have a compass and maps when paddling the glades or similar areas.  The GPS is a backup and not the primary tool to find my way.

--------------
“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” -Mark Twain
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 25
wycanislatrans Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2760
Joined: Nov. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 11:04 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use it rarely, sometimes to mark unique locations, but mostly it stays at home.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 26
Dave Senesac Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3481
Joined: Jun. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 11:44 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Bought an i-gotU GT-800 Pro about a month ago, a tiny GPS data logger/altimeter/compass for $79 that weighs less than 2 ounces.  Main interest was to record my path while skiing at resorts, though sometimes may also use it to record day hiking paths. In either case simply for some later amusement back on my computer at home.  

As a data logger does not have those usual Garmin type LCD screen map guiding functions.  As a map person, I am one that definitely does not need some electronic tool like that for guidance.  Instead one simply turns it on, chucks it away in a pack, and then hours later when done with whatever turns it off. Well unless one wants to record waypoints.   No reason to ever take it backpacking.  User guide was created by a non-English speaking sub-moron.  Brought it on my long Arizona road trip last week but kept forgeting to ever turn it on before hiking haha.  After work today am driving up to Oroville CA so I can ramble around atop the famous Table Mountain volcanic plateau as wildflowers be peaking.  Ought to turn it on and if so maybe will post a graphic of my path.

And recently bought a Samsumg Galaxy Tab II 7.0 inch tablet running Android 4.0 for road trips that also has a GPS positioning function either by satellite or wifi.   Google default was ON and immediately turned that OFF as seems like an invasion of privacy though might turn it back on occasionally on the road to locate commercial stuff.


--------------
...David

http://davidsenesac.com
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 27
waterdog Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 466
Joined: Sep. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 11:50 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The GPS is one of the things I want to carry even if I don't use it. I'd rather have it and not need it than vice versa.

I add waypoints for: the truck, hard to find water sources, trail jcts, stuff I want to avoid at 3 AM like open mine shafts where I turkey hunt, buck rubs and scrapes, duck blinds and deep holes, roost trees, and hook-up spots when I'm trolling with downriggers. I find it most useful for marine navigation/fishing, and for hunting, a lot which involves being on trail-less terrain before and after dark.

I don't often consult it while trail hiking. The one time I got in serious trouble on a trail, consumer GPS units were not yet available. Blizzard conditions, white-out, six feet of snow overnight at 10,000', running out of daylight and no tent as we were skiing into the Ostrander Hut. The GPS could have turned it into a cakewalk. We had to build a shelter, and wait out the storm. We were fine, but another group declined to stay in the bivouac with us, and ended up lost for days with serious frostbite and subsequent multiple digit amputations.

So to me, even if it languishes in the bottom of the pack, it's worth the extra (I-never-weighed-it-so-I-don't-know-how-many) ounces.


--------------
I'm more comfortable with unanswered questions than I am with unquestioned answers.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 28
waterdog Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 466
Joined: Sep. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 12:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Dave Senesac @ Apr. 05 2013, 11:44 am)
QUOTE
User guide was created by a non-English speaking sub-moron.

Are you assuming that because it was created by someone who apparently spoke English-as-a-second-language (or third, or fourth), they were obviously a "sub-moron"?

Have you looked at some of the posts here with a critical eye for spelling, grammar, syntax, and punctuation?

Better check your hat size--maybe you're becoming thick-headed or narrow-minded.


--------------
I'm more comfortable with unanswered questions than I am with unquestioned answers.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 29
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 43967
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 12:13 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Mostly for "micro" navigation. by that I mean I'll set the display to align with how I'm pointing the unit and set the scale so I've got a coverage only out a half mile or so and then I use the dispolay to "peek" over ridgelines to see what might be there that is worth the scramble as I go along. Some interesting ponds or a nice meandering stream or somehting and I'll head over that way.

It's a backup for reduced visibility emergency condiitons: never had to take advantage of that. But for a hike out in the dark, fog, blowing snow or all three it would be a huge aid.

What I imagine some would use it in mountain terrain for a fast check on how much more "up" there is to a pass, but for that I've got a Thommens analog altimeter that I keep easy to hand.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 30
Dave Senesac Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3481
Joined: Jun. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 12:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(waterdog @ Apr. 05 2013, 9:10 am)
QUOTE

(Dave Senesac @ Apr. 05 2013, 11:44 am)
QUOTE
User guide was created by a non-English speaking sub-moron.

Are you assuming that because it was created by someone who apparently spoke English-as-a-second-language (or third, or fourth), they were obviously a "sub-moron"?

Have you looked at some of the posts here with a critical eye for spelling, grammar, syntax, and punctuation?

Better check your hat size--maybe you're becoming thick-headed or narrow-minded.

Not wise to inject your own meaning into someone elses  terse statement without first requesting clarification.   In this case the manufacturer is Asian but they obviously did  not employ a native English speaking person in markets they sell that product, to write their user guide.  On web review sites the user guide has been roundly condemned.   As someone with considerable expertise over long years reading technical information, it is one of the worst mainly due to poor organization I've ever read.  Makes me wonder what level of mind is capable of producing something so poor which I emphasized with a terse dig at their mental level.


--------------
...David

http://davidsenesac.com
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
86 replies since Apr. 05 2013, 12:20 am < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


Page 1 of 3123>>
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply What do you use GPS for in the wilderness
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code



Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions