SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.


» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

Page 1 of 212>>

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: Gluten Free< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
Marmotstew Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 9381
Joined: May 2006
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 10:14 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What's the deal? I know some people are allergic to it but it seems like everything is gluten free. Bread, beer, bacon, mayo, cheeseburgers, rocks, gerbils. I know some people who are gluten free that aren't gluten allergic. Is this like the Atkins diet or parachute pants?
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 2
RebeccaD Search for posts by this member.
Double Arch, Arches N.P.
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 11737
Joined: Jul. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 10:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I think you hit it.  The latest food fad, everyone wants to have special needs, or something. There are actually fairly few people who are truly gluten intolerant.  Then they market it and people think it's "health food," so they can go ahead and eat the whole cake, it's okay, it's gluten free!

--------------
Writerly thoughts, book reviews, and random short fiction found at
The Ninja Librarian Blog
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 3
mjeck Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 81
Joined: Mar. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 12:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Gluten free foods are very expensive, and there isn't a whole lot of choice (you must like rice-based bread, beer, pasta, oatmeal, etc.). We tried it to help my daughter's indigestion (it didn't) and dropped it. It's very popular in Europe wher much of gluten-free is imported from.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 4
TravisNWood Search for posts by this member.
W Y O M I N G
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 16715
Joined: Apr. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 12:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It's the work of glib global gluten gluttons gloating over the globs of gluten they've been gobbling.

--------------
Location — Wyoming
Webpages — Cloud Peak Wilderness MapsRocky Mountain Wildlife
Photos — Bighorn Mountains — Wyoming Steppes
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 5
reubenstump Search for posts by this member.
Lago Grey
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2272
Joined: Sep. 2011
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 12:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TravisNWood @ May 22 2013, 12:37 pm)
QUOTE
It's the work of glib global gluten gluttons gloating over the globs of gluten they've been gobbling.

Gastronomic gorging.

But seriously, it's an issue for some people.  I don't know why - I'm not a doctor, nor do I pretend to be one on the internet.  Given my wife's nerve/spine issues which radiate into her arms, hands, knees, etc., have been virtually impossible to diagnose and have largely ruined her life, it's hard for me to be glib about the trials someone else may be enduring.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 6
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 43972
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 12:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Uh oh, somebody missed their weekly dosage of Jessie....
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 7
lrh442 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 44
Joined: Mar. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 1:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Celiac disease affects about 2.5 million people in the US alone (1 in 133).  It is an autoimmune disorder that causes the body to attack the lining of the colon in the presence of the naturally occuring protein called gluten.  The only way to treat celiac is through a strict gluten-free diet.

Other people, while not having celiac, are considered gluten intolerant, and have an improved quaity of life if they limit or avoid gluten.  And, as pointed out by others here, some folks have neither celiac nor gluten intolerance, but are trying out a reduced gluten diet that they presumably hope will fix what ails 'em.

I don't suffer from celiac, but someone I love does, and I can attest that it is not a passing fad or amusing topic for those who have it.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 8
Lamebeaver Search for posts by this member.
trail? I don't need no stinkin trail!
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 19508
Joined: Aug. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 2:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Read this book.  I'm not necessarily gluten free (there's gluten in most beer  :D ) but I try to avoid wheat.

Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 9
Jim Fuller Search for posts by this member.
Benevolent Master
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3321
Joined: Apr. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 2:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Lamebeaver @ May 22 2013, 12:06 pm)
QUOTE
....  I'm not necessarily gluten free (there's gluten in most beer  :D ) but I try to avoid wheat.

Likewise.  When I finally listened to an old friend some 15-20 years ago and started trying to avoid wheat, I found that I feel better and do better without it (wheat).  But a little barley gluten is ... unavoidable.  :)

--------------
Uh-Oh
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 10
Ecocentric Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5227
Joined: Jun. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 7:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

This is important to some people, but not to everybody. The modern diet has exacerbated certain genetically inherited issues in the way we metabolize certain foods. For most of us, a varied diet works very well, but the food delivery industry is heavy to wheat, salt, and high fructose corn syrup. For investors, genetic mapping is a good bet, as people seek to understand how their bodies work. For most people, mix it up, there is a lot of good things to eat that aren't on the menu at your neighborhood fast food restaurant.

--------------
"Travel suggestions from strangers are like dancing lessons from God." -Kurt Vonnegut Jr.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 11
sarbar Search for posts by this member.
Hiker Trash
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 16825
Joined: Sep. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 7:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Honestly, I'll never mock faddy food choices at this point. I seriously believe that is why my 3rd (and youngest) son has severe food allergies. Oh yea, we are beyond special needs in our house. I'd say the special needs bus shows up everywhere :p :p Lol.......
No peanuts, nothing that was made on a peanut line, no eggs....about the only things commercially made my youngest can eat are gluten-free/8 common allergen free items. So yeah, I am grateful there is so much out there now. Makes shopping easier and he can have easy to grab foods when on the go. And at this point...I am avoiding any gluten for him to avoid even more allergic reactions, since we don't know what all of his triggers are.


--------------
Trail Cooking, Recipes, Gear and Beyond:
Trail Cooking & Freezer Bag Cooking
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 12
Lamebeaver Search for posts by this member.
trail? I don't need no stinkin trail!
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 19508
Joined: Aug. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 7:40 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It goes way beyond genetic mapping.  For those of us over 40, when you went to school, how many of you remember kids with food allergies?   I don't remember any.  Now, if you walk into a classroom there will be at least 2-3 in every class.  No one is sure what the cause is... pasteurized milk? azodicarbonamide? Something else?  Who knows?

When my wife was pregnant with out youngest, she had cravings for citrus...maybe too much vitamin C.

Seems like a lot more kids have asthma too.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 13
nogods Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 6393
Joined: Sep. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 7:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(lrh442 @ May 22 2013, 1:56 pm)
QUOTE
Celiac disease affects about 2.5 million people in the US alone (1 in 133).  It is an autoimmune disorder that causes the body to attack the lining of the colon in the presence of the naturally occuring protein called gluten.  The only way to treat celiac is through a strict gluten-free diet.

Other people, while not having celiac, are considered gluten intolerant, and have an improved quaity of life if they limit or avoid gluten.  And, as pointed out by others here, some folks have neither celiac nor gluten intolerance, but are trying out a reduced gluten diet that they presumably hope will fix what ails 'em.

I don't suffer from celiac, but someone I love does, and I can attest that it is not a passing fad or amusing topic for those who have it.

+1

My second daughter is struggling with it now.

Fortunately I live in WNY which has many Wegman's groceries.  The daughter of one of the principles of Wegman's has Celiac disease and Wegman's not only carries brand-name gluten product but has many of its own store-brand gluten free products not found elsewhere, and seems to have made the effort to identify by labels all of its regular products that are gluten fee
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 14
sarbar Search for posts by this member.
Hiker Trash
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 16825
Joined: Sep. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 9:36 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Lamebeaver...they did exist, it just wasn't as understood. My husband had severe egg allergies all through childhood. Eggs many grow out of (thankfully).

But I'll say this: wheat is very prevalent in our diets now across the US and so is highly processed food. As for asthma...there are some interesting theories on why it is getting stronger in numbers. The heavy use of Tylenol for kids is a scary read......


--------------
Trail Cooking, Recipes, Gear and Beyond:
Trail Cooking & Freezer Bag Cooking
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 15
Echo Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 7432
Joined: May 2008
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 9:53 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I think it was in an ad for that wheat belly book but I am not sure so I will just say somewhere,
Anyway I read the theory that wheat had been genetically modified in Mexico and even though it wasn't widespread. The pollen spread and now there is very little wheat that is anything like what our ancestors ate. The article said modern humans are basically unable to really metabolize modern wheat.

I have no facts on this just the certainty that I read that explanation recently somewhere.

Also in gluten intolerance I think the gluten kind of pastes down the cillae (sp?) lining the intestine which normally move the stuff through the intestine so it can cause almost a paralyzed bowel effect


--------------
If Light is in your heart, you will find your way Home. (Rumi)

The miracle is not to fly in the air, or to walk on the water, but to walk on the earth.  Chinese proverb

http://echo-echosvoice.blogspot.com/

http://duffybarkley.blogspot.com/
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 16
RumiDude Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 14410
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 11:59 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The actual science linking many of these faddish ideas to our diet is very thin.  There are things such as cilliac intollerant people, just as there are lactose intollerant individuals.  But thinking everyone should stop eating milk and milk products is silly.

There are hardly ANY food products we currently eat which have not been modified by humans.  Most do not resemble the original "natural" food at all.

So I don't mind others taking care of themselves and eating what is good for them.  But I don't automatically stop eating corn, wheat, milk, eggs, or whatever just because a friend tells me it helped them.  I don't discount other's reports about their particular experience, I just wonder if it would serve my own needs.

Also, despite the seriousness of gluten intollerance for those who have it, it doesn't bother me to hear or read jokes about it.  A good sense of humor is vital for living well.

Rumi


--------------
“This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all.”
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 17
TravisNWood Search for posts by this member.
W Y O M I N G
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 16715
Joined: Apr. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: May 23 2013, 12:24 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RumiDude @ May 22 2013, 9:59 pm)
QUOTE
. . . Also, despite the seriousness of gluten intollerance for those who have it, it doesn't bother me to hear or read jokes about it.  A good sense of humor is vital for living well.

I agree.

If you add up all foods some group has a problem with, we'd have to stifle a sense of humor anytime any food were discussed. After all, there is an obesity "epidemic." So is it wrong to joke about food because so many folks are obese and might be offended?

Is joking about beer wrong because there are so many alcoholics? Is joking about chocolate wrong because there are so many diabetics? Is joking about bacon wrong because there are people with heart disease or high cholesterol?

I don't see any "humor" in the thread that was callous or intentionally offensive. Maybe we need to take it all with a grain of salt — unless, of course, some readers are on a sodium-restricted diet and take offense at salt.


--------------
Location — Wyoming
Webpages — Cloud Peak Wilderness MapsRocky Mountain Wildlife
Photos — Bighorn Mountains — Wyoming Steppes
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 18
Lamebeaver Search for posts by this member.
trail? I don't need no stinkin trail!
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 19508
Joined: Aug. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 23 2013, 10:43 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What's a little joke - even on serious subjects - among friends?
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 19
wildlifenate Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5856
Joined: Jul. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 23 2013, 12:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My mom is celiac.  Had it for a really long time without realizing what it was and was "diagnosed" with all kinds of things that never really fit and whose treatments never really addressed her issues.

She went gluten free several years ago and a LOT of her health problems began resolving.

Unfortunately, however, she is also very intolerant of carbohydrates, too.  Can't have sugar.  Many fruits and vegetables are out.  She can't even eat a lot of the manufactured gluten free stuff because she can't eat rice flour.  She eats a lot of leafy green vegetables, beans, nuts, fish, and meat.

But yeah, there's a huge gluten free fad out there that's pretty ridiculous.  For example, Dominos has a "gluten free" pizza crust.  Except it's not really gluten free.  It's made in the same place as their regular crust so there's huge problems with cross contamination.  People with actual celiac and gluten intolerance still can't eat it.  But it's great for the fad dieters.


--------------
The GPS Geek
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 20
RebeccaD Search for posts by this member.
Double Arch, Arches N.P.
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 11737
Joined: Jul. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 23 2013, 1:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RumiDude @ May 22 2013, 8:59 pm)
QUOTE
The actual science linking many of these faddish ideas to our diet is very thin.  

There are hardly ANY food products we currently eat which have not been modified by humans.  Most do not resemble the original "natural" food at all.

What Rumi says.  With regard to the whole "Wheat Belly" thing and the theory Echo mentions above, read this article from the Berkeley Wellness Letter, which is something like the Consumer Reports of health (i.e., not funded from the industry, and making a good effort to report the best science available).

http://www.berkeleywellness.com/healthy....t-wheat


--------------
Writerly thoughts, book reviews, and random short fiction found at
The Ninja Librarian Blog
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 21
RumiDude Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 14410
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: May 23 2013, 8:13 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Interesting stuff there, Rebecca.  Not always, but many times it is simply someone construction an hypothosis with scattered facts from different areas.

Rumi


--------------
“This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all.”
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 22
swimswithtrout Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 8013
Joined: Jan. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 12:36 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RebeccaD @ May 23 2013, 11:03 am)
QUOTE

(RumiDude @ May 22 2013, 8:59 pm)
QUOTE
The actual science linking many of these faddish ideas to our diet is very thin

What Rumi says.. read this article from the Berkeley Wellness Letter, not funded from the industry, and making a good effort to report the best science available).

http://www.berkeleywellness.com/healthy....t-wheat

+1

The Snopes report for the diet hoaxes.


--------------
Want to see The Wind River Range in widescreen 1080p ?
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 23
mossy Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 938
Joined: Aug. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 10:20 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

No offense to the U of Berkley but I'm not buying it. It also doesn't help that an author(s) are not listed, nor is there and link to studies mentioned or experiments performed (sorry, my bio-med researcher kicked in).

I am not a follower/reader of this wheat belly book but I do follow a Paleo/Mediterranean(sans grains) diet. I seek out whole foods and avoid grain/bread products. At nearly 50, I'm in better shape than I was in my late twenties. It isn't just gluten that is the problem, except for Celiac's, lectins are also concentrated in many grain products and have been linked to leptin resistance (http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6823/5/10) a pre-diabetic condition leading to obesity.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 24
RebeccaD Search for posts by this member.
Double Arch, Arches N.P.
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 11737
Joined: Jul. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 11:02 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Mossy, just so you know, the Wellness Letter is produced for a general audience and is generally looking at a range of research.  It is true that they do not publish the links to the studies, but they are considered reliable.  

From my perspective, we are omnivores.  Avoid processed foods, do your own cooking, and stick to whole grains, and odds are good for staying healthy.  Every time someone tells me "this is better because it's how our prehistoric ancestors ate," I want to point out that a) they lived a very active life and probably ate--needed to eat--anything they could get their hands on, and b) they didn't live long enough to develop heart disease, cancer, etc. (All of which would have been moot for me, given that my crappy vision would have killed me by age 10.)

Research continues to suggest that the "Mediterranean diet" high in fruits, veggies, olive oil and red wine (right?) is the way to go.  Variety also seems our best protection against pollutants and other issues (eg. arsenic in rice reminds me that using a variety of whole grains is better than sticking to one).

Ultimately, we each have to find what works for us, and moderation in all things is a good start (okay, moderation in all things except backpacking.  You can't have too much of that).


--------------
Writerly thoughts, book reviews, and random short fiction found at
The Ninja Librarian Blog
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 25
wildlifenate Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5856
Joined: Jul. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 8:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

true that, Rebecca.  I have a friend who is trying so hard to stick to a strict "Paleo" diet and talks about her struggles a lot.  the whole idea is pretty ludicrous to me.

I dunno about your ancestors, but my ancestors ate whatever was edible to survive.  it included root vegetables and legumes.  some of them ate some things that weren't edible and found themselves as evolutionary dead ends.

as far as dietary intolerances go, there's a spectrum.  for nearly any given food, there's someone out there who's going to be intolerant to it at some level.  will it be a full blown life threatening anaphylactic reaction?  maybe, maybe not.  maybe it'll just give you the $hits for the night if you eat too much of it.

hell, I have a dog that's allergic to chicken.  it is what it is.

I'm of the philosophy that if it doesn't give you problems, eat it, but watch your quantities.


--------------
The GPS Geek
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 26
RebeccaD Search for posts by this member.
Double Arch, Arches N.P.
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 11737
Joined: Jul. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 10:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(wildlifenate @ May 24 2013, 5:45 pm)
QUOTE
I dunno about your ancestors, but my ancestors ate whatever was edible to survive.  it included root vegetables and legumes.  some of them ate some things that weren't edible and found themselves as evolutionary dead ends.


I'm of the philosophy that if it doesn't give you problems, eat it, but watch your quantities.

Well, if they ended as dead ends, they weren't your ancestors ...

And I totally agree about eating everything I can digest, in moderation.


--------------
Writerly thoughts, book reviews, and random short fiction found at
The Ninja Librarian Blog
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 27
wildlifenate Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5856
Joined: Jul. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 8:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RebeccaD @ May 24 2013, 9:39 pm)
QUOTE
Well, if they ended as dead ends, they weren't your ancestors ...

not direct ones... but if they were siblings to my direct ancestors, I think that counts for something.

--------------
The GPS Geek
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 28
Ben2World Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 26410
Joined: Jun. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 9:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RebeccaD @ May 24 2013, 7:39 pm)
QUOTE
And I totally agree about eating everything I can digest, in moderation.

Amen!

You mentioned earlier about 'everyone wanting to have special needs'.  I think there is some truth to that.  But I also believe many of the cases are physiologically real -- meaning more and more people do seem to develop intolerance / allergies toward more and more things.

One theory that's been passed around is that parents are being too vigilant about keeping the surroundings 'pristine and germ free' for their children -- to the latter's great detriment!

Not a scientist, but I subscribe to that theory.  Our bodies need a sufficiently "dirty" surrounding in order to strengthen the defense system -- to produce antibodies, etc.   But a clean environment reduces the challenges.  Imagine if parents were to do everything they can to keep their children from tiring themselves physically.  The unintended result is a bunch of weak-muscled kids with poor physical stamina.  And similar consequences with the children's immune system.


--------------
The world is a book and those who do not travel read only a page.  -- St. Augustine
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 29
RebeccaD Search for posts by this member.
Double Arch, Arches N.P.
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 11737
Joined: Jul. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 26 2013, 12:48 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You may have something, Ben.  My second ate dirt by the (toy) shovelfiul, and he has an immune system to die for.  Er, that doesn't come out right.  But, seriously, he hardly ever gets sick. To be sure, neither does my mother, so it's hard to tease out the environmental from genetic aspects there.  But I can assure you my kids have never been kept too clean :D

Attached Image
Attached Image

--------------
Writerly thoughts, book reviews, and random short fiction found at
The Ninja Librarian Blog
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 30
Lamebeaver Search for posts by this member.
trail? I don't need no stinkin trail!
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 19508
Joined: Aug. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 26 2013, 9:48 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

While I can agree with the "everything in moderation" philosophy to some extent, there are some things that are just plain not good for you in any quantity, so I would strongly encourage avoiding wherever possible.

hydrogenated oils, for example.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
41 replies since May 22 2013, 10:14 am < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


Page 1 of 212>>
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply Gluten Free
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code



Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions