SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.


» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

Page 1 of 3123>>

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: How Did YOU get into the Outdoors...?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
rangersven Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3622
Joined: Jul. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 4:04 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Greetings, BPers...!!!

How did you get into the outdoors?  What led you to you outdoor passions?  Did you have an outdoor mentor?  Any special place from your past?

I remember playing along a small creek near a forest preserve in a large metro area; the area had plenty of pollution problems looking back on it as an adult---however, as a kid the green space allowed me the opportunity to explore the natural world and see things such as whitetail deer, fox, and coyotes.

Looking back on the area now, I'm really fortunate that the little green space led me to a lifetime of wonderful journeys and the wanderlust to move to some truly beautiful places...

Happy Trails,

RS


--------------
"Backpacker.com's Original Provocateur."
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 2
hikerjer Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 10943
Joined: Apr. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 4:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I just wanted to, so I did.  No mentor, no guiding light.  When I was a young
teenager, it just seemed like a cool thing to do.  And it was and is.


--------------
"Too often I have met men who boast only of how many miles they've traveled and not of what they've seen."  -  Louis L'Amour
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 3
Ben2World Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 25998
Joined: Jun. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 4:36 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My parents were profoundly uninterested in the outdoors.  Growing up in Asian metropolis... I never saw wide open, barely populated space until I came to Los Angeles!  Never did any hikes, not even day hikes.

But I loved traveling.  One day, back in 2004, aged 43, it suddenly occurred to me that while I'd seen many parts of the world, everything I'd seen was within a short radius from a town or a road!   THAT led me to try hiking.

I quickly signed up with a local outfitter (Adventure 16) for an overnight hike -- to learn the ropes, so to speak.  The same year, an EBay guy who sold me my first piece of gear (an MSR PocketRocket stove) offered to take me on a hike to the Wind Rivers, WY -- my virgin, multiday wilderness hike.  :)


--------------
The world is a book and those who do not travel read only a page.  -- St. Augustine
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 4
bill g Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 421
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 4:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I was a caddy starting at age 13. 1 loop was 5 miles; 2 was 10.Kinda progressed from there. Today I usually walk 5 miles a day with my dog. An hour in the morning and and an hour late afternoon. Backpacking just allows me to walk ever further and see some interesting parts of this continent.

--------------
you don't know what you got till it's gone
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 5
big_load Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 23904
Joined: Jun. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 5:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I grew up with hiking and camping.  I took my first car camping trip at three, when my younger sister would have been just starting to walk.
Online
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 6
ponderosa Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 4332
Joined: Jul. 2003
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 5:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The old lady next to me in my avatar pic is my remarkable grandmother.  I was taking walks in the woods with her as soon as I could walk.  Since she'd raised my dad in the same fashion, my childhood was spent outside, a good deal of it in the woods, mountains, and desert.  I think I was seven years old on my first multi-day trip in the Sawtooths.  I was a lucky kid.

--------------
The harder the toil, the sweeter the rest.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 7
TravisNWood Search for posts by this member.
W Y O M I N G
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 16608
Joined: Apr. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 5:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I grew up outdoors on a 36-square-mile ranch that my grandparents had homesteaded. It was on the Wyoming steppes on the edge of the Thunder Basin National Grassland, nearly desert in reality. The nearest neighbors were miles away. Before I ever attended school, I was riding horse or walking miles from home on land no plow or machine had ever touched.

We had no electric lines or phone lines, no TV or radio. But we had mountain lions walk the pasture in front of the house, bobcats and badgers walk through our yard, coyotes howling at night, rattlesnakes denning near the outbuildings. There was nothing much to do indoors but page through crates of National Geographic magazines my grandfather had collected since the late 1800's. That was our outdoor magazine with colorful pictures of strange lands, wildlife we could only imagine, and primitive societies of naked natives.

And every summer we took a camping vacation to National Parks or to the Colorado mountains where my other grandparents lived. They were hill people living primitive lives. On one such trip, a month before I started school, we camped in Yellowstone for a week. Bears along the road tried to crawl inside the car windows and roamed the campgrounds day and night.

One night, mid-week, camped at Yellowstone Lake, my family woke to the 1959 Yellowstone Earthquake that roared through the area like a freight train, toppled a mountain, moved highways, created a lake and frightened thousands of people. They left, we stayed. My dad was determined to see more of Yellowstone — earthquake or no. In another month I started school at a country schoolhouse with only six students over 30 miles from the nearest town.

Changes came slowly until I attended college in Laramie. There my older brother introduced me to backpacks, down sleeping bags, climbing ropes, and cross-country skis that took us deep into the mountains over several feet of snow. I was hooked and soon went solo. And I've been exploring ever since.


--------------
Location — Wyoming
Webpages — Cloud Peak Wilderness MapsRocky Mountain Wildlife
Photos — Bighorn Mountains — Wyoming Steppes
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 8
QCHIKER Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2360
Joined: Oct. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 6:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well when I was younger I always was playing over at the neighbors farm and then when I got old enough I joined Cub Scouts and then Boy Scouts and loved hiking and camping. Plus when I was in Scouts I used to go on solo hikes out behind my house in the woods and fields and down by a creek. I loved being outdoors and even thought about a career in something like conservation work. Even in High school and college I went for hikes, canoed and skied and enjoyed the outdoors as much as possible.  No special mentor othere than Mother Nature calling to me. Ever since I've enjoyed being outside and bping, hiking and canoeing.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 9
wycanislatrans Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2760
Joined: Nov. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 6:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Out the front door, sometimes out the back door.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 10
desert dweller Search for posts by this member.
Greetings
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 9837
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 6:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Minimal outdoor exposure as a kid, for me. The Boy Scouts and I didn't get along. Too structured, I thought.

After high school I joined the Army and ended up at Fort Huachuca here in southern Arizona. During the last year in the service I was befriended by my Platoon Sergeant who was retiring in a few years. During one of our many beer drinking sessions he brought up the idea of hiking into a place and staying the night. I had visions of army issued sleeping bags and hiking in combat boots with my field jacket for warmth carrying a ruck-sack. Well, that was exactly the stuff I owned.

After many day-hikes to get in shape and learn some basics, I was ready to do the overnight. I was 24 years old and thought I had things figured out. But, once I started backpacking and did my first solo, the seed of a new personal philosophy was sprouting and my outlook was redefined.

I got out and eventually started school. My buddy retired (and just divorced) also started school to get ready for his second career, teaching. We continued backpacking and got a lot of talking done. When he graduated he left Tucson for El Paso.

He has long since died. It was cancer. He never did stop smoking. But, he was my strongest mentor and I am continually grateful for our friendship. To this day I wonder why he took the time to instill in me the spark for wandering the wilderness.


--------------
Seek Higher Ground
Can you feel the silence


Photobucket
Flickr
YouTube
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 11
KaiWinters Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 72
Joined: Mar. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 6:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Grew up in a city but alongside a river, rail road tracks and small wooded areas all over. As soon as we, neighborhood kids, could sneak away from our parents we were exploring the river, swam in our tighty whiteys, caught fish on hand lines and cooked/ate them on fires we made with matches of course, walked the tracks and explored every inch of the woods around. We made bows and arrows but never hit anything...whew we mostly aimed at each other.

My uncle car camped in Rutland VT at Emerald Lake and he would take me with his family.
Amazing what real forests looked like compared to what I knew.

Always did something outdoors growing up then with my wife and kids. We were always walking trails in the areas we lived but nothing that can be considered day hiking or backpacking.

My wife and I have become avid day hikers now that the kids are grown and living their own lives.
It has brought us closer together like we were before kids, work, etc.


--------------
Waking up is a great way to start your day...
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 12
Chuck D Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 7932
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 7:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

These two, this was taken a couple of years before I was born.

Attached Image
Attached Image

--------------
Everyone should be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry,
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 13
no_granola Search for posts by this member.
minor deity
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 13175
Joined: Dec. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 7:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A cracker in the shape of Jebus told me to do it.

--------------
I never imagined that being obnoxious would get me where I am today.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 14
hbfa Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 8300
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 7:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

High school buddies got me interested in backpacking.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 15
reubenstump Search for posts by this member.
Lago Grey
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2194
Joined: Sep. 2011
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 7:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TravisNWood @ Apr. 20 2013, 5:41 pm)
QUOTE
lots of stuff

You should write a book.  Or pamphlet, brochure, whatever.  Or at least a really long TR.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 16
reubenstump Search for posts by this member.
Lago Grey
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2194
Joined: Sep. 2011
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 8:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Chuck D @ Apr. 20 2013, 7:39 pm)
QUOTE
These two, this was taken a couple of years before I was born.

Chuck, that's fantastic.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 17
hikerjer Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 10943
Joined: Apr. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 9:12 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(QCHIKER @ Apr. 20 2013, 6:00 pm)
QUOTE
 No special mentor other than Mother Nature calling to me.

+1

--------------
"Too often I have met men who boast only of how many miles they've traveled and not of what they've seen."  -  Louis L'Amour
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 18
Montanalonewolf Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 7139
Joined: Mar. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 9:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

nm

--------------
If you are free to be a Liberal- Thank a person with a gun.

Those who don't read have no advantage over those who can't.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 19
SW Mtn backpacker Search for posts by this member.
Born to hike, forced to work ...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 7297
Joined: Jul. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 9:53 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

After getting to a ski condo with all the logistics and expense with the now ex-, I spotted some winter backpackers setting up on the snow in a neighboring vacant lot ... and said hmmmm.  Little did I know winter trips can be logistics intensive but it was the spark.

--------------
Usually Southwest and then some.

In wildness is the preservation of the world. - Henry Thoreau
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 20
JD_TREX Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 9769
Joined: May 2003
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 10:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I first got into the outdoors taking car camping trips with the family to lake Tahoe as a young kid living in California. But didn't really know anything about the outdoors until my grandfather took my along with him on some section hikes of the AT. He was a really cool guy that enjoyed being out "roughing it" as he would call it. Later I returned to school at Olympia community college and took mountaineering as my PE class - hooked on mountains ever since.I don't get out much anymore,but I can tell you there is no cure for mountain fever.

--------------
HYOH  EYOF
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 21
llamapacker Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1023
Joined: Feb. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 11:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I was sure I'd be spotted if I tried to leave the country so hiding in the wilderness seemed like the only logical choice until my ex-father-in-law passed away and the rewards for my capture were withdrawn.  I sort of took a liking to it.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 22
rangersven Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3622
Joined: Jul. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 11:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Lots of interesting stories here...!!!  THX for sharing...

DD, I remember you posting about your old platoon sergeant in the past.  Sounds like you were really lucky to have a pal like that...!!!  Your post reminds me of an old English teacher I had.  I'm going to give him a call as I have not talked to him in a bit.

DD, do you have a pic of Ed Abbey's house in Tucson?  I seem to remember you posting about driving by his house and being suprised at how nondescript it was.

Happy Trails,

RS


--------------
"Backpacker.com's Original Provocateur."
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 23
Three Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1075
Joined: Dec. 2011
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 11:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Scouts...and camping and exploring was just what boys did when and where I grew up.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 24
tarol Search for posts by this member.
Well I never!
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 11177
Joined: Mar. 2003
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 1:07 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My parents were both outdoorsy folks.  My Grandpa was a camper/fisherman/boater until the end of his days and passed these loves along to my Dad.  My Great-Grandpa on my Mom's side was the foreman of a huge ranch in the middle of no-where, Wyoming, and that's where my Mom lived during much of her youth.  So my parents' favorite past times were camping/fishing/boating/exploring.  After my sister was born, but before I was, they decided to move to an area above Bishop, CA at the 8,000' elevation near the John Muir Wilderness.  It was here that they lived when I was born.  Growing up surrounded by the majestic Eastern Sierra and going camping, exploring, and kayaking therein, well, yeah, both my sister and I developed an intense love of the grand landscape around us.  Not only do we pursue this during our off time, but she works for the Nature Conservancy, I work for the US Forest Service - in our own ways trying to preserve the great outdoors.

--------------
Got elevation? www.tarol.com
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 25
Owen571 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1010
Joined: Apr. 2011
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 1:56 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My grandfather had me fishing and shooting when I was still a toddler. Cub Scouts, Webelos, Boy Scouts, Airborne Infantry; always loved being out in the woods, and still do.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 26
RebeccaD Search for posts by this member.
Double Arch, Arches N.P.
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 11537
Joined: Jul. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 3:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Family traditions.  My Mom grew up hiking and backpacking, my Dad learned it in the Scouts, and I am a little younger than I might be because Mom didn't want to be pregnant during the summer backpack trip ;)

But when I was growing up it was mostly car-camping, as we didn't have gear for backpacking (nor money; apparently we were unwilling to carve packboards out of 2X4s as they did when Mom was young).  But I somehow had the bug, and it just lay mostly dormant until I got really lucky in a housemate when I started grad school.  He was a major backpacker and introduced me to all his backpacking friends.  Soon I was soloing if I couldn't find company (well, as soon as I was able to lay hands on a car so I could get to the trails).

Thanks, Trapper--I owe you!


--------------
Writerly thoughts, book reviews, and random short fiction found at
The Ninja Librarian Blog
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 27
BradMT Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 4031
Joined: May 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 7:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TravisNWood @ Apr. 20 2013, 3:41 pm)
QUOTE
I grew up outdoors on a 36-square-mile ranch that my grandparents had homesteaded. It was on the Wyoming steppes on the edge of the Thunder Basin National Grassland, nearly desert in reality. The nearest neighbors were miles away. Before I ever attended school, I was riding horse or walking miles from home on land no plow or machine had ever touched.

We had no electric lines or phone lines, no TV or radio. But we had mountain lions walk the pasture in front of the house, bobcats and badgers walk through our yard, coyotes howling at night, rattlesnakes denning near the outbuildings. There was nothing much to do indoors but page through crates of National Geographic magazines my grandfather had collected since the late 1800's. That was our outdoor magazine with colorful pictures of strange lands, wildlife we could only imagine, and primitive societies of naked natives.

And every summer we took a camping vacation to National Parks or to the Colorado mountains where my other grandparents lived. They were hill people living primitive lives. On one such trip, a month before I started school, we camped in Yellowstone for a week. Bears along the road tried to crawl inside the car windows and roamed the campgrounds day and night.

One night, mid-week, camped at Yellowstone Lake, my family woke to the 1959 Yellowstone Earthquake that roared through the area like a freight train, toppled a mountain, moved highways, created a lake and frightened thousands of people. They left, we stayed. My dad was determined to see more of Yellowstone — earthquake or no. In another month I started school at a country schoolhouse with only six students over 30 miles from the nearest town.

Changes came slowly until I attended college in Laramie. There my older brother introduced me to backpacks, down sleeping bags, climbing ropes, and cross-country skis that took us deep into the mountains over several feet of snow. I was hooked and soon went solo. And I've been exploring ever since.

Travis, your young life would have been an enviable one to many... but you likely know how special it was, in spite of its obvious hardships.

The 1959 quake was something else... shut down a geyser at the ranch I worked at the last couple years. The basin is still there but it's dry. The hot springs, however, remain.

A good friend of mine was in his mama's womb that day. His mother and father were camped at THE campsite at what is now quake lake. She woke up in the middle of the night with a premonition of disaster and made her husband pack up their entire kit and go down the road... everyone in that campsite died that night.


--------------
Contentment is natural wealth, luxury is artificial poverty. – Socrates
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 28
wwwest Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 6733
Joined: Dec. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 9:11 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Both my grandparents homesteaded in Colorado, and my Dad got a homestead in Idaho in 1951, where we grew up, not too much different than TravisNWood.  Not quite as isolated, but total immersion in the outdoors raising cattle and horses.

Still on the land in Colorado.


--------------
"The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness."

- John Kenneth Galbraith
Online
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 29
TDale Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 15496
Joined: Jun. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 9:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My grandparents were farmers.  I stayed with them while my parents worked.  I was close to the earth from day one.  My grandmother had me fishing before I could talk.  Yes, my grandmother.  So, I never got INTO the outdoors.  It's always been part of my life to be outdoors.

--------------
"Sure as I know anything, I know this - they will try again...They'll swing back to the belief that they can make people... better. And I do not hold to that. So no more runnin'. I aim to misbehave."
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 30
TravisNWood Search for posts by this member.
W Y O M I N G
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 16608
Joined: Apr. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 10:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(BradMT @ Apr. 21 2013, 5:00 pm)
QUOTE
Travis, your young life would have been an enviable one to many... but you likely know how special it was, in spite of its obvious hardships. . . .

Thanks, Brad. I think I learn to value those experiences more with each passing year.

--------------
Location — Wyoming
Webpages — Cloud Peak Wilderness MapsRocky Mountain Wildlife
Photos — Bighorn Mountains — Wyoming Steppes
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
72 replies since Apr. 20 2013, 4:04 pm < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


Page 1 of 3123>>
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply How Did YOU get into the Outdoors...?
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code



Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions