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Topic: the non-backcountry cooking thread< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 25 2014, 10:28 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If such a thread already exists, please direct me there.

I thought that with such a varied group as this, there must be many fine cooks. Many fine cooks means recipes to share and so I created a thread for us to do just that.

Please, share your favorite recipe. (I'll dig out my simple crab dip recipe in the morning).


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 25 2014, 11:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

desert dweller used post some great food pics.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 12:08 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Good idea.  Here is one of my fall favorites.  Get yourself some local brewed IPA, some local grown corn, some fresh caught dungeness crab, dips and good company.  Dig in.



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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 12:18 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(llamapacker @ Apr. 25 2014, 10:08 pm)
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Good idea.  Here is one of my fall favorites.  Get yourself some local ......, some local ........., some fresh caught dungeness crab

You had me going. but that won't work well here in CO.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 12:29 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Just substitute some nice fat brook trout for those water bugs, and voila!

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 6:25 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Summer is coming, so I'll submit a summer favorite.

Tomato pie.  I actually have a recipe for it, but always wing it in the end.

Saute some chopped onion and garlic from your backyard.
Lightly cook a couple of slices of bacon.
Place a pie crust in a pan or pie dish.
Alternate layers of heirloom Brandywine tomatos from your backyard, mozarella, oregano and basil from your front yard, and the sauteed onion, garlic, and chopped bacon.
Cook like a regular pie.

Consume and enjoy.

Tomatos that are too juicy can turn this into tomato soup, so you might want to get some of the moisture out of the tomatos before putting them in the pan.








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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 1:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(swimswithtrout @ Apr. 25 2014, 9:18 pm)
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(llamapacker @ Apr. 25 2014, 10:08 pm)
QUOTE
Good idea.  Here is one of my fall favorites.  Get yourself some local ......, some local ........., some fresh caught dungeness crab

You had me going. but that won't work well here in CO.

Dungeness crab is one of the many perks of living in the PNW.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 1:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Orange Carnitas
Serves 4    700 cal per serving

1 pound fat trimmed boned pork shoulder or butt
2 tspns grated orange peel
1 onion peeled and chopped
2 cups orange juice
1 1/2 tspns ground cumin
1 can black beans (15 oz)
1/3 cup thinly sliced green onions (including tops)
8 warm tortillas
1/2 cup nonfat sour cream
1/3 cup tomato salsa
salt

Cut pork into ¼ to ½ inch cubes.  Put a 10 -12 inch non stick frying pan over high heat, add pork, and stir often until meat is gray, 5 – 6 minutes.

Add orange peel, 1 cup orange juice, and cumin to pan.  Stir often over medium-high heat until liquid has evaporated and meat is lightly browned, about 20 minutes.  Add ½ cup orange juice, scrape browned bits free, and stir until juice evaporates, about 5 minutes.

Add black beans and remaining ½ cup orange juice and stir just until beans are hot, about 2 minutes.

Serve pork mixture in warm tortillas, adding green onions, sour cream, salsa, and salt to taste.  Roll to enclose filling.

I have done this using beef, pork, chicken, and vegetarian, which reduces the calories per person by about 150 or so.  I prefer black beans, but have used red or pinto also.  Sometimes I eat it like a fajita, and sometimes just with a fork, using the tortillas as bread to push food around my plate.  This is always a hit when I serve it to friends.  


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 2:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Mmm, Olzeke, I'm going to try that tomorrow.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 3:40 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Looks like I left out the chopped onion.  Add it with the orange peel and cumin, in the first orange juice combination, or if you like your onions a bit less cooked, in with the second OJ combination..  Garlic makes a nice addition also.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 4:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Sorry, I can't post recipes cause I never measure anything.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 6:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yeah, I don't measure, either

And rarely do a dish from scratch the exact same way twice

We do Mexican food a lot - healthy, no lard or frying - tacos and taco salads and fajitas and enchiladas

I also love to do Chicken 'n' Dumplings

But I don't cook as much from scratch as I used to - I work full time and have a two-year-old!  

Fortunately my Mom, who babysits him twice/week, likes to do crock pot meals for us.  We just had roast with tender carrots and red potatoes.  It was yummy and fall-apart tender.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 7:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That's a tough act to follow Zeke, they sound delicious.  That said, here's my own crab dip recipe.  Parenthetical notes are my reminders but the recipe works real well in it's original form.

Jim's Crab Dip

1 lb crabmeat

1/2 pint of sour cream ( I use a little less)

3 tblsp. lemon juice ( I use a quarter of a fresh lemon)

1/2 cup Cheddar cheese, 1/4 in dip and 1/4 on top, (I add a little more in the dip and a lot more on top)

2 8oz cream cheese at room temp.

1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce (+ a dash more)

1 tsp. seafood seasoning ( I use old bay and at least a heaping tablespoon)

2 tblsp. horseradish ( I use creamy horseradish, If regular horseradish maybe a little less)

Mix everything but crab meat and 1/4 cheese until blended. Gentle fold in crab meat. Sprinkle on remaining cheese and paprika if desired. Bake at 350 until bubble and crusty about 30 minutes. Serve hot with French bread and or crackers

The recipe doubles well.  I always go heavy on the Old Bay and the shredded cheddar.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 7:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I am suffering here without a grill (ours finally rusted to oblivion). This time of year I want to grill everything.

Grilled Artichokes: Step by step

My favorite dipping sauce is plain greek yogurt (or mayo), balsamic vinegar, garlic, lemon, and herbs.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 7:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've never grilled artichokes, but this time of year and through the summer will see squash, zucchini, eggplant and asparagus all make regular appearances on the grill.  Grapeseed oil, black pepper and lemon are common accompaniments to all of them.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 8:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Nothing ground-breaking here, but I made some really nice quick pickles today with cucumbers I picked up at the farmers' market this morning.

For the tiny amount of work involved, they're quite tasty:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes....pe.html


(Love the new "stupid" addition to your sig line JiminMD!)


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 26 2014, 8:59 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Smoked brisket:

1) Get you a slab 'o meat
2) Trim the fat cap so that there is a thin layer of fat left
3) Slather that sumbich in mustard or honey or maple syrup or sumpin
4) Smother it in spices 'n herbs 'n brown sugar
5) Put it on the charcoal smoker for about 12 hours  at 225*F (use apple wood for smoke

While it's cooking:
1) Put a sauce pan on the stove
2) Add ketchup or tomato sauce
3) Add vinegar
4) Add honey
5) Add brown sugar
6) Add really spicy ground pepper
7) Add a ton of spices that you love

When the brisket hits 190* internal temp it's done.  Pull it off, wrap in foil and let rest for 30 minutes.  Slice it up.  Serve on a plate with sauce on the side, maybe some slaw and some corn on the cob.  Some folks like rolls to make sandwiches so I also supply thin slices of smoked provolone cheese--but that's a whole different weekend.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 27 2014, 9:52 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I cook nearly everything we eat - and yes, part of that is my occupation is food blogger and without doing that, I have nothing to write about - but most of all I do it so my youngest has something to eat. I cannot go to the store and feed him most ready-to-eat or commercially prepped food  :( He is my inspiration to take our food to a level most don't go to.

Don't get me wrong, I have plenty of days I don't want to cook for 3 kids  :laugh:  :laugh: Especially on days when they all whine and look down their noses at the old dinner plate.

Anyhow, we follow an egg/tree nut/peanut free house for him and a mostly plant-based diet (vegan) high in fiber diet that tends to the gluten-free side (he reacts to dairy and wheat as well, but not severely allergic, just itchy).

If all else fails, a quick dinner of gluten-free spaghetti tossed with olive oil that garlic and red pepper flakes were sautéed in, maybe some capers and a tiny bit of Parmesan cheese...well, you can't go wrong with that. Or this recipe I pulled together last week....yum!



Sweet & Sour Tofu

Ingredients:
14 to 16 ounce block extra firm tofu
6 tsp cornstarch, divided
2 Tbsp lower-sodium soy sauce (gluten-free if needed), divided
1/3 cup ketchup
¼ cup granulated sugar
¼ cup rice vinegar (unseasoned)
8 ounce can pineapple tidbits, drained and juice reserved
2 Tbsp olive or sunflower oil
1 Tbsp minced garlic
1 Tbsp minced ginger
1 green bell pepper, chopped
8 ounce can sliced water chestnuts, drained

Directions:
Drain tofu, wrap in several layers of new paper towels and drain, pressing gently. Cut in half horizontally, then in slices vertically, then into bite size pieces.
Heat a large non-stick skillet over medium-high, add in oil.
In a medium bowl, whisk 4 teaspoons corn starch and 1 Tablespoon soy sauce. Add tofu and gently turn to coat. Add to hot skillet, pan fry until golden and crispy, 4 to 6 minutes. Shake the pan often, scraping gently as needed.
Add in garlic and ginger, cook for 30 seconds.
Toss in bell pepper, water chestnuts and drained pineapple, cook, stirring often for about 5 minutes.
Meanwhile, in a medium bowl whisk together the remaining cornstarch and soy sauce, ketchup, sugar, rice vinegar and reserved pineapple juice. Pour over the tofu mixture, stir while the sauce comes to a quick boil, take off heat.

To serve:
I served the tofu over gluten-free rice/golden flax pasta, making 8 ounces worth.

Or maybe this:



Avocado & Pea Sandwiches

Ingredients:
2 ripe avocados
1 cup frozen green peas, thawed (no-salt added)
1 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
¼ tsp each ground black pepper and sea salt, or to taste
4 radishes, trimmed and thinly sliced

Directions:
Scoop the avocado out, mash with the remaining ingredients, except for radishes until somewhat chunky. Spread onto bread (freshly baked, if you happen to have some!), top with radish slices.
Makes 2 ultra thick or 4 thinner sandwiches.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 27 2014, 1:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(wwwest @ Apr. 26 2014, 12:29 am)
QUOTE
Just substitute some nice fat brook trout for those water bugs, and voila!

llamapacker- just delicious!

wwwest- Great idea!  I'm heading out tomorrow or the next day to fish a couple small, spring fed streams that hold the fabled fish, Brook Trout.  

The last Saturday in April in Michigan is the start of trout season.  Usually, I'm all over it and fish the entire weekend but my girlfriend had the weekend off (that happens rarely) so I decided to spend time with her and our dog.  

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 29 2014, 10:42 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm wishing there was a like button.

I only eat someone else's cooking about four times a month. My recipe is almost always "whatever is in the fridge." I do plenty of stir fries, and grill or use the smoker a lot.

My new thing is paella. I found a pan at Target for $12 (half price on sale) and I've used it twice on the grill. I think the enameled pan was a good choice. There are plenty of recipes online and it lends itself to whatever is available. This past weekend I used chicken, chorizo, shrimp, scallops, onions, fire roasted tomatoes, bell peppers, and peas. The trick seems to be all about the rice, which should be a short grained rice that soaks up about three times it's volume in broth. Bomba rice is the Spanish variety that none of our ethnic groceries stock and real Spanish chorizo may have to be ordered on the internet. I'm closing in on getting the crispy, caramelized layer that adds so much to both flavor and texture called the socarrat (think about those crispy corners of lasagna or mac & cheese).

My back porch is always a good place for food, drink, and conversation, but this is going to be one of those meals that will make a trailhead meal or car camping memorable. The pan is easier to transport than a Dutch oven and lighter than a skillet, so it could multi-task on a canoe or fishing trip as well.

Paella-Wikipedia

Seafood Paella, Tyler Florence

The Art of Paella


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 29 2014, 11:15 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I truly love paella and I'm fortunate to have Jose Andres' excellent restaurant "Jaleo" http://www.jaleo.com/bethesda/menu within a fairly short drive.  Much like good jambalaya, making paella myself has usually left me more frustrated than happy with the results.

While on the topic of celebrity chefs, I'd be remiss not to link to my favorite food network recipe.  Alton Brown's roasted turkey and brine is a favorite in my home and I roast a bird at least every other month.  It's a lot of prep time, but it's absolutly worth it.  The brine is also magnificent for soaking an oven stuffer for a quick week night dinner.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes....pe.html


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 29 2014, 11:46 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Another MD vote for paella.  I've never been to Jaleo, but in my area we have Jalapenos (Spanish/Latin American), and any of their paellas - or anything else - is always top notch.

Saffron, rice, poultry, seafood, fowl (sometimes a small bird or two), chorizo, tomatos...  That's good eatin'.   :)

We also have the small and informal Sin Fronteras (Latin American), and the new, also small and informal, Hispa, next to the older Hispa Market.  Lucky me.  :)
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 30 2014, 3:27 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I never caught those brookies wwest (via my previous post) but that "all you can eat"  crab leg buffet certainly sounds appealing right now llamapacker (that's our closest version of Midwest dungeness crab).

I am heading to the Two Hearted River for some Steelhead fishing Monday or Tuesday of next week.  I doubt it will be good fishing as the river will be high from the snow melt as well as the constant barrage of rain we have seen today and it's forecasted for the next couple of days.  

In any event, In the crazy odds that I  do tangle with a fish (I release all of the females), My recipe is this:  

1)Beer (and lots of it).   Any yes, even for cooking with as the wet ingredient.  A simple Budweiser will suffice.
2) Drakes mix:   http://drakesbattermix.com/
3) Deep Fryer
4) Salt and Pepper per your taste

Elegant, easy and yet irresistibly tasty but I have a feeling I'll be thinking of the crab leg "all you can eat buffet" after my two FULL days of fishing.  

Ya never know.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 30 2014, 9:00 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Ecocentric @ Apr. 29 2014, 7:42 am)
QUOTE

That looks delicious.  The wife has a new paella pan, maybe this will inspire her to do a seafood dish.  We eat a lot of seafood, but not much paella lately.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 30 2014, 2:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(steelhead @ Apr. 30 2014, 3:27 am)
QUOTE
I never caught those brookies wwest (via my previous post) but that "all you can eat"  crab leg buffet certainly sounds appealing right now llamapacker (that's our closest version of Midwest dungeness crab).

I am heading to the Two Hearted River for some Steelhead fishing Monday or Tuesday of next week.  I doubt it will be good fishing as the river will be high from the snow melt as well as the constant barrage of rain we have seen today and it's forecasted for the next couple of days.  

In any event, In the crazy odds that I  do tangle with a fish (I release all of the females), My recipe is this:  

1)Beer (and lots of it).   Any yes, even for cooking with as the wet ingredient.  A simple Budweiser will suffice.
2) Drakes mix:   http://drakesbattermix.com/
3) Deep Fryer
4) Salt and Pepper per your taste

Elegant, easy and yet irresistibly tasty but I have a feeling I'll be thinking of the crab leg "all you can eat buffet" after my two FULL days of fishing.  

Ya never know.


steelie

What size steelies do you catch in the Two Hearted?

Is it all catch and release?

Flies only, or can you use salmon egg clusters?

Fishing any good in late summer, early autumn?

I think I could make it there in August-September.

I have only fished for steelhead in Oregon and Washington and would love to find someplace closer to Wisconsin where I spend a lot of time these days.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 30 2014, 7:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

wwwest:

Question: What size steelies do you catch in the Two Hearted?

Answer: Two Hearted steelies typically range in the 3-5 pound range.  In recent years we have caught several 10 pound + fish.


Question: Is it all catch and release?

Answer: Per Michigan Inland Trout and Salmon Regulations, the Big Two Hearted River is labeled a #4 stream type which is:  "5 fish, but no more than 3 trout 15″ or greater".

Question: Flies only, or can you use salmon egg clusters?

Answer:  flies or spawn are acceptable.

Question: Fishing any good in late summer, early autumn?

Answer:  There is a decent run of Coho's but that normally starts in late August/early September.  There is an excellent run of steelies in the fall.  With the right conditions, I have caught steelies as early October 4.


Statement: I have only fished for steelhead in Oregon and Washington and would love to find someplace closer to Wisconsin where I spend a lot of time these days.

Response: I have never fished out west but it's on my wish list. I have researched several west coast Steelhead rivers and I'm simply awe-stricken in terms of how amazing it would be to fish out there!.  I was taking a gander on some of the Lake Michigan run Wisconsin side rivers and there appears to be several good, quality fishing for Steelhead!

Since I answered rather vaguely, you are welcome to pm me and I would gladly go into specifics with regards to the Big Two Hearted River!  

There are nicer (in terms of quality steelhead fishing)  rivers to fish on the Pere Marquette, Manistee, etc. but I prefer the nostalgia and peacefulness of the Two Heart (as well as less people, especially in the fall).  Give or take a couple of years, my best friend and I have been fishing the Two Heart since 1995.  


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PostIcon Posted on: May 01 2014, 11:40 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

There is nothing in this world that is better than a 2-3 pound steelie, grilled over the campfire, about two hours after pulling it from the water!

I will do research and planning, and you may be seeing me on the Big Two Hearted in early October!

Thanks.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 01 2014, 3:07 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

wwwest writes:  "There is nothing in this world that is better than a 2-3 pound steelie, grilled over the campfire, about two hours after pulling it from the water!"

I couldn't agree more! Yep, Plenty of times we have caught and cooked the fish over an open fire just off to the distance overlooking the river.  I like to wrap the fillets in aluminum foil with lemon wedges, butter and salt & pepper.  

wwwest writes: I will do research and planning, and you may be seeing me on the Big Two Hearted in early October!


Keep me updated with regards to that potential October trip.  It's an easy day trip for me (I live about three hours South of the river, in Gaylord, just under the Mackinaw Bridge).  I could meet up with you  and show you some of the better sections/holes.  


The other thing I love about fall steelhead fishing is they are fresh from Lake Superior (super shiny silver looking) and are amazingly strong.  Yep, even a 3 pounder gives you a heck of a good fight!  Landing percentages can be 50/50 on a good day. Some days, you don't even get as much as a fish on! To me at least, that just makes it more fun.  I love the challenge.  Timing is everything.  A couple days after a nice rain in fall during the Coho run bring large runs steelies into the river.  They can be aggressive!

Although we bring a drift boat during our multi-day fishing trips, my absolute favorite way to fish the river is good old fashioned bushwhacking.  I look at is doing my two favorite things simultaneously- hiking and fishing!!!!

steelie
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PostIcon Posted on: May 01 2014, 6:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Down here in the Deep South, catfish is the staff of life for most people.  My last wife's Cajun heritage inspired me to create this recipe:

Aquire a shaker of Tony Chachere's Original Seasoning.  Low salt is available and better tasting to me.

4 catfish fillets.  Store bought works best unless you can catch two identically sized catfish.  A total of 1.5 to 2 pounds of fillets.

Dice up about 2/3 to 3/4 of a cup each of onion, bell pepper, and celery.

Heat up a large fry pan and pour in two or three tablespoons olive oil.  Add two heaping tablespoons minced garlic.  Saute till golden.

Throw in the veggies.  Saute 'till onion softens.

Lay catfish on top of veggies.  Sprinkle liberally with Tony's.  It isn't that hot.  Cover.  Ten minutes or so, turn catfish.  Sprinkle liberally with Tony's again.  Cover.

When the fish is almost done, move it to a plate and keep warm in low heat oven.

Mix up some flour and warm water.  "We gonna make a roux now"

Turn up the heat.  Scrape the pan to loosen the good bits.  Pour in a little flour-water and stir, stir, stir.  Keep adding flour-water until you get a gravy consistency.  Remember, it will thicken more when off the stove.

BTW, you should have started and already have the rice ready.

Big scoop of rice on the plates.  Catfish fillet halfway on the rice.  Gravy/sauce over the fish and rice.  Serve.

I usually serve four with this as dividing it just means plating a second time.  You can add a side salad and serve eight with this recipe.  No one will be happy not having seconds.

I ain't bragging but this is an OMG dish.


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"Sure as I know anything, I know this - they will try again...They'll swing back to the belief that they can make people... better. And I do not hold to that. So no more runnin'. I aim to misbehave."
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PostIcon Posted on: May 01 2014, 6:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

That catfish recipe sounds amazing. My family is from south-central Georgia and I've had several dishes close to that, but none exactly like it. I'll have to try it this summer.

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