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Topic: Lost in the Wild, Danger and Survival in the North< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 25 2012, 12:30 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Cary J Griffith.

I just started reading this book last night,, and thus far it is very interesting.

Here is the exert from Amazon...

Book Description
Publication Date: April 15, 2007

In the wilderness, one false step can make the difference between a delightful respite and a brush with death.

On a beautiful summer afternoon in 1998, Dan Stephens, a 22-year-old canoeist, was leading a trip deep into Ontario’s Quetico Provincial Park. He stepped into a gap among cedar trees to look for the next portage—and did not return. More than four hours later, Dan awakened with a lump on his head from a fall and stumbled deeper into the woods, confused.

Three years later, Jason Rasmussen, a third-year medical student who loved the forest’s solitude, walked alone into the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness on a crisp fall day. After a two-day trek into a remote area of the woods, he stepped away from his campsite and made a series of seemingly trivial mistakes that left him separated from his supplies, wet, and lost, as cold darkness fell.

Enduring days without food or shelter, these men faced the full harsh force of wilderness, the place that they had sought out for tranquil refuge from city life. Lost in the Wild takes readers with them as they enter realms of pain, fear, and courage, as they suffer dizzying confusion and unending frustration, and as they overcome seemingly insurmountable hurdles in a race to survive.


“With admirable economy and a flair for suspense . . . [Griffith shows] how even well-prepared wilderness travelers can compound an initial blunder until they are in extreme danger—and what someone in their boots can do to increase his odds of surviving.”—Washington Post Book World

“Simply good reporting, offering an absorbing read and material for thinking about ourselves and the wilderness.”—Minneapolis Star Tribune

Cary J. Griffith is a freelance writer who specializes in writing about the outdoors.



That is from Amazon page, I have to agree so far.  I'll write back when I am finished reading the book with my final thoughts and comments.


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 25 2012, 12:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That is a great book, though it's easier to read if you skip every other chapter and then go back and read the chapters you skipped.

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 25 2012, 1:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(tomas @ Sep. 25 2012, 12:57 pm)
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That is a great book, though it's easier to read if you skip every other chapter and then go back and read the chapters you skipped.

Ha! Good idea. It does go every other chapter back and forth between each story. I kind of like it in an odd way though...keeps me interested..then gets me intrested in the other story...then back for a few pages...yadda yadda yadda.

I am enjoying both stories.


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 25 2012, 5:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Sounds good. I'll check it out.  I may have to read it "every other chapter", though, as I think I would get confused between the two stories.

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 26 2012, 7:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A pleasant suprise---I enjoyed it...

Happy Trails,

RS


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 26 2012, 7:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

At the Mercy of the Mountains: True Stories of Survival and Tragedy in New York's Adirondacks by Peter Bronski is similar, except each chapter is a complete story on its own, and many of them are not survival stories.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 27 2012, 6:12 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yes, I read At The Mercy of the Mountains, I enjoyed that book as well.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 03 2012, 11:57 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I like the collected stories of survival by Clint Willis.  There are titles like Ice, Epic, High, etc. for each individual geographic type of survival  (mountains, polar regions, water, etc.).  I'm always amazed at these types of stories.

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”Every tree was dripping and the creeks had swollen. It occurred to me that I had achieved a rare thing: I was living at the center of my heart’s geography. And I knew it.”- Bryce Andrews, Badluck Way
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 16 2012, 11:22 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ok, so I finished reading this book the other night. It was pretty good. There was a lot about the search and rescue for both stories.  I think it was an easy read and it wasn't confusing, being that it went back and forth between the 2 stories every chapter.  I like that it was true stories and real people. Overall, if you have not read this book, and you are an outdoors adventurer, I would recommend reading this book.  It's not so much a how to survive book, but if you like to read and enjoy reading books about the outdoors and hiking/camping..then  you will enjoy  "Lost in the Wild".

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 19 2012, 1:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Just finished this book.  I read one lost guy's story and then went back and read through the second lost guy's story.  I enjoyed the book.  Man, what a look at how thick those north woods can be.  That's quite a heads up for when I head up that way to paddle or hike.

Thanks for the suggestion.


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