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Topic: Given up< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
TimmyToes Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 26 2012, 8:34 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Since going ultralight I haven had to give up certain things, but in the long run i am really more happy because im more comfortable.  Such as my new frameless pack and tarptent i love them so much for there weight saving and they are great gear all around.  

Whats some of the gear other people have given up or upgraded and were happy about?


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Franco Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 26 2012, 6:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Have you  heard the comment " I have loads of UL gear ?"
Well the trick is not to take it all...
Yes there are two major ways to cut weight and it works better if you use both.
One is to use lighter gear and the other is to take less gear.
My way is to put "comfort" first, so obviously less weight is more comfortable however , for example, if I need to carry a lot of water then a frameless pack does not work for me so there goes another pound of weight...
Of late I have started to wear more clothing inside the sleeping bag and therefore switched to a lighter bag.
The clothing I wear are what I use at camp anyway so it works for me both in comfort and weight.
(the trick with clothing in bed is to have them clean and dry, so I keep a camp/night layer (socks/t/leggings))
BTW, it sounds like a cliche' but the bigger the pack , the more stuff one puts in.
So with the same pack I end up having almost exactly the same weight for 3 as I do for 5 days (and I am aware of that...)
Franco
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camper10469 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 26 2012, 6:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I do mostly winter backpacking n have always had problems with hanging around camp.. long frigid nights n plumiting single digit temps.

I bought Montbell's Thermawrap pants n the UL Inner Down Parka (has a long cut n a hood). I've been nice n toasty ever since without having to carry so many heavy bulky insulating layers. Each is only 7oz and can pack to the size of a baseball. This combo takes me to minus 10F with only my usual 2 thin whickers n an outter windproof jacket. My legs don't need as much so the pants alone under my hiking pants is more than enough.

The weight to warmth ratio is worth it's weight in gold.

My next project is feet.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 26 2012, 7:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That is what I have done.
In winter I now carry WM down  pants and jacket and switched to the WM Summerlite from an Ultra Lite.
Combined weight is about the same but I am warm at camp and don't get cold during my nightime pee session..
I always have with me (in winter) an eVent rain jacket and rain pants, Both large enough for the layers underneath.
On my feet,  I have ditched the spare pair of light "camp shoes" and use a layering system on my feet.
At camp I wash (or wipe..) my feet , put a pair of thin Coolmax socks on, over that a couple of plastic bread bags ( or RBH socks) over that my day socks and wear my boots undone.
In bed , you can warm up your feet fast wearing stuff sacks or those 'bread bags" .
(in emergency, the liner of my winter pack is a large stuff sack...)
Franco
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 27 2012, 1:12 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm happy with my three-season ultralight backpacking setup and have pretty much stopped fiddling with it for the past 2 or 3 years. All my needs are comfortably met with a lightweight package.

My winter load still needs some attention. That said, the only major changes I can make with my winter gear are my winter backpack and sleeping bag. Part of the issue is that my -20 degree bag takes up a lot of space, requiring a large pack. I'd love to be able to "give up" some of that weight.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 27 2012, 9:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(vinovampire @ Mar. 27 2012, 1:12 pm)
QUOTE
I'm happy with my three-season ultralight backpacking setup and have pretty much stopped fiddling with it for the past 2 or 3 years. All my needs are comfortably met with a lightweight package.

My winter load still needs some attention. That said, the only major changes I can make with my winter gear are my winter backpack and sleeping bag. Part of the issue is that my -20 degree bag takes up a lot of space, requiring a large pack. I'd love to be able to "give up" some of that weight.

The trick is as mentioned above to learn what you can wear inside a bag to increase its temperature range. A good example would be to have the montbell thermawrap pants and jacket (or similar) for camp wear, keep 'em dry (with your shell garments) and wear them to bed inside the sleeping bag.

Can you experiment with what you have at home?
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vinovampire Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 29 2012, 1:11 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(3pinner @ Mar. 27 2012, 9:01 pm)
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The trick is as mentioned above to learn what you can wear inside a bag to increase its temperature range. A good example would be to have the montbell thermawrap pants and jacket (or similar) for camp wear, keep 'em dry (with your shell garments) and wear them to bed inside the sleeping bag.

Can you experiment with what you have at home?

Agreed. That is the trick. My -20 down isn't too heavy, it's just bulky. I think I just need a 0 degree down bag, and then as you suggested, add layers on the nights that go below 0 degrees F. My down booties and Mercury Mitts add a lot of warmth.

Right now, I have three bag options: -20, 20, and 35. I think the gap between those two temps is too large.

My full winter load is 44lbs with all my 4-season gear, crampons, ice ax and three days of food/water/fuel. I'd like to get that down below 40 lbs for next season.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 29 2012, 5:07 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

My down booties and Mercury Mitts add a lot of warmth
And don't forget a warm hat....
What I like about the system is that because you are wearing the stuff anyway, you just slide in the bag and don't get cold getting changed.
(I used a liner before but that is extra weight,single use and you do get tangled up a bit )
I find that the best way to have a warm night is to get into the sac warm, if you are cold when you get in it takes a lot of loft to warm up and once you do you will start to sweat.
Then you get cold again...
An added bonus is that when I wake up needing to pee I don't spent half an hour thinking about it (IE can I be bothered to get dressed...) I just unzip the bag, get out, close the bag slide my boots on and have the pee.
(or just do it in the vestibule if the weather is not the best outside...)

Another advantage is that with a more compact SB you can also pack better, that is place the heavy items in the middle close to the back, therefore you spend less energy walking.
Franco
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