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Topic: Best Light-Weight Sleeping Bag< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 18 2012, 12:06 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm a beginner at back packing, and need a good sleeping bag.  Preferably, a 0 degree.  And light weight, I'm also about 6"1'.  Can anyone help me about, I dont know which bag to pick and would like one at a reasonable price.

Thanks
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 18 2012, 1:32 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

As with most things... it depends.

First, are you sleeping in zero-degree conditions?  If you're summer backpacking where things might get below freezing (~32F), buying a zero-degree bag is just going to leave you realizing you overbought and likely looking for a lighter bag later.  But it depends greatly upon where in the country/world you plan to backpack and what seasons you'll routinely be camping in.

I use a zero-degree bag when it's winter out and I'm camping on several feet of snow.  The entire rest of the year I sleep comfortably in a 40*F bag, and wear an extra fleece to bed when temps dip to freezing.  Saves me at least a pound over my 0*F bag.

Describing what conditions you plan to encounter (as best as you know them) will help people give realistic suggestions.  If you don't know the exact temps yet, describe the area of the country you plan to hike in, as there are experienced folks here that hail from pretty-much every state in the country, and they can let you know what to expect.

Just my starting $.02.  Best of luck, and welcome!

- Mike


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 18 2012, 2:40 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

One of our most respected posters is currently selling his warm bags, so that is one way to reduce cost.  Check for Rayestrella, in the Mountaineering section.

Most beginners get by with a 20* bag for 3 season use, then later add a warmer bag for snow or Winter camping.  


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 18 2012, 4:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If you're up for used gear, a lot of great (lightweight) stuff goes on sale in Backpackinglight's Gear Swap forum.  You can Google it.  Most of the good stuff goes quickly, so don't dally on an item if you see it, but it's good stuff.  I've made a few good scores.

I have no idea how some of folks stay financially solvent there, given the pace they go through gear (buy it, use it once, sell it for something newer a month later).  But c'est la vie, their loss is your gain, as it were.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 18 2012, 6:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(celtics586 @ Jan. 18 2012, 12:06 pm)
QUOTE
I'm a beginner at back packing, and need a good sleeping bag.  Preferably, a 0 degree.  And light weight, I'm also about 6"1'.  Can anyone help me about, I dont know which bag to pick and would like one at a reasonable price.

Thanks

I agree you don't need a 0F bag unless you're getting another one for warmer weather. I have an REI 20F (likely 25-30 in reality) down bag and have used it from -2 (with full clothing and good pads) to 70. For normal 3-season use I'd go for an accurately rated 40F bag. If you're only going to have one bag for everything like I do, a 20F should work if used right. At 6'1" you may need a long also.

I'll 2nd the rec for BPL's Ger Swap. Lots of good stuff available as people upgrade.

It was written for Scouting, but I think the paper I just finished may help you out on gear selection and what is really needed if you want to go light.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 19 2012, 12:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The ultimate would be to pick up a western mountaineering bag on sale if you are looking for down.  Synthetics, I'd look at a quilt, or even a DIY quilt (climashield doesn't even need "quilting", just perimeter sewing and doesn't
even need to be 100%).

Depends if your conditions are wet or dry.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 21 2012, 1:14 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The North Face Aleutian is $70 for the long model and it is a 20 degree bag. That is what I use. I also wear a LOT of clothes since I am always cold. Then again I have a thick sleeping pad and a black diamond winter tent too.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 21 2012, 10:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Where and when are you going?

Not all 0 degree bags are really good to 0. After shopping extensively through the Marmot bags and staring at many EN ratings there, I note that there is a 0 degree bag that is labeled three season, and other 0 degree bags are actually for winter. And cheap bags can easily be 10-30 degrees colder than the rating on the label... I started cheap and realized that those cheap bags are actually quite expensive, in that you'll never be warm to the advertised temp and you'll end up replacing it rather quickly. Buying what you need the first time is the really cheap way to go. And if you intend to backpack many times, for some years to come, a really nice bag is the best choice - Western Mountaineering, Marmot, Feathered Friends...

An actual 0 degree bag, not a bag labeled 0 degree that won't cut the mustard, will be overkill for 3 season backpacking most of the time.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 21 2012, 11:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hey AlmostThere how do you tell if it's 3 or 4 season?
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 21 2012, 11:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

OP http://www.thenorthface.com/catalog....ht.html

or

http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___47936
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2012, 12:00 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(ol-zeke @ Jan. 18 2012, 2:40 pm)
QUOTE
One of our most respected posters is currently selling his warm bags, so that is one way to reduce cost.  Check for Rayestrella, in the Mountaineering section.

Most beginners get by with a 20* bag for 3 season use, then later add a warmer bag for snow or Winter camping.  

They must not live where I do or have ever gone to the Grand Canyon. Yes deserts drop down to near freezing at night, but not actually inside the grand canyon! Hottest nights rest EVER.

I was wearing my day clothes, minus jeans of course, in my 20 degree Aleutian 3 season bag in what I think was 20-40 degrees and it was the best nights rest I have ever had. Then again I had a nice therm-a-rest and a 4 season tent, and we slept on a sandbar (not related to heat)

Looking back I wish I had a 4 season 20 degree bag or a 0 degree bag.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2012, 12:28 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(InactiveUser @ Jan. 22 2012, 12:00 am)
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They must not live where I do or have ever gone to the Grand Canyon. Yes deserts drop down to near freezing at night, but not actually inside the grand canyon! Hottest nights rest EVER.

Umm, really?  I've seen single digits on the rim in November in at least four different years, and down to 20F at the bottom.   ol-zeke has spent more time there than I have, so I imagine he's seen colder.

As far as deserts in general, they get an awful lot colder than "near freezing".


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2012, 12:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(big_load @ Jan. 22 2012, 12:28 am)
QUOTE

(InactiveUser @ Jan. 22 2012, 12:00 am)
QUOTE
They must not live where I do or have ever gone to the Grand Canyon. Yes deserts drop down to near freezing at night, but not actually inside the grand canyon! Hottest nights rest EVER.

Umm, really?  I've seen single digits on the rim in November in at least four different years, and down to 20F at the bottom.   ol-zeke has spent more time there than I have, so I imagine he's seen colder.

As far as deserts in general, they get an awful lot colder than "near freezing".

That was my experience once. Not saying it happens all the time, but where I live the humidity makes winter far worse.

I've been in 20 degree weather here with 100% humidity with high winds and have never been colder in 3-4 layers of clothes. Then I've been in -20 up in Colorado with high winds with almost no humidity in pants and a t-shirt having a snowball fight during a snowstorm.

Yes there are desserts that get down to -140ish but who goes there?

ANYWAY! OP I found something for ya

http://www.thenorthface.com/catalog....nId=7D8

http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___47672
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 26 2012, 3:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(InactiveUser @ Jan. 21 2012, 9:53 pm)
QUOTE

(big_load @ Jan. 22 2012, 12:28 am)
QUOTE

(InactiveUser @ Jan. 22 2012, 12:00 am)
QUOTE
They must not live where I do or have ever gone to the Grand Canyon. Yes deserts drop down to near freezing at night, but not actually inside the grand canyon! Hottest nights rest EVER.

Umm, really?  I've seen single digits on the rim in November in at least four different years, and down to 20F at the bottom.   ol-zeke has spent more time there than I have, so I imagine he's seen colder.

As far as deserts in general, they get an awful lot colder than "near freezing".

That was my experience once. Not saying it happens all the time, but where I live the humidity makes winter far worse.

I've been in 20 degree weather here with 100% humidity with high winds and have never been colder in 3-4 layers of clothes. Then I've been in -20 up in Colorado with high winds with almost no humidity in pants and a t-shirt having a snowball fight during a snowstorm.

Yes there are desserts that get down to -140ish but who goes there?

ANYWAY! OP I found something for ya

http://www.thenorthface.com/catalog....nId=7D8

[URL=http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product_47672[/URL]

Why are you here because it's obviously not to contribute anything useful. Are you just comic relief?

If the OP is looking for a 0 degree bag, I suggest you check them out in person if they are not EN rated. Compare similar loft levels to get an idea. Each person is different but in general, I've found approximately 4 inches of loft to be good down to 0. In synthetics, I've found it to be slightly less because of the more dense fibers having an effect. Mind you, the loft over a much shorter time will be drastically reduced on a synthetic. After two years worth of use, most of my synthetics will lose easily an inch if not two.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 26 2012, 7:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tigger @ Jan. 26 2012, 3:23 pm)
QUOTE

(InactiveUser @ Jan. 21 2012, 9:53 pm)
QUOTE

(big_load @ Jan. 22 2012, 12:28 am)
QUOTE

(InactiveUser @ Jan. 22 2012, 12:00 am)
QUOTE
They must not live where I do or have ever gone to the Grand Canyon. Yes deserts drop down to near freezing at night, but not actually inside the grand canyon! Hottest nights rest EVER.

Umm, really?  I've seen single digits on the rim in November in at least four different years, and down to 20F at the bottom.   ol-zeke has spent more time there than I have, so I imagine he's seen colder.

As far as deserts in general, they get an awful lot colder than "near freezing".

That was my experience once. Not saying it happens all the time, but where I live the humidity makes winter far worse.

I've been in 20 degree weather here with 100% humidity with high winds and have never been colder in 3-4 layers of clothes. Then I've been in -20 up in Colorado with high winds with almost no humidity in pants and a t-shirt having a snowball fight during a snowstorm.

Yes there are desserts that get down to -140ish but who goes there?

ANYWAY! OP I found something for ya

http://www.thenorthface.com/catalog....nId=7D8

[URL=http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product_47672[/URL]

Why are you here because it's obviously not to contribute anything useful. Are you just comic relief?

If the OP is looking for a 0 degree bag, I suggest you check them out in person if they are not EN rated. Compare similar loft levels to get an idea. Each person is different but in general, I've found approximately 4 inches of loft to be good down to 0. In synthetics, I've found it to be slightly less because of the more dense fibers having an effect. Mind you, the loft over a much shorter time will be drastically reduced on a synthetic. After two years worth of use, most of my synthetics will lose easily an inch if not two.

Did you not read any of my other posts? I posted a great inexpensive lightweight 0 degree bag. I actually spent a few hours searching to help the OP...and myself in the process.

That post was a joke, it was heavy, -40, and EXPENSIVE!
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 26 2012, 7:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I read all of your posts in this thread. I stand by my statement.

Edit: To be fair, I should clarify. You posted inaccurate information regarding temps/conditions in argument to one of the long time members who's been backpacking for years. Then basically deny you said it when questioned and throw it off as you continue to throw out "ideas". You pick a couple random bags off the internet and offer them up as good advice. In several posts, you contradict yourself, suggesting that they use what you have, saying how you are cold so you wear clothing and such, talk about your tent, and then state you wish you had a 20-0 degree bag instead. It's almost like you're arguing with yourself.

It very much seems like you are causing nothing but confusion to the OP and not trying to help at all, if you indeed have some expertise/education/outdoor skills.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 26 2012, 8:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tigger @ Jan. 26 2012, 7:29 pm)
QUOTE
I read all of your posts in this thread. I stand by my statement.

Edit: To be fair, I should clarify. You posted inaccurate information regarding temps/conditions in argument to one of the long time members who's been backpacking for years. Then basically deny you said it when questioned and throw it off as you continue to throw out "ideas". You pick a couple random bags off the internet and offer them up as good advice. In several posts, you contradict yourself, suggesting that they use what you have, saying how you are cold so you wear clothing and such, talk about your tent, and then state you wish you had a 20-0 degree bag instead. It's almost like you're arguing with yourself.

It very much seems like you are causing nothing but confusion to the OP and not trying to help at all, if you indeed have some expertise/education/outdoor skills.

Why are you attacking me on a personal level? Why can't something be simple rather than going to the extreme where you have to insult someone and make it something that it's not? Why can't you ask questions instead of going straight to picking me apart as if you are a psychologist?

Did you think that I posted my info, then read, then researched, then corrected myself without noting it?

You are getting on to me for the same thing you are doing right now. Not asking questions before posting. All I did was mention my sleeping bag and how inexpensive it is as an option since other people were talking about only needing a 20 degree bag. Mine was in the 20+ category instead of being a 4 season 20 degree bag as someone mentioned. It doesn't work that well in the cold and maybe a lightweight 0 degree bag isn't a good option since you need that insulating material to be warm.

All that you are doing is insulting ME, and somehow I am the bad person in this conversation? Grow up. I thought people got past this when they left high school.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 26 2012, 8:38 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If you consider giving bad advice an insult, so be it. I consider it dangerous and don't put up with it.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 26 2012, 8:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

BTW Inactive guy.. that 0°F Northface is almost 5lbs... not quite ultralight by any means. The OP wants Ultra Light recomendations.

http://www.thenorthface.com/catalog....nId=7D8

have you checked the specs of your recomendation?

Inactive guy, where are you from?

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 26 2012, 9:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(InactiveUser @ Jan. 26 2012, 8:03 pm)
QUOTE
Why are you attacking me on a personal level? Why can't something be simple rather than going to the extreme where you have to insult someone and make it something that it's not? Why can't you ask questions instead of going straight to picking me apart as if you are a psychologist?

Did you think that I posted my info, then read, then researched, then corrected myself without noting it?

This is a suggestion, not an attack.

If you re-read what Tigger said, he is all about your advice, not you personally. You'd do better on the internet in general if you learn the difference between confronting the information and attacking the poster.

And I too think that you need to pay a little more attention to what you're saying. If you don't have the experience to give informed advice, wait til a post comes along where you do....

There is a vast difference between having a winter outing where subzero temps are expected repeatedly, and being out in summer and experiencing a brief dip in temps at night. You prepare differently for each. A 0 degree bag doesn't enter the picture for me until it's truly warranted, because it represents a weight jump from 1.5 lbs to 4 lbs.

Manufacturers start to label bags as being winter rated at 15F - never seen a 20F 4 season bag. And it's advisable to pay attention not to labels of "winter" but to actual expected temps - a 0F bag is of little use in the Alaskan winter, for example, unless you are pairing it with overbag(s) that will get you -40 or lower.... In Florida, you might get away with a 30F bag in December. Here in California, I'm all about layers and the 20F quilt, until winter.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 26 2012, 10:40 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

He was talking about me contradicting myself and arguing with myself when I was correcting myself.

I live in Arkansas, where the winter can get very cold (-20) and still has high humidity so it feels even colder especially with our wind storms. We get more ice here than snow.

I'm not going to go into why I have problems misunderstanding what people say because people misunderstand what I used to explain why that happened. Which is something I am sick of dealing with, and is even why I rarely leave my house or socialize.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 26 2012, 11:32 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(InactiveUser @ Jan. 26 2012, 7:40 pm)
QUOTE
He was talking about me contradicting myself and arguing with myself when I was correcting myself.

I live in Arkansas, where the winter can get very cold (-20) and still has high humidity so it feels even colder especially with our wind storms. We get more ice here than snow.

I'm not going to go into why I have problems misunderstanding what people say because people misunderstand what I used to explain why that happened. Which is something I am sick of dealing with, and is even why I rarely leave my house or socialize.

"They must not live where I do or have ever gone to the Grand Canyon. Yes deserts drop down to near freezing at night, but not actually inside the grand canyon! Hottest nights rest EVER.

I was wearing my day clothes, minus jeans of course, in my 20 degree Aleutian 3 season bag in what I think was 20-40 degrees and it was the best nights rest I have ever had. Then again I had a nice therm-a-rest and a 4 season tent, and we slept on a sandbar (not related to heat)

Looking back I wish I had a 4 season 20 degree bag or a 0 degree bag."

This...is the "argument" which I was referring to.

You have statements like "100% humidity with high winds and have never been colder in 3-4 layers of clothes." What does that have to do with bag choice? I use 3 layers (base, insulating, and shell) in 80+ winds in 100% humidity in temps below 0 and been quite comfortable. In fact, I was in similar conditions just two weeks ago. The only thing that tells me is that you don't know how to dress properly for the conditions you're in and has nothing to do with the warmth of a sleeping bag other than the risk of losing loft over time (in reference to the humidity). Mind you, your body pumps out 4-6 cups of moisture out through your bag in any given night for the average person which will affect your bag much more than any humidity unless out for an extended time.

Your tent doesn't provide warmth. It provides a wind block and has basically negligible warmth in regards to a person's sleep setup. You keep talking about wind storms like it's going to affect your sleep at night and what bag you should choose. If you're in a four season tent, the most you should feel inside the shelter is a light breeze, even in a completely exposed area without a wind break. I know...I've spent many years, every winter in the worst storms I can find because I enjoy weathering a good storm. Once again...NO effect on your bag choice.

The only thing I've seen which could have been decent information is that your sleeping pad below you is just as critical as the rating of your bag itself. As an example, I won't go out in winter without a combined R value of 5 as a minimum and recommend two pads in case of catastrophic failure.

If you're not going to educate or explain what or why you're using components and just haphazardly throwing out information, don't bother throwing out "ideas" at all, because you're basically just throwing darts blindfolded in a wind storm from what I can read.

Whatever you want to call it, your "information" is unclear at best. I'm done explaining and if you don't get it, at least hopefully the OP will understand why they might consider avoiding your "help".

"I'm not going to go into why I have problems misunderstanding what people say because people misunderstand what I used to explain why that happened. Which is something I am sick of dealing with, and is even why I rarely leave my house or socialize."

What? All our bases are all belong to us


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 26 2012, 11:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Since the OP has never responded to his original question, and "inactive user" is just trolling, I'd offer the Western Mountaineering Versalite as the best bang for the buck 3 season bag on the Planet.

Conservatively rated at 10F and 2 lbs 0 oz.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2012, 5:18 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm trolling? When you guys are insulting me? Thanks, I really appreciate every time I TRY to socialize people sit there and insult me when I am actually on topic and talking about my experiences. You want me to stay on topic but you sit there and go off an a tangent and insult me for my social deficits from someone almost killing me and cracking my skull open. I may have social deficits, but yours aren't any better. Grow up. I have a severe traumatic brain injury, and before you go off and misunderstand that I clearly said INJURY. Which isn't the same thing as brain damage which is permanent. Every single person I've told got that wrong, so it's safe to say that you did too.

Correct someone, don't sit there and over analyze and insult me when I am trying to help! Ask questions first. I posted two 0 degree bags, one is expensive and lighter weight and the other is inexpensive and heavier.

Seriously just leave me alone, I can't handle any more stress in my life.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2012, 8:49 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Take it easy. We really don't take any of this serious n besides, everyone is entitled to an opinion.

The nice thing about this forum... if you don't like what is being said, just ignore it n move on, no need to dwell on it.

I hope you recover your injuries, sorry to hear about it.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2012, 10:21 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If anyone was trying to insult you, I might support your point.

Your problem is not what other people are doing, it's your perception of what they are saying that gets you into trouble. As a therapist I deal with this sort of thing all the time. So I recommend that you do something for yourself to prevent this sort of upset and distress from continuing - get out and talk to a licensed therapist about communication skills that will help you in your goal of socializing without getting hurt.

And no, I'm not saying you are crazy - therapists can't help crazy people. They can help people with relationship issues, however. Whatever that relationship may be. It's actually about all I'm trained to do, myself.

Until you own the responsibility for your part in this and recognize what you are doing to cause yourself stress I fear you are only going to continue along that path, and I feel for you, since that is a truly miserable and isolated path.

Continuing to behave the way you are behaving online is going to look like trolling, yes. That's what people think of folks who intentionally stir up arguments for no obvious reason. It gets you thrown off forums. So rather than see that happen, I'm suggesting a possible solution for you. Take a deep breath, count to 10, and understand that no one is really trying to insult you - I know it can feel that way. But it's just not true. We get concerned when people try to give advice and only confuse the person asking.... Backpacking carries a good bit of risk and taking the wrong gear can be deadly. So YES, bad advice will be questioned by people who know otherwise because they have more experience.

Your injuries may have been traumatic, but they don't release you from the responsibility for what you do and say. If anything I would hope you realize just what the dangers are and do something to mitigate them, instead of making excuses for yourself.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2012, 11:11 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(InactiveUser @ Jan. 27 2012, 2:18 am)
QUOTE
I'm trolling? When you guys are insulting me? Thanks, I really appreciate every time I TRY to socialize people sit there and insult me when I am actually on topic and talking about my experiences. You want me to stay on topic but you sit there and go off an a tangent and insult me for my social deficits from someone almost killing me and cracking my skull open. I may have social deficits, but yours aren't any better. Grow up. I have a severe traumatic brain injury, and before you go off and misunderstand that I clearly said INJURY. Which isn't the same thing as brain damage which is permanent. Every single person I've told got that wrong, so it's safe to say that you did too.

Correct someone, don't sit there and over analyze and insult me when I am trying to help! Ask questions first. I posted two 0 degree bags, one is expensive and lighter weight and the other is inexpensive and heavier.

Seriously just leave me alone, I can't handle any more stress in my life.

It has nothing to do with social skills. Your "advice" is inaccurate and unclear. Some of it could get somebody hurt or worse. I don't know you personally and don't care. If I see blatant incorrect advice given, it will be pointed out. It has nothing to do with "picking on you". It's what grownups do.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2012, 11:20 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(InactiveUser @ Jan. 22 2012, 12:00 am)
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(ol-zeke @ Jan. 18 2012, 2:40 pm)
QUOTE
Most beginners get by with a 20* bag for 3 season use, then later add a warmer bag for snow or Winter camping.  

They must not live where I do or have ever gone to the Grand Canyon. Yes deserts drop down to near freezing at night, but not actually inside the grand canyon! Hottest nights rest EVER.

I was wearing my day clothes, minus jeans of course, in my 20 degree Aleutian 3 season bag in what I think was 20-40 degrees and it was the best nights rest I have ever had. Then again I had a nice therm-a-rest and a 4 season tent, and we slept on a sandbar (not related to heat)

Looking back I wish I had a 4 season 20 degree bag or a 0 degree bag.

I had a 20* bag for my first GC hike.  It was early May and we got a couple of inches of snow on Horseshoe Mesa.

Not sure what you mean by a "20 degree 3 season bag" vs a "20 degree 4 season bag".

But there's a huge difference between a 20* bag and a 0* bag.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2012, 6:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tigger @ Jan. 27 2012, 11:11 am)
QUOTE

(InactiveUser @ Jan. 27 2012, 2:18 am)
QUOTE
I'm trolling? When you guys are insulting me? Thanks, I really appreciate every time I TRY to socialize people sit there and insult me when I am actually on topic and talking about my experiences. You want me to stay on topic but you sit there and go off an a tangent and insult me for my social deficits from someone almost killing me and cracking my skull open. I may have social deficits, but yours aren't any better. Grow up. I have a severe traumatic brain injury, and before you go off and misunderstand that I clearly said INJURY. Which isn't the same thing as brain damage which is permanent. Every single person I've told got that wrong, so it's safe to say that you did too.

Correct someone, don't sit there and over analyze and insult me when I am trying to help! Ask questions first. I posted two 0 degree bags, one is expensive and lighter weight and the other is inexpensive and heavier.

Seriously just leave me alone, I can't handle any more stress in my life.

It has nothing to do with social skills. Your "advice" is inaccurate and unclear. Some of it could get somebody hurt or worse. I don't know you personally and don't care. If I see blatant incorrect advice given, it will be pointed out. It has nothing to do with "picking on you". It's what grownups do.

WTF did I just say?!

LEAVE.
ME.
ALONE.

I am not even reading your post so you just wasted your own time.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 27 2012, 8:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Best bag and reasonable price are two different things.

I would recommend you shoot for a 700 fill bag or better. However, be warned that the 850 fill bags run steep in price. Western Mountaineering and Feathered Friends are pretty much at the top of the heap in my opinion. Something a step down from there will get you a decent bag at a "reasonable" price. If you truly want a good bag, I'd ignore synthetics altogether. I'd recommend looking in the $300 range, give or take. Steep and Cheap and other such sites are a great place to get a bang for the buck but if you're not sure, it would be a better idea to get one from REI where you take it back, no questions asked and trade it out if you realize you were off the mark with your needs.

There is no "best" bag. Each bag has it's own characteristics and they are getting more extreme as time goes on. Now we have everything from quilts, zipperless bags, to full features bag expander attachments, bottomless, and "stretch" bags.


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