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Topic: Getting In Shape for a long hike< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2012, 10:06 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I am a novice in every sense of the word. I have planned a 165 mile thru hike on the Ozark Highlands Trail in about 10 months. I have done a little back packing, a few 8-10 mile overnight trips. I am in better shape than I was when I did those hikes but I need to get in optimal shape. Anybody got a good regimen or any tips for getting trail ready? I know I need to do some smaller hikes in between now and then. I would like to do a couple miles as often as possible with some weight on my back. Anybody know of a good way to simulate the weight of a pack without actually having a pack. Would just throwing 25 or so pounds worth of books in a regular back pack suffice? Any tips you have would be appreciated.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2012, 11:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RyLo83 @ Jul. 31 2012, 10:06 pm)
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I am a novice in every sense of the word. I have planned a 165 mile thru hike on the Ozark Highlands Trail in about 10 months. I have done a little back packing, a few 8-10 mile overnight trips. I am in better shape than I was when I did those hikes but I need to get in optimal shape. Anybody got a good regimen or any tips for getting trail ready? I know I need to do some smaller hikes in between now and then. I would like to do a couple miles as often as possible with some weight on my back. Anybody know of a good way to simulate the weight of a pack without actually having a pack. Would just throwing 25 or so pounds worth of books in a regular back pack suffice? Any tips you have would be appreciated.

Do you have a regular workout routine now of any sort -running, cycling, walking etc?
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2012, 11:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A regular backpack would be better than nothing, but a real pack would be best.

Do you not have a real pack?  If not, you better jump on it!


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I'm a 24yr male who hikes, sails, freedives and woodworks. Have been hiking 3 years now mostly solo.!

I have a Youtube Channel too, SailingandSuch!  Check it out!  
http://www.youtube.com/user/SailingandSuch?feature=mhee
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2012, 11:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Three- I did have a pretty regular workout routine but it didnt involve any road work. I am beginning to run. And between now and my planned hike I am scheduled to run a half marathon. So, if all goes as planned, I should be in half marathon shape when I do the hike.

Sailer- I will have a pack soon but not all my gear yet. Should I just throw some junk in there to get it up to weight. and what would be a good target weight? 25 lbs?

Also, in addition to good ol road and trail work what else should I work on? Maybe back strengthening? Yall will have to forgive me for all the questions. I am just now getting into an active lifestyle after 4 years of college which wrecked me. I am not content being a couch potato anymore.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2012, 11:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RyLo83 @ Jul. 31 2012, 11:27 pm)
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Three- I did have a pretty regular workout routine but it didnt involve any road work. I am beginning to run. And between now and my planned hike I am scheduled to run a half marathon. So, if all goes as planned, I should be in half marathon shape when I do the hike.

Sailer- I will have a pack soon but not all my gear yet. Should I just throw some junk in there to get it up to weight. and what would be a good target weight? 25 lbs?

Also, in addition to good ol road and trail work what else should I work on? Maybe back strengthening? Yall will have to forgive me for all the questions. I am just now getting into an active lifestyle after 4 years of college which wrecked me. I am not content being a couch potato anymore.

I just got back from Glacier where we did 4-10 miles a day for 5 days at the relatively lower elevations.

I had run short distances - 2 miles or so three times a week, sometimes alternated with cycling about 15 miles.
Also did light weights, kettlebells or situps and pushups a couple times a week

Did a couple of short hikes with gear, more to see how the gear would ride than for conditioning.

Although the thought came to me on two occassions that my pack was really heavy ( it really wasn't - probably about 35-40 pounds), I think I would have put more time into aerobic conditioning, probably running if I had to do it again.  And even having said that, the only realy problem was the teenage athlete who wanted to set a very fast pace.

Unless you are of very slight upper body build or are going to carry a pack in excess of 40-45 pounds, I don't think you need to worry about numerous hike with the weight of a pack.  Maybe a couple but training for a half marathon I think would put you in good stead.  

I will defer to more experienced backpackers though on this.  I do know Backpacker magazine does list exercises to get in shape.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2012, 9:38 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Training for the half marathon should get you in plenty good shape for the endurance portion of your trip.  The question remains though as to the strength conditioning.

Personally, I think you will want to do some short hikes at full or close to full weight if for no other reason than to test out the pack with that amount of weight.  Different packs will, from what I am reading (keep in mind I'm a newbie too) wear slightly differently on different people at different weights.  

Given the length of your trip, I would certainly recommend making sure that your back is in shape.  There are a number of fairly simple back strengthening exercises you can do to help with this.  Only you can really know how good of shape your back is in.  For me, I'm definitely doing the exercises now as the wife and I are slowly expanding our hikes (even though we are not going with much weight) but I also have a chronic back injury (fairly minor) from my days as a high school athlete (though athlete's a relative term  :p )

One thing I would caution you on about the pack though is that you probably want to buy the rest of the gear before you buy the pack.  This way you can make sure that a) the gear fits in your pack and b) the pack wears well with all the gear.  Take your gear with you to the store when you go to buy the pack and load it up.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2012, 2:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A. Hiking/walking is different than running.  Although, running will improve your overall fitness level, you will be utilizing a different gait and different sets of muscles to hike with a pack.

B. Get a pack ... yesterday.  Find a comfortable pack (this could take some time) and start logging some miles with it.  Start with just the pack and gradually increase the weight as you purchase gear.  You might consider adding some "soft" weight in advance of purchasing gear if your budget constrains you from purchasing gear at the rate at which you need to increase your weight.

C. Get your gear ... yesterday.  You need to make sure your gear works and get used to how it works.

D. Put together a plan to hike with your pack every other day during the week adding longer hikes on weekends.  There are number of marathon training regimines available on the internet.  You could base your pack/hike work on one of these adding weight each week.

E. You need less gear than you think.


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2012, 4:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ok, as for workouts I would go with some cardio like running, biking, swimming, ect.  But like others said yo need strength too, leg and back strength.  

I like body weight exercises like pushups PULLUPS! situps.  Also, some exercises to focus on backpacking related muscles do a lot fo squats and lunges.  

Start them without weights and then add dumbells in your hands for added difficulty.  Do alternating lunges (15 on each leg for a set, a total of 30 lunges per set).  Do squats starting with your arms straight out in front of you and then at your side or over your head with dumbells (20 per set)  Adding the weights will simulate some weight on your back.  

Focus on doing all of your exercises slow and in proper form (google them for proper form if you need too).  This is very important.  SLOW lunges SLOW Squats SLOW pushups.  

Getting those legs strong for long uphills will help you a lot.  

Strength training combined with cardio is your best bet and it can all be done without buying much expensive workout equipment.

Also remember a light load is much easier than a heavy one, not just your pack but your body!  If you need to loose some pounds, don't try to do it with exercise, that's way to hard. The key to loosing weight is DIET, but it you can't treat it like a diet, you need to treat it like a lifestyle. Diets are something you quit when your happy, when you quit a diet the weight comes back.

Now, as for gear lol

Unlike what everyone says, I bought my pack first pretty much.  I bought a smaller pack 35 liters, because I knew I wanted a light pack so I bought the small pack which forced me to not be able to bring much and the stuff I had to buy neeeded to be light and small.

Figure your food out.  Will you resupply?  Carry it all at the start?  Go to Youtube and look at backpacking meals, you can get some awsome lighweight stuff from Walmart!  Go buy some and try it at home and find something you like.  Then buy a good bit of it (you need to vary your meals so they don't get old to you) and see how much room it takes up and if you can possibly fit it all in your pack or do you need to plan to resupply.

You can figure about 2lbs of food per day.  

Goodness...... I can get long winded.......  I need to right on this stuff down on a website or something lol


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I'm a 24yr male who hikes, sails, freedives and woodworks. Have been hiking 3 years now mostly solo.!

I have a Youtube Channel too, SailingandSuch!  Check it out!  
http://www.youtube.com/user/SailingandSuch?feature=mhee
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2012, 10:07 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I appreciate all the input and advice! I am going to take it all into consideration and put together a plan for myself. I might post it and let yall critique it or whatever. Thanks again!
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2012, 10:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I might also be asking advice on gear and all of that. As for the pack, what should I look at as far as fit? I have done a few hikes with a Kelty Big Bend 5000 and I did not really notice any problems or discomfort other than just not being used to the weight.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2012, 10:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Oh yea, my experience on pack fit......

People say you should try it on in the store with weight in it.  Well, I didn't do that and I find that my pack is not uncomfortable at all!  Although I may be getting a new pack soon to loose some weight, I love my Mountain Hardwear Trad pack (new model is now the pretty much identical Via Rapida 35).  Maybe I just got lucky with a pack that fits me perfectly....... maybe.

I have tried on a few of my friends packs with weight in them and I haven't noticed any specific uncomfortable thing about any of them.  Once you learn to pack your pack correctly and adjust the straps correctly they seem to be fine.

That KBB is a huge pack!  Go for something smaller if you want lighweight.  It seems to me the larger the pack the more crap you will find that you think you need to put in it.  This is why I went with a smaller pack.

I'm looking to sell my pack as a matter of fact if you think you may be interested let me know.  It's in fabulous condition.

I have a gearlist video on Youtube if you want to check it out.  It shows my pack and all and could be pretty helpful to you.  You can just click the link below in my signature to get to my channel, then click "Videos" to see them all and find the gear one.


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I'm a 24yr male who hikes, sails, freedives and woodworks. Have been hiking 3 years now mostly solo.!

I have a Youtube Channel too, SailingandSuch!  Check it out!  
http://www.youtube.com/user/SailingandSuch?feature=mhee
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2012, 10:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yeah, whenever I got it I had no idea what I was doing. I wasnt thinking light weight, I was thinking I need a ton of room to carry a ton of stuff, which is stupid looking back on it. I was planning on selling it and getting something else. Ill for sure check out your pack and let you know.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2012, 10:59 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hey man, I checked out your video. I am definitely interested in the pack. Also, I was relieved you had a little walmart gear in there. It let me know we were on the same page. Do you like the alcohol stove pretty well? I was toying with making one. I have an old primus stove that is really small but the fuel bottles is what puts on the weight. Another thing I considered was sleeping in a hammock that way I can leave the sleeping pad at home. And for this specific trip I would probably leave the sleeping bag out and go with a liner. June in Arkansas is consistently warm and I sleep cold anyway.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2012, 11:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Cool!  Glad to hear that!  Not sure the price I want to put on it.  Maybe $140 or so?  Not sure, I'll have to see what packs usually go for lightly used.  Yes!  Walmart gear is your friend at first.  My dry sacks are great but that camel back thing's cap has a crack in it and I'm buying a real Camelbak brand water reservoir.

I do like the stove, a lot.  It's super simple, super light and really really easy to make.  You can find it on Youtube, cat can stove.  

I have recently been pondering the hammock idea, but I haven't given in to it yet, I still don't see any real advantages that would convert me.
-you have to be around trees
-you have to carry a tarp, the hammock, underquilt and sleeping bag (my tent is cheaper than a hammock and tarp and underquilt, even just the tarp and hammock are more)

I even have a Eno hammock but I haven't used it yet.  Right now I'm thinking about getting a poncho/tarp to use as my raingear/shelter/packcover.  That would save me almost 2lbs or more and would be good for the winter time.  Bivy's are a little costly though.

If your still interested in the pack just let me know and I can send you pics/video of it if you'd like.


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I'm a 24yr male who hikes, sails, freedives and woodworks. Have been hiking 3 years now mostly solo.!

I have a Youtube Channel too, SailingandSuch!  Check it out!  
http://www.youtube.com/user/SailingandSuch?feature=mhee
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 02 2012, 12:06 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Since you're going to be carrying a big pack, you'll want to work on your musculature. If you want to develop your abs, I highly recommend "The Truth About Six Pack Abs," the program I've used to tone up my stomach and start developing my abdominals. It also has a foolproof method to keep you going back to the gym until you've achieved your workout goals. You can check out my review of "Six Pack Abs" if you want more info.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 02 2012, 12:22 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Sailer- Yeah, I am still considering the hammock thing. Another question I have is what about clothing? How much should I carry? All the trips I have done were just one nighters so I didnt carry any extra clothing except socks. Any tips?

MattFR- I appreciate the advice. Ill definitely check out the program.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 02 2012, 2:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Most of the muscles you will be using are below your belly button.  If you can get into a weight lifting program through a gym (for less than $1 a day no initiation fee) you will be way ahead of the game.  You can get help from others working out, or better, get a staff member to show you a set of routines and then just check in every few weeks to see how you are doing and add more options.

Seated and prone leg lifts and presses, calf raises are most efficiently done with equipment that you can change the work out patterns on.  

Your core muscles keep you upright with a pack on.  Every other day lower back and abdominal groups work outs will keep you from having back problems.

Back: Lay face down, raise out stretched right arm and left leg and hold for two breaths, then raise left arm/right leg.  Repeat 10 times with 3 repetitions.  Increase the length of time and number of repeats.

Abs: lay on back knees bent feet on floor, hold your fingers as if a cage around your ears and raise your shoulders off the floor.  20 reps  3 sets. Increase reps not sets. If too easy lift legs off ground and cross them.

You don't want to over train either the back or front muscles more than the other (don't just do abs).  You will increase the risk of a back injury as one set or muscles overpowers the other or compensates for those other muscles being weaker.  You have to spend the time on them.

These are a great warm up activity to prepare you for larger muscle exercise.  Make sure your body is prepared for the work out with a 10 min warm up that could include anything that is repetitive and not stressful - like stair climbers or tread mill.  You are warmed up when you have a slight glisten of sweat.

75% on lower muscles 5% on core (they will also be used on most of the other exercises anyway) and 20% on upper body large muscles.  

http://exrx.net/  is a great resource for what to do and how to do it.

http://www.alpineascents.com/denali-train.asp even though you are not doing anything near as ambitious, they have a good fitness plan for anything you want to do.

Even though it would seem counter intuitive, walking with a loaded pack is not an efficient way to fitness.  Unless you are going on the hike anyway, just walking to carry a pack can much better be addressed with proper weight lifting in a fraction of the time and be less injury prone.  But if you insist, 20 pound kitty litter bags make up a lot of gallon sized Ziplock plastic bags - double bagged. Each weigh about 5 lbs. Put a 20 pound bag well cinched tight in bottom and add the bags on top.  It will help you check out the fit of a weighted prospective bag in the store too.
s
Two walking exercises are good for all the other muscles around your hips and knees.  Walk in a straight line and place the left foot as far to the right as you can, then move the right foot forward placing it as far to the left as you can.  The other is moving your right foot forward almost clipping the left foot and placing it as far to the right as you can plant it (still going straight), then move the left up forward grazing the right foot and placing it as far to the left as you can. Trails are not even or rock free like a running track or treadmill is.

Being aerobically fit (running, doing stairs) is only part of the equation.

Training your upper body muscles to use trek poles is another special event for backpackers.  Putting only 20 pounds of weight on alternate poles for each stride can transfer around 40,000 pounds a mile from your feet to the poles.  You can not do that amount of effort without some training.

If on uphill a lot, learn the step/breath method.  You inhale on one foot placement and exhale on the other.  The idea is to maintain your heart rate (hence your respiration rate) constant.  You take shorter steps when steep up and longer when flat or gentle down.  Start the breathing and stepping at least 20 seconds before you hit an unhill.  You don't want to start out oxygen deprived.

Ask the guy at the gym (or research the net) on best nutrition for building muscle and supporting stamina.  Usually higher protein, less carbohydrates and lower fats.  If supporting an aggressive work out program you will be eating a considerable amount of food that should be consumed in 6 equal meals spread out over your waking period.  

Plan on a LOT more water to keep the chemistry going.

For a general book that includes much more than mountaineering and can save you the cost of the book on equipment alone:

The Mountaineering Handbook, Craig Connally

Its a good companion read to Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills.

Both are applicable to just a good long back pack in the Ozarks too :)


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To understand why details matter, you first need to notice them.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 03 2012, 12:23 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Nice post Peacock!

Clothes?  Depends on the weather of course but also on personal preference.  Me personally I have always carried 2 sets of day hiking clothes (shorts and sleeveless shirt) and I wash one every morning and hang it on my pack to dry during the day.  

When the weather is cool I have a pair of pants to wear and a long sleeve shirt also. I wear both of these over my shorts/shirt as not to get them sweaty or dirty from my body.

When it's real cold, I have a pair of synthetic long johns that I wear at night and maybe in the mornings if its really chilly out.  

I enjoy clean clothes and a clean body at night.  I typically wash my hair and face in the mornings in a creek and then everything with my camp towel in the evenings.


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I'm a 24yr male who hikes, sails, freedives and woodworks. Have been hiking 3 years now mostly solo.!

I have a Youtube Channel too, SailingandSuch!  Check it out!  
http://www.youtube.com/user/SailingandSuch?feature=mhee
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 03 2012, 4:12 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I hope you're not really washing in a creek.  People get water from those.

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 03 2012, 6:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

So how big of a pack would be good? this will probably be a two week hike but we will be carrying on a few days of food at a time and resupplying at trail heads and towns along the way. 3000-4000 ci?
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 03 2012, 9:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You are in luck.  Backpacker just published this

http://www.backpacker.com/expert-....etter03

For size of and brand names of a backpack and how much you think you will be carrying (weight/bulk), best answers are in the GEAR Forum.  Do a search (this site has a fairly good one) to see if the same question hasn't been answered already (It has).


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 03 2012, 9:20 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks SPeacock!
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(Talus. @ Aug. 03 2012, 4:12 pm)
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I hope you're not really washing in a creek.  People get water from those.

Wildlife s**t in the creek so I'm not overly concerned with someone washing up in the creek.  That's why I carry a purifier. :p
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(Three @ Jul. 31 2012, 11:01 pm)
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(RyLo83 @ Jul. 31 2012, 10:06 pm)
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I am a novice in every sense of the word. I have planned a 165 mile thru hike on the Ozark Highlands Trail in about 10 months. I have done a little back packing, a few 8-10 mile overnight trips. I am in better shape than I was when I did those hikes but I need to get in optimal shape. Anybody got a good regimen or any tips for getting trail ready? I know I need to do some smaller hikes in between now and then. I would like to do a couple miles as often as possible with some weight on my back. Anybody know of a good way to simulate the weight of a pack without actually having a pack. Would just throwing 25 or so pounds worth of books in a regular back pack suffice? Any tips you have would be appreciated.

Do you have a regular workout routine now of any sort -running, cycling, walking etc?

If you want to simulate hiking, throwing some weight in a backpacking and hiking up and down a flight of stairs like you suggested is a great workout. I put 45lbs in my pack and go for 45 minutes, only stopping for a sip of water 3 times or so. Great workout. In the week before I leave for a trip, I often skip my regular weight training regiment and replace it with daily stair climbs to get my legs used to the daily punishment they will be receiving. I might also do a few pullups, situps, pushups etc before I do the stair climbs though, just so that I am not completely ignoring those muscles for that week.

I try to step up my leg workouts in the months before a trip, doing more squats, calves, deadlifts, etc as well as running 3x per week if possible. I also concentrate on stretching EVERY TIME I work out, whether it be running, legs, chest, arms, whatever... just stretch every time you workout to get yourself as limber as possible before the trip.

Enjoy your tip, and don't forget to post a trip report when you get back! I'd love to go to the Ozarks someday.


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 23 2012, 11:05 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Just thought I'd toss in here that this spring and summer, due to some Achilles problems that cut into his running, my spouse did a lot of training with a loaded pack (up into the top weight he carries on the trail).  He used water for a lot of the weight; it doesn't carry super well but allowed him to dump weight as needed (like coming down steep trails, where he didn't want the stress on his knees).  This proved very effective for him, and even though he was aerobically less fit than usual, he felt better backpacking.

Now, if the OP just finished college, you're less than half the DH's age, but I'm thinking it still holds.  It takes more time to get fit by hiking with a load, but there's no denying it works out exactly the muscles you'll be using on the trail!

As for gear and clothing: keep it light, keep it to a minimum (I wear convertible pants and a long-sleeve sun shirt every day, rinse when I can, and change to long underwear tops and bottoms in camp.  The only things I carry multiples of are sox and underwear, usually two each, three if drying times will be long).

Food should hit between 1.5 and 2 lbs per day, depending on your appetite and how hard you work on making it light stuff.  Drop over to the food forum for good ideas.

I'm an averaged sized female, and I carry a little more than my share (because my kids still carry a little less than their share) for a week in a 60 liter pack.  It took a while to get down to that, though.

Hope this helps, and have fun!


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 23 2012, 2:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(SupportTheALF @ Aug. 06 2012, 3:37 am)
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(Talus. @ Aug. 03 2012, 4:12 pm)
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I hope you're not really washing in a creek.  People get water from those.

Wildlife s**t in the creek so I'm not overly concerned with someone washing up in the creek.  That's why I carry a purifier. :p

That's great until everyone starts doing it-dirt isn't the problem-soap, deet and any other non-natural stuff that is on people's bodies is.  Besides, isn't half the fun of backpacking working up a good stink?  :p

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 23 2012, 7:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

In a nutshell, no,I don't consider stink to be part of the fun. When I get clean I sleep better,and gear and clothes last longer.  We carry a collapsible bucket for clothes washing, and don't use soap anyway.  Ditto bathing ourselves--no soap, just a jump in the lake.  

Wipe off sunscreen or Deet before swimming.  For me, that means washing my face--I mostly sunscreen with clothing.


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 28 2012, 7:30 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Simply just thought I would toss in here until this spring along with summer, because of some Achilles issues that cut directly into his working, my loved one did plenty of training that has a loaded wrap up (up into the top fat he keeps on the trail). He employed water for many the fat; it won't carry tremendous well yet allowed him to eliminate weight since needed (like coming down steep paths, where this individual didn't want the strain on his / her knees). This proved really effective pertaining to him, and even though he seemed to be aerobically a smaller amount fit as compared to usual, this individual felt superior backpacking.

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 19 2012, 10:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

So many people gave such great advice, just letting you know that I appreciate everyone's input :)
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