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Topic: Cooking in the outdoors, How important is good food to you?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 12:51 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

When I'm out backpacking, food just isn't that important to me.  Sure, I want it to be edible and it's nice it  tastes farily good but it's more important that it provides the energy I need and and is easy to cook up.  Now, for sure, I don't mind having people like Chuck along who is an outdoor gourmet and I certainly enjoy their cooking, but I don't think I'll ever get to that point.  How about you guys, how important is cooking tasty meals to you when backpacking?  Just wondering who I should plan my next trip with. :D

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 12:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Don't care. It's nice to have good food but if it's just an overnighter or two, cans of tuna or dehydrated crap is fine.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 1:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Same here. It's about the calories and protein.

Last hike (couple of weekends ago), I heated up the Mountain House Beef Stroganoff and added a pouch of spiced grilled salmon. It tasted fantastic and gave me 1000 calories and lots of protein.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 1:11 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Don't care. I look at energy out there in energy types (quick energy, rebuild energy, long-term carbs, etc). I am more concerned with stomach "stability" than flavor to be honest. Oh...and I don't like washing dishes so everything is cooked in a bag unless it is coffee. I avoid cooking in my pot like the plague.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 1:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I take foods that are palatable, nutritious, lightweight and easy to prepare. As long as the taste is good enough to encourage me to satisfy my hunger and energy needs, that's all I care about in that regard. I'm not a spice fan even at home.

The idea of a tasty feast in the wilderness is just fine, but it's not my priority. Others may vary, and that's fine, too.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 1:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tigger @ Apr. 26 2013, 10:11 am)
QUOTE
Don't care. I look at energy out there in energy types (quick energy, rebuild energy, long-term carbs, etc). I am more concerned with stomach "stability" than flavor to be honest. Oh...and I don't like washing dishes so everything is cooked in a bag unless it is coffee. I avoid cooking in my pot like the plague.

I have two pots. One is dedicated tojust boiling water. The other, smaller one, is for cooking (rehydrating) evening meals. Both are "non-stick".

When I'm done eating, directly out of the pot, clean-up is just wiping it out with grass, pine needles, snow or whatever won't scratch the non-stick. I'm not worried about germs and such because the pot will be heated up when next cooking in it.

Personally, I can't stand eating out of the pouch the dehydrated food comes in. I wonder what chemical the pouch is lined with and if it's water and/or oil soluable. The empty pouch become a place to put trash since most are sealable.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 1:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Count me among the "I do not care" group.  I can live for 5-6 days off most anything, and have.  Hell, I could live off of stored fat that long, but my stomach would be growling.  I have eaten Mt H, Packit Gourmet, home dehydrated, potato buds, stove top, and just plain peanut butter on a spoon.  Mostly, it is all the same to me.  

Someone already said, it must make me want to finish my meal, and that is my main requirement.  I can eat nuts, slim jim's, tuna, or salmon for protein.  Calories are the most difficult thing to pack for a week long trip.  I may begin to experiment with things like potato chip crumbs, or those fried onions.  High calorie per ounce things I would not normally eat, but like.   A handful of peanuts, some beef jerky, and a nut bar like those Salty and Sweet things by Nature Valley, and I can call that lunch.

I do all of my dinner meals as FBC.  I was eating a full serves 2 Mt H meal, but I may need to repackage them now that I am aging.  I find it sometimes difficult to eat all of a serves 2.  Might be repackaging them by making 3 serves 2 into 4 meals.  I will also experiment with soups, like the Bear Creek Broccoli and Cheddar, and just add a packet of salmon or tuna.  


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 1:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

One more "not a big deal" vote here. As long as I don't eat the same thing for dinner every night, I'm good.
A couple thoughts...

1. I am the cook in my family, and it's something I enjoy and do well. So, I eat very well in regular life...I don't need to eat gourmet the (sadly small) number of nights I'm in the backcountry.

2. I tend to not have a lot of appetite once I get to camp on the first 1-3 days of a high elevation BP trip (which is where most of my trips are). At that point, eating is really for sustenance, not pleasure. I love the ritual of preparing the meal and all, but I just don't have the appetite.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 2:26 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My sentiments mirror yours on this topic hikerjer.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 2:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Guess I represent the other, dark side as I enjoy eating well (dinners) in the backcountry, especially when out for 10 – 12 days.
Trail margaritas and cheese usually appear at 5:00...
Afterwards, doesn't take long to saute a lil garlic, wild onions, add some pepper flakes, maybe tomato oil paste and miscellaneous spices…few chunks of Asiago…add to pasta with a drizzle of olive oil – damn fine eating. Of course, we regularly add a few 2-pound, freshly caught trout (cooked over the fire coals in foil packages) and this addition tends to demand something more culinary appealing than Boil-n-Bag Chili Mac.

Just saying, does not have to be complicated.
HYOH


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 2:36 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

When backpacking, weight is always the limiting factor but on overnighters or canoe trips I like to pay a little more attention to the culinary arts. I enjoy a nice steak & baked potato or a stirfry out in the backcountry after an adventure filled day. This is why I've always preferred a white gas stove to a flame thrower.

Below is one of my favorite ways to start the day on these occasions.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 2:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(markskor @ Apr. 26 2013, 2:28 pm)
QUOTE
Guess I represent the other, dark side as I enjoy eating well (dinners) in the backcountry, especially when out for 10 – 12 days.
Trail margaritas and cheese usually appear at 5:00...
Afterwards, doesn't take long to saute a lil garlic, wild onions, add some pepper flakes, maybe tomato oil paste and miscellaneous spices…few chunks of Asiago…add to pasta with a drizzle of olive oil – damn fine eating. Of course, we regularly add a few 2-pound, freshly caught trout (cooked over the fire coals in foil packages) and this addition tends to demand something more culinary appealing than Boil-n-Bag Chili Mac.

Just saying, does not have to be complicated.
HYOH

Jeeze, that makes the rest of us look like culinary barbarians which I guess we are.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 2:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

ArrRrgg. I likes my food on a stick.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 3:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Marmotstew @ Apr. 26 2013, 11:51 am)
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ArrRrgg. I likes my food on a stick.

What's her name?

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 3:11 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Feed me.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 3:34 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Don't care. I've got stuff like Enertia Trail Foods meals for vacations where I get to be out for 4-5 days, but the rest of the time I'm usually only out for 1 or 2 nights. I completely lose my appetite the first couple of days on the trail, especially in warm weather, so often just take some granola bars. In cold weather, I splurge with a packaged meal, oatmeal, coffee and hot chocolate, and extra snacks.
I imagine I'd be singing a lot different tune if I was able to get out for weeks at a time, though, because day 3 and up I want something resembling real food.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 3:36 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Instant anything or ready made.  Hell, I don't even cook at home.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 6:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Um, what do you think my answer will be?

:D :D


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 6:11 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Although this is a pretty good "meal" after hiking.



:D


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 6:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My answer has been Sarbar's recipes for along time.  Except for that salmon chowder.  That's when I found out I was milk intolerant.  Not pleasant.  Tasty when I ate it, though.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 6:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Oopsies. Sorry ol' chap ;-)

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 7:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I like my hot meals and I lose too much weight if I don't scarf the calories.  Llama packing is hard play and I have the room so I reward myself with good food.  My little home made table is assembled from scraps: 5/32 plywood, poplar wood, PVC pipe and hook & loop material.  It breaks down in seconds without tools and weights less than 3 lbs.  It goes on every trip along with two stoves, three pots, one fry pan with a folding handle and a few utensils.  I've also made myself a nice little cooler for produce and frozen goods.  The best meals are on layover days, I usually munch gorp on relocation days.   
I'm sure if I were backpacking I would be looking at meals differently. However, I don't remember ever being turned down when I offered a meal to a backpacker.  



taste great on a cool morning
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 7:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Can I come?

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 9:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Am a rather ignorant cook.  Could use a wife for several reasons including being fed better.

Recall that long thread on this board from a few years ago where most people admitted they don't have much of an appetite while backpacking.  But in same thread many related they can't wait to hit the first fast food place or restaurant after reaching civilization.  That raises an amusing psychological flag with those that say they don't much care what they eat if they also can't wait to feast upon return.  

I and those I've backpacked with most, eat more in the backcountry than at home because the exertion  makes us more hungry.   We bring a variety of snack foods, and rich foods, most of which we don't eat at home and at least one double person dinner per day (often packaged freeze dried) unless we are sure to be catching trout. It is true some days in the backcountry I am too busy to eat for long hours some days but that mirrors my eating habits at home.  

Hikerjer stated good food and gourmet and if that is what he is talking about then my answer is whether in the backcountry or at home, I infrequently dine on what most people consider fine food or go out to restaurants.   As a simple person am quite satisfied and enjoy rather ordinary foods.   Most of my meals for decades has been vegetables, fruits, and grains with only occasionally meat or greasy foods and that is more likely fish or poultry.  For instance I almost never have pizza or ice cream unless out with others, not because it doesn't taste great but because such foods are unhealthy if eaten often.  

Have gone years at times rarely eating any breakfast or just having a single pop tart and 1/3 glass of milk then a light lunch.   So unintentionally have been on something like the Fast Diet.   Not because eating 3 typical rousing sit down American meals isn't a pleasurable pastime but rather because I always suspected it wasn't natural for our ancestors.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 10:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm from south Louisiana, where we spend dinners talking about great meals we've had in the past and desserts talking about what we're eating tomorrow.  Good food is good food, no matter where I am.  The lack of palatable options is what caused me to start creating my own recipes and dehydrating delicious foods.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 10:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm one who likes good food on the trail.  i also enjoy being able to eat more salt and fat than I do at home, though in reality the fat mostly staying in our lunches, where it doesn't mess up a bowl.  

But while I want tasty food, I do not want to cook out there.  So I'm another FBC person, and I put in all the work in advance.  I have only lost my appetite a couple of times in my life (at home or on the trail--I think both times were going from sea level to over 11,000' in under 24 hours, and after I tossed my cookies that one time I had to hunt up more food, because I was starved).

We always indulge in a good burger, fries and shake after a trip, but in reality it's the fresh fruit and veg I miss most.  The last two years, we've come out of our week-long BP and had the burgers for lunch--and then had a mountain of fruit and a bagel for dinner!


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 11:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Don't care. I'm eat to live, not live to eat, on trail and off.  It's a means to an end.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2013, 11:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I can do the "food is simply fuel" thing, but it doesn't take much more effort in the backcountry to eat well.

I enjoy experimenting with home dehydrated meals at home to enjoy on the trail. depending on the trip, I will take some one pot, home made meals or may scale up to taking an Outback Oven and making Pizza, Bread, cake, Calzones, etc- usually on trips that I am fishing (the Outback Oven uses a 10" frypan as it's base).

And wine. My wife and I like to bring good wine in Platypi into the back country.

The 15 pound bakpacking base weight allows us to bring some indulgences. Kayaks do too....they can carry a lot of stuff.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 27 2013, 11:54 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Most of the time I don't spend much time - I know what I like to eat and I bring it and it doesn't need much preparation/cooking/sometimes no cooking at all.  

Occasionally when camping with a group I've made a bigger deal of it.  Like our trip to Santa Cruz Island a couple of years back - and our trip to Isle Royale.  I guess islands make me want to eat better, lol


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 27 2013, 1:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I don't like spending inordinate amount of time or energy cooking meals while out on the trail. Having said that, meals are important beyond just supplying sufficient supply of energy.  Meals help make the trip better, just as much as a good view.  A taste treat provides a great psychological boost. That is why certain foods almost always get taken along regardless of the inconvenience.

Ldyblade and I (mostly ldyblade) have developed a nice menu of trail recipes which we like.  We have spent time modifying and tweaking them to make them trail worthy.  So most of the work is done at home so that it is easy and efficient when out in the backcountry.  We eat well.  Our mealtimes are something to look forward to rather than simply endured. We encourage ourselves on tough trail days with conversation about what we are having for lunch, dinner, or the next day's breakfast.  Most of the time there is minimal set-up and clean-up.  Occassionally we opt for something a bit more challenging time and effort wise, but we make sure it is a low mileage day or something.  Overnighters are great to use as field tests because we have the opportunity to work out the kinks and/or decide if it is a keeper recipe or needs more tweaking.

One of the things my boys disliked about their early backpacking experiences were the unimaginative/boring meals I prepared.  To this day they still think of trail food as blah eating.  That was my biggest mistake in their backpacking training.

Rumi


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