SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.


» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

 

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: Headaches caused by sun/physical exertion, Anyone else have these problems?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
KestrelL Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 59
Joined: Jun. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 29 2012, 11:11 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've had problems with being in the sun and/or doing physical activity since about middle school (I'm currently 22).  I was wondering if anyone else had any of these symptoms and if they do, how they manage them, particularly when backpacking.

If it's hot and I'm out in the sun, even with a hat and sunglasses on, I'll feel nauseous and dizzy and often I'll have to sit down suddenly or I feel like I'll faint.  I feel like I have to eat something or I'll pass out.  Eating food usually helps with most of the nausea.

A headache comes along with this, although typically 20-60 minutes after when I first feel nauseous.  The headaches are usually resistant to typical painkillers and can last anywhere from an hour to 6 hours (although I usually end up going to bed before then because the headaches are really painful and I can't do anything but lay in bed).  If I take more that the recommended amount of painkiller right after I eat because I'm nauseous, I can sometimes lessen the intensity and longevity of the headache.

I can also get these symptoms if it's hot and I'm doing any sort of physical activity, even if it's out of the sun.

If I'm dehydrated, the headaches are worse, but even when I'm hydrated and I've eaten beforehand, I will still get the symptoms quite regularly.  If I don't wear sunglasses and a hat, I'll get the headaches and nausea much quicker.

So far I've avoided the headaches while backpacking/hiking by going when it's cool.  As everyone knows, this summer has not been cool at all and I've been having more issues because of that.  Anyone have any tips/ go through this same problem?
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 2
ol-zeke Search for posts by this member.
Clear Creek
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12384
Joined: Sep. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2012, 12:46 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The faintness and nausea made me think of Migraines, so I looked it up.  Seems a possibility, but also just heat related.  Wet bandana on your head, or a cooling shower at home might be the ticket.

http://www.ehow.com/how_2336889_cure-sunexposure-headache.html


--------------
Everything I know, I learned by doing it wrong at least twice.

"I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth."  Steve McQueen
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 3
big_load Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 23576
Joined: Jun. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2012, 1:13 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Bright sunlight is one of my migraine triggers, which might be a handicap since I spend so much time in the desert.  Fortunately, I long ago found the right combination of behaviors to avoid headaches.  For me, that includes always wearing sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat, but perhaps more important is maintaining regular exercise, close attention to hydration, electrolyte, and caffeine levels, and eating at regular intervals.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 4
SupportTheALF Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Guests
Posts: 70
Joined: Jul. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2012, 4:17 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My wife experiences the same problem, but has yet to find a solution.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 5
Mudinyeri Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 782
Joined: Sep. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2012, 2:13 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm curious what you consider "hydrated", KestrelL.  Few people really understand hydration - and its link to electrolytes.  I'm not saying you're one of those people, but I'm curious.  When someone mentions headaches, heat and sunshine ... my first thought turns to hydration.

--------------
"History is strewn with the wrecks of nations which have gained a little progressiveness at the cost of a great deal of hard manliness, and have thus prepared themselves for destruction as soon as the movements of the world gave a chance for it. "  Walter Bagehot, Founder of the National Review
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 6
LostSheep Search for posts by this member.
Most Awesomest Member
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 7970
Joined: Feb. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2012, 3:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My first assumption is hydration. You probably need to focus on water & electrolyte replacement. Alternate bottles of water with bottles of sports drink. That's my guess.

I do know that when I do extensive yardwork on hot days I can get headaches that will last days, and usually the first day is the worst. It's just a matter of pacing yourself, staying hydrated, and listening to your body.

I'd recommend slowing down with stops at times to ensure you drink more and don't get too dehydrated


--------------
Team Red, White & Blue’s vision is to transform the way wounded veterans are reintegrated into society when they return from combat and exit the Armed Services.

IT'S OUR TURN. Ask me how you can help.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 7
wildlifenate Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5856
Joined: Jul. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2012, 4:11 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

similar symptoms are what got me to start carrying an electrolyte beverage on hot summer hikes.  I would get throbbing headaches and I'd have been drinking plenty of water.  but my electrolytes were off.  even a little bit of an electrolyte drink keeps the headaches at bay.

I also find that when I have enough electrolytes in my system, I drink less water.


--------------
The GPS Geek
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 8
Gargs454 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 113
Joined: Jul. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2012, 5:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well, the first, and obvious advice would be to check with your doctor since there are any number of potential causes.

That being said, as others have mentioned, the electrolytes could be an issue.  Drinking water is essential, but you also need to keep up your electrolytes (sodium, potassium, etc.).  Try to bring a salty snack or a sports drink with a decent amount of these electrolytes (there are a couple other threads dealing with electrolytes here already).

Another possibility (and why it may be worth it to check with your doctor) is any number of potential medical issues.  My wife, for instance, has lupus and one of her main symptoms is "flare ups" when she's either stressed, exhausted, or out in the sun for too long.  In general, hiking hasn't been an issue for her yet (we mostly do short day hikes so far) but she still needs to rest afterward.  This past weekend she didn't get the chance to nap afterward and she ended up with a flare up and suffering many of the same symptoms you describe.  The good news here is that its manageable, the bad news is that there isn't really any sure fire test for lupus.  To manage it she just uses lots of sun block, sticks to the more shaded trails, and watches how hot it gets.  High heat and humidity will do here in almost every time.

Hopefully its just an electrolyte issue though.  :)
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 9
KestrelL Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 59
Joined: Jun. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2012, 8:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hmmm, I haven't really paid attention to electrolytes before (instead just making certain that I was drinking an appropriate amount of water).  That could be why I do feel much better after eating.  I don't like Gatorade so I've never had that to drink when I'm feeling crappy.

I usually have mini clif bars with me as they work the best for that.

I'll have to check out some of the other threads and see if any of those suggestions help.  I really they do!  

I probably should go see a doctor anyway.  One of my diabetic friends has similar issues - her blood sugar plummets when she's out in the sun too much.  I've got a history of diabetes in my family so that's a bit troublesome even if as an individual I'm not particularly at high risk.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 10
JimInMD Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3766
Joined: Feb. 2011
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2012, 10:11 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

See your doctor soon, especially with that family history.  Here in DC we treat a lot of tourists for similiar complaints and it's somewhere along the heat exhaustion/ heat stroke spectrum.  I'm a police Sergeant.  When one of my officers has been out in it for too long in a dark blue uniform and body armor, the severe headaches and dizzyness are usually the first complaints.  We get them cooled down, get the armor off of them and have them checked out because taking this diagnosis too lightly can lead to serious injuries or even death.

--------------
You rush a miracle man, you get rotten miracles.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 11
Gargs454 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 113
Joined: Jul. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2012, 10:26 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

By the way KestrelL, its probably related to electrolytes but I was just wanted to stress the importance of seeing a doctor to be sure (didn't mean to scare ya).  

@JiminMD yeah heat could do it too.  My one bout of heat stroke resulted in a headache too, though that was mostly because I passed out and hit a concrete wall on the way down.   :p
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 12
Mudinyeri Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 782
Joined: Sep. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2012, 12:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

By all means, see your physician.

We still don't know what you consider an appropriate amount of water.  That makes is difficult to assess your scenario from behind our computer screens.  :D

During strenuous activity in warm/hot temperatures, I try to bolster my electrolytes on an hourly basis.  Like you, I don't care for Gatorade - too sugary.  I do like a couple products from Hammer nutrition, though.


--------------
"History is strewn with the wrecks of nations which have gained a little progressiveness at the cost of a great deal of hard manliness, and have thus prepared themselves for destruction as soon as the movements of the world gave a chance for it. "  Walter Bagehot, Founder of the National Review
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 13
KestrelL Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 59
Joined: Jun. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2012, 4:34 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ah, sorry, thought I mentioned.  For everyday (aka, sitting in an office) I fill up my 1L water bottle.  That usually lasts me until about 2pm at which I fill up the water bottle again but usually only get halfway through.  At night I have maybe .5L after dinner, before going to bed.

This of course doesn't include other drinks like milk and the occasional pop.

When I'm doing physical activity I usually try to drink a large glass of water (maybe .5L) before engaging in the activity and then during I usually will drink about .75 L for every hour of activity, depending on intensity.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 14
Mudinyeri Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 782
Joined: Sep. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2012, 8:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That helps.  Here are a few thoughts.

1. Soda (pop) doesn't hydrate like water.  In fact, many sodas are diuretics that contribute to dehydration.  Coffee (although you didn't mention it) - same thing.

2. It doesn't sound like you're doing much pre-hydration before physical activity in hot weather.  Generally, I try to consume at least 2 liters of water prior to heavy exertion in hot weather.  Then, I try to consume about a liter an hour while hiking, running, biking, etc.

3. Remember to keep your electrolytes in balance while you're hydrating.  Too much water, without eating the right foods or taking electrolyte supplements can lead to "water poisoning".


--------------
"History is strewn with the wrecks of nations which have gained a little progressiveness at the cost of a great deal of hard manliness, and have thus prepared themselves for destruction as soon as the movements of the world gave a chance for it. "  Walter Bagehot, Founder of the National Review
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 15
KestrelL Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 59
Joined: Jun. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2012, 12:08 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Mudinyeri @ Jul. 31 2012, 8:56 pm)
QUOTE
That helps.  Here are a few thoughts.

1. Soda (pop) doesn't hydrate like water.  In fact, many sodas are diuretics that contribute to dehydration.  Coffee (although you didn't mention it) - same thing.

2. It doesn't sound like you're doing much pre-hydration before physical activity in hot weather.  Generally, I try to consume at least 2 liters of water prior to heavy exertion in hot weather.  Then, I try to consume about a liter an hour while hiking, running, biking, etc.

3. Remember to keep your electrolytes in balance while you're hydrating.  Too much water, without eating the right foods or taking electrolyte supplements can lead to "water poisoning".

How big is your bladder?!  ;)  I think I'd be running to the bathroom every 5 minutes.

But you're probably right in that I don't do enough 'pre-hydration'.  Oh, and I do know that pop/sugary drinks/coffee can be detrimental to hydration.  

Ok, another question.  I just don't sweat that much.  Can you still lose electrolytes if you're not really sweating that much?  (I'm basing that I don't sweat much on the fact that my sweat doesn't ever drip, even when it's really freaking hot.)
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 16
Three Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1029
Joined: Dec. 2011
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2012, 12:14 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(big_load @ Jul. 30 2012, 1:13 am)
QUOTE
Bright sunlight is one of my migraine triggers, which might be a handicap since I spend so much time in the desert.  Fortunately, I long ago found the right combination of behaviors to avoid headaches.  For me, that includes always wearing sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat, but perhaps more important is maintaining regular exercise, close attention to hydration, electrolyte, and caffeine levels, and eating at regular intervals.

This is close to my experience.  Migraine solution equals a nap.   A quart of Gatorade seems to be a big help for me also.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 17
Mudinyeri Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 782
Joined: Sep. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2012, 2:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(KestrelL @ Aug. 01 2012, 12:08 am)
QUOTE
How big is your bladder?!  ;)  I think I'd be running to the bathroom every 5 minutes.

But you're probably right in that I don't do enough 'pre-hydration'.  Oh, and I do know that pop/sugary drinks/coffee can be detrimental to hydration.  

Ok, another question.  I just don't sweat that much.  Can you still lose electrolytes if you're not really sweating that much?  (I'm basing that I don't sweat much on the fact that my sweat doesn't ever drip, even when it's really freaking hot.)

Umm ....  I'll leave the specifics of my bladder size out of this discussion but suggest that urination is a good thing.  :D

Electrolyte loss is generally closely tied to the amount of sweat one perspires.  However, you may be sweating less because you're not adequately hydrated.

Vicious cycle.

You could try an experiment.  

Hydrate as you do now.  Take a one hour walk in warm, sunny conditions with a small plastic baggy taped to your lower back (just above the waistline) to collect your sweat.  Emtpy baggy into liquid measuing cup and note the amount.

Repeat the test after (pre)hydrating as I suggested.

Make sure your lower back is dry before you attach the baggy.  Use a non-absorbent tape to attach the baggy.

If you wait until you're thirsty to drink, you're already partially dehydrated.  If you're not peeing every hour, you're partially dehydrated.


--------------
"History is strewn with the wrecks of nations which have gained a little progressiveness at the cost of a great deal of hard manliness, and have thus prepared themselves for destruction as soon as the movements of the world gave a chance for it. "  Walter Bagehot, Founder of the National Review
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 18
KestrelL Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 59
Joined: Jun. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 07 2012, 11:27 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well, I've got an appointment with a doctor at the end of the month.  Hopefully they'll be able to tell me something.  Until then, I'll try the electrolyte replacements and hopefully that will reduce some issues.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 19
TigerFan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2614
Joined: May 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 07 2012, 3:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Before you go off worrying about how much you sweat, keep in mind that women sweat significantly less than men.  I think one theory is that men are designed to be able to work harder while women are designed to conserve fluids.  Different priorities.

Also, the amount of sweat isn't just about how hydrated you are.  Physically fit men sweat the most.  Not necessarily because they're the most hydrated, but probably because their bodies are better trained to maintain optimal body temperature under stress.   Athletic women will also sweat more than non-athletic women; again, because their bodies have learned to sweat in order to maintain their core temps.

FWIW, I'm a 5' 2" woman and I *average* about 1.25 gallons per day of water consumption when I'm hiking.  That's for everything, including drinking water, morning juice/coffee, water used to rehydrate meals, etc.  (You hike in the dessert enough, you know exactly how much water you use...)  I don't sweat much either.


--------------
Duct tape is like the Force.  It has a light side, a dark side, and it holds the universe together.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 20
big_load Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 23576
Joined: Jun. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 07 2012, 3:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(KestrelL @ Aug. 07 2012, 11:27 am)
QUOTE
Hopefully they'll be able to tell me something.

Be prepared for a lot more questions than answers.   If you do get what seems like a simple, straightforward answer, it's going to be just a guess.  Maybe a good guess, but a guess just the same.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 21
SPeacock Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2052
Joined: May 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 07 2012, 6:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm sure the doc will check your veins (deoxygenated blood) and arterial (from the heart oxygenated) pressures under stress.  In the worse case, carotid and jugular are at times affected by increased stress induced by external reactions (extreme apprehension) and to over stressing the total system by, for example large muscles under very heavy load that is abruptly stopped. The blood pressure drops...and the damsel in distress (in the movies) swoons.

Check out 'swooning'... hypotension induced blackouts which is by far the higher chance of things that you might have. But this is not as exciting as having something actually wrong.

A quick check by your physician is to listen to blood in your arteries with a stethoscope to see if the plumbing seems to be in order.

He will figure out if what you are feeling is the result of a constriction or induced obstruction of blood to the brain casing a temporary (10 secs or so) buzzing or whooshing sound, perhaps nausea and partial loss of consciousness. You can cause this affect by putting pressure on your jugulars (actually the carotids) with your finger tips.  Those arteries and veins run on either side of your windpipe.

If this is what you perceive as your problem, be sure to bring it up with your doc (duh!).  If this has been a common occurrence, I'd guess you will safely make it to the end of the month.

There are cases where a bright flash or loud unexpected noise will cause the affect in susceptible people.


--------------
Experience as well as wisdom, at times, is foolishly acquired.
To understand why details matter, you first need to notice them.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 22
KestrelL Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 59
Joined: Jun. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 08 2012, 12:37 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(big_load @ Aug. 07 2012, 3:54 pm)
QUOTE

(KestrelL @ Aug. 07 2012, 11:27 am)
QUOTE
Hopefully they'll be able to tell me something.

Be prepared for a lot more questions than answers.   If you do get what seems like a simple, straightforward answer, it's going to be just a guess.  Maybe a good guess, but a guess just the same.

Yeah, I'm under no illusion that something can be completely diagnosed in one doctor visit.  But if something's actually seriously wrong (which I kind of doubt) they at least have an opportunity to catch it then.

I guess what I'm most worried about is that this is an indication of diabetes or something like that.  There's also a possibility that I have PCOS (I'm going to see a gyno about this soon) as I have cysts on my ovaries and many of the other symptoms.  PCOS is often categorized with some insulin resistance.

This has been happening fairly regularly for at least the past 5 years.  I guess it's just time that I get some professional input.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 23
Serpicorabbit Search for posts by this member.
If I pee on it, it's mine!
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 4114
Joined: Oct. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 25 2012, 3:28 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(KestrelL @ Jul. 29 2012, 8:11 pm)
QUOTE
I've had problems with being in the sun and/or doing physical activity since about middle school (I'm currently 22).  I was wondering if anyone else had any of these symptoms and if they do, how they manage them, particularly when backpacking.

If it's hot and I'm out in the sun, even with a hat and sunglasses on, I'll feel nauseous and dizzy and often I'll have to sit down suddenly or I feel like I'll faint.  I feel like I have to eat something or I'll pass out.  Eating food usually helps with most of the nausea.

I feel ya.  I can't drink beer while I'm playing disc golf on a hot, sunny San Diego day without getting a bad headache.  It's a real bitch since disc golf is the perfect sport for putting a few away, course temperance enforcement being so lax and all.  I love my beer, but I hate headaches, so I'm willing to save my swill for the 19th hole.


--------------
No problem! ~ ALF
--------------
Serpicorabbit's blog
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 24
SnidelyWhiplash Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 522
Joined: Jul. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 08 2012, 12:08 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi, I know I'm really late on this but I have the same problem.  I drink about 1L every three hours hiking and take salt pills w/potassium, problem solved.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 25
SPeacock Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2052
Joined: May 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 09 2012, 9:34 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Kestrell,

And the diagnosis (or possible problem) from the doc was?


--------------
Experience as well as wisdom, at times, is foolishly acquired.
To understand why details matter, you first need to notice them.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 26
TIMOTEO Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 444
Joined: Jun. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 23 2012, 2:32 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yeah, I get headaches & nausea in the heat and with exertion... A hot shower helps sometimes, the heat, or the steam? Also, when I fall asleep they go away. An aspirin pill may help take it away.

--------------
Babies be born, Environment won, Mercy to all, and Morals be strong.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 27
wildlifenate Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5856
Joined: Jul. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 23 2012, 8:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I got one today on my 16mi mountain bike ride.  In addition to the water I drank while riding, it took 2 liters of nuun before it went away.

--------------
The GPS Geek
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
26 replies since Jul. 29 2012, 11:11 pm < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


 
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply Headaches caused by sun/physical exertion
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code



Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions