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Topic: Cancer Reduction< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 07 2012, 7:08 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I found the recent publication "
Lifestyle Changes Could Prevent 50% of Common Cancers" interesting.  Cancer Reduction

It reminded me to continue to take that asprin a day and tell my doc no more PSA test.


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wildlifenate Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 07 2012, 8:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

can you at least post an abstract or citation?

I don't care to sign up for the site to read the article.

as for the title, I believe it.

my own cancer is a lifestyle cancer.  Unfortunately not my own lifestyle.  Secondhand smoke exposure growing up.


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 07 2012, 9:55 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Isn't all death attributable to lifestyle?
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 07 2012, 10:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Sorry about More than 50% of cancer could be prevented if people simply implemented what is already known about cancer prevention, according to a researcher here at the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) World Cancer Congress 2012.

Graham Colditz, PD, DrPH, from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, reported that a number of interventions, largely involving lifestyle behaviors, but also involving higher-cost interventions in high-income countries, could prevent a large proportion of cancers in 15 to 20 years if widely applied. Among the "biggest buys" from lifestyle intervention is smoking cessation. "

It goes on to talk about being overweight and obesity, poor diet and lack of exercise.   Vaccines including hepatitis B to decrease cancer.  Screening for colon cancer etc. Also more high tech methods including tamoxifen to reduce breast cancer, using genetic markers  to identify those at high risk for certain cancers and taking preemptive action  such as surgery in the case of markers for ovarian or breast cancer,


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“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” -Mark Twain
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 08 2012, 3:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

thanks, Roger

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 20 2012, 2:15 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I think it doesn't really matter, you either get it by chance or genitics. Menopausal medications can cause breast cancer, possibly, so try to avoid those. Talk to your doctor on the subject, they'd probably know better than me.

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 21 2012, 2:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(SpiderWave625 @ Sep. 20 2012, 1:15 am)
QUOTE
I think it doesn't really matter, you either get it by chance or genitics. Menopausal medications can cause breast cancer, possibly, so try to avoid those. Talk to your doctor on the subject, they'd probably know better than me.

yes, it's an odds game.  but different things can affect those odds.

due to my childhood exposure to secondhand smoke, my odds of developing AML went up to at least 1:2,000 (a conservative estimate).  those are insane odds when you're talking about cancer risk.  1:1,000,000 is deemed an unacceptably high risk by OSHA for workplace situations.  so draw your conclusions from there.

"chance" does not mean "random."


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 21 2012, 3:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'd like to think that keeping a lean body and staying away from animal fats makes a huge difference in your chances for cancer, but I'm going to do that anyway :p

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 21 2012, 5:26 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Talus. @ Sep. 21 2012, 2:43 pm)
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I'd like to think that keeping a lean body and staying away from animal fats makes a huge difference in your chances for cancer, but I'm going to do that anyway :p

"staying away from animal fats" I think is a bit too general.  some of them are good for you.  avoiding excessive quantities in general is good.  

it's becoming apparent that what the animals eat before you eat them makes a huge difference.

that is my takeaway message.  don't eat too much meat.  but what I do, make sure I'm eating the right stuff.


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 22 2012, 4:12 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yeah, I was being general out of pure laziness.  I don't really exclude much from my diet.  I do however severely limit certain things.  Everything in moderation.

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 22 2012, 5:21 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What the animals eat is important from a nutrient profile standpoint but also  important from a cancer prevention standpoint is how the food is prepared.Cooking meat and starches(think french fries and potato chips and the like) at high temperatures has been shown to create carcinogens and in the case the meat it is not even the saturated fat that is the culprit but creatine interacting with amino acids.So if you must cook a food it is best to do so at as low a temperature as possible and of course include as many fruits and vegetables as possible as they have been shown to contain cancer prevention agents.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 22 2012, 3:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(rwtb123 @ Sep. 22 2012, 4:21 am)
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What the animals eat is important from a nutrient profile standpoint but also  important from a cancer prevention standpoint is how the food is prepared.Cooking meat and starches(think french fries and potato chips and the like) at high temperatures has been shown to create carcinogens and in the case the meat it is not even the saturated fat that is the culprit but creatine interacting with amino acids.So if you must cook a food it is best to do so at as low a temperature as possible and of course include as many fruits and vegetables as possible as they have been shown to contain cancer prevention agents.

if that's not an endorsement of the "low and slow" bbq cooking method, I dunno what is.  :-)

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 03 2012, 10:13 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Roger @ Sep. 07 2012, 10:47 pm)
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... using genetic markers  to identify those at high risk for certain cancers and taking preemptive action  such as surgery in the case of markers for ovarian or breast cancer,

That seems extreme, and all too convenient to bias the prevention numbers. I guess if we all had our lungs removed, cases of lung cancer would dramatically decrease.

The other actions seem reasonable and obvious. But where is the line drawn between personal freedom and group health care coverage? With the government being more and more involved in healthcare, I see this as being a serious talking point in the future.


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 04 2012, 4:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(WalksWithBlackflies @ Oct. 03 2012, 10:13 am)
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That seems extreme, and all too convenient to bias the prevention numbers. I guess if we all had our lungs removed, cases of lung cancer would dramatically decrease.

I'd agree that it's pretty extreme, but in some cases prophylactic surgery becomes a much more reasonable option. Haven't seen the article, but I'm guessing it's referring to certain polymorphisms in BRCA1 - several of them can give you a >50% lifetime risk of breast or ovarian cancer.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 08 2012, 1:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(WalksWithBlackflies @ Oct. 03 2012, 10:13 am)
QUOTE

(Roger @ Sep. 07 2012, 10:47 pm)
QUOTE
... using genetic markers  to identify those at high risk for certain cancers and taking preemptive action  such as surgery in the case of markers for ovarian or breast cancer,

That seems extreme, and all too convenient to bias the prevention numbers. I guess if we all had our lungs removed, cases of lung cancer would dramatically decrease.

The other actions seem reasonable and obvious. But where is the line drawn between personal freedom and group health care coverage? With the government being more and more involved in healthcare, I see this as being a serious talking point in the future.

I doubt that preventive mastectomies or oophorectomies have a significant effect on prevention numbers - except among women at extreme risk for breast or ovarian cancers.

It's a high stakes game - though "game" isn't a great choice of words.

Kind of like Russian roulette with half or 1/3 of the chambers loaded. No thanks.


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 08 2012, 4:32 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(buddero @ Oct. 08 2012, 12:43 pm)
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except among women at extreme risk for breast or ovarian cancers.

and that's the crux of the genetic statements.  For most people, preventive surgeries aren't going to be helpful.  but there are some cancers that are KNOWN to have genes that increase cancer risk EXTREMELY high.  in those cases, such surgeries become a good idea.  I have friends who have the BRCA genes.  If preventive action is not taken, it can be almost a sure thing that you'll develop cancer, and once you get the cancer once, you'll be fighting it on and off for most of the rest of your life.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 11 2012, 11:23 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I always ate a fairly routine American diet, but not a lot of snack foods. Made sure I had several servings of veggies or fruits a day, and while no vegetarian, did not eat meat every day.
I was discussing eating with my oncologist a couple of visits ago, and he said that lots of veggies, along with fiber reduces the chance of many cancers, but sometimes it just comes and gets you. He mentioned that two of his current patients had been vegans for many years before they got cancer, and were stunned at their diagnosis. Both believed that their diets made them cancer-proof.


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 11 2012, 1:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(buzzards @ Oct. 11 2012, 10:23 am)
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Both believed that their diets made them cancer-proof.

and that is such a shame.  there are so many risk factors out there.  Diet is only one of them.

Environmental exposures to chemicals are probably the biggest.


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 16 2012, 4:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Genetics play a major role in getting cancer.  For example my grandfather and father died of prostate cancer and my brother has been treated for prostate cancer.  No matter how good my diet, how much I exercise the risk will still be there.  

I have a friend that had ovarian cancer and has the genetic markers for breast cancer.  She had prophylactic surgery and had her breast removed.  In her case the odds were against her and this was a reasonable approach.  Now she feels she has done everything she can and the anxiety about getting breast cancer is greatly reduced.


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