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Topic: Athlete's foot< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 19 2013, 6:54 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Anyone have a cure for INTRACTABLE athlete's foot? Been making me nuts for 4 months.

Treatments I've tried:

garlic (systemic and topical)
chlotrimazole (useless)
tetraconazole spray
apple cider vinegar
hydrogen peroxide (bad skin burn)
alcohol
Terbinafine: Initially seemed to cure it immediately, but it returned very quickly.
Don't wear shoes
Wash feet every day
Try to keep towels, bedding, etc. clean
Have continued all treatments for a long time
Diet: I eat NO sugar whatsoever, no white products, no mushrooms, and try to go easy on the carbs.

I'm reluctant to take antifungal pills because of the impact on the liver.

I originally got athlete's foot in the gym shower about 5 years ago. It decided to take up permanent residence.

Heeeeeeeelp!!!
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 19 2013, 8:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You've tried all of the usual stuff.

Time to see a skin or foot doc.  Either should be able to prescribe something that will work.  After all, that is what they spent a lot of time getting an education for.  If they can't cure it, ask if you can co-publish in JAMA.

Spend some time detailing what you used, how long and the results.  Pictures would help.

House hold strength vinegar (any type) makes an acid environment.  Fungi (if that is what you have) don't do well in acidic bath.  You might find out that you don't have a fungus infection.  

Good thinking to be careful of a liver problem with an anti-fugus procedure...even if it is .01% risk.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 19 2013, 9:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

This may seem wierd but are you sure its Atheletes foot. I thought I had the same thing from running. As it turns out I have very dry feet and needed to moisturize them with hand cream. When I keep them moistuized they are fine but miss a day or two and back to cracked itchy feet. My 2 ¢'s
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 20 2013, 2:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

id try moisturizing as mentioned above... if not see a skin dr... good luck
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 20 2013, 9:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(SPeacock @ Feb. 19 2013, 8:00 pm)
QUOTE
You've tried all of the usual stuff.

Time to see a skin or foot doc.  Either should be able to prescribe something that will work.  After all, that is what they spent a lot of time getting an education for.  If they can't cure it, ask if you can co-publish in JAMA.

Spend some time detailing what you used, how long and the results.  Pictures would help.

House hold strength vinegar (any type) makes an acid environment.  Fungi (if that is what you have) don't do well in acidic bath.  You might find out that you don't have a fungus infection.  

Good thinking to be careful of a liver problem with an anti-fugus procedure...even if it is .01% risk.

I guess you're right, time to see a doctor. I think this might actually be cellulitis (bacterial infection). It's now spread to one finger.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 20 2013, 10:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

i had athlete's foot so bad, the over the counter stuff and the prescription strength stuff the doctor gave me did nothing. I am apparently allergic to the fungus too so get little blisters on my hands as well.

I got an herbal soak for apple cider vinegar and followed instructions. After it cleared up the problem, my toe nails grew back, my skin stopped sloughing off in layers... I still soak in cheap apple cider vinegar from time to time.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 4:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Problem solved, I think/hope/pray. I realized I was switching back and forth among different treatments and not allowing them to work. I did terbinafine cream (not spray) for two weeks and it cleared up. I'm going to do another 2 weeks for good measure. The pharmacist told me terbinafine is the strongest OTC medication.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2013, 7:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Let us know what worked for you.

Sounded kinda gnarly.


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I know shoe-fu
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 07 2013, 3:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Good call on the prolonged treatment. It can take a long time to get rid of fungus which is much more resilient than bacterial infections. Soaking in vinegar as suggested daily is a good idea, then rinsing, dry thoroughly, and apply the anti-fungal cream/lotion. Avoid peroxide as it will damage fresh growing skin. White vinegar is probably just as effective as apple cider and a lot cheaper for large quantities, it's the acidity and chemical nature of the acetic acid that gives the anti-microbial properties.

If you're not wearing shoes, what are you wearing? Sandals I presume? If you're going barefoot in sandals you are providing an environment to host the fungus unless you are washing them thoroughly every day (ok for synthetic materials, not good for leather). A lot of people make the mistake (not necessarily saying you) of thinking leather footbeds are anti-microbial when they make ideal places for microbial growth. Most birkenstocks get pretty stinky for people with sweaty/dirty feet.

Anyway, I'd also be certain to wash any shoes and boots you've been wearing while experiencing the athletes foot - let them soak in hot water with detergent, a very mild bleach solution, or hydrogen peroxide. I'd scrub down sandal footbeds daily, especially if you're not wearing socks. Wash your socks in hot water after each use, and swap pairs multiple times daily if possible. Cotton socks are probably best because it wicks the moisture off your feet so it keeps them drier but thin wool is good too. Don't use synthetics or cotton blends of less than 70%.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 22 2013, 7:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Terbinafine - That's good info. Thx

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