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Topic: REI Flash 18 - for overnighter?, Make an overnight setup that fits in 18L< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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KestrelL Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 01 2012, 8:03 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hello!  I'm new here, but I'm attempting to create a lightweight system that would work for me, and be able to be packed in the REI Flash 18.  I'm quite fond of this pack and use it all the time for day hikes, but I'd like to create a system that will fit in the Flash 18 for an overnight.

I'm starting with next to nothing - everything I own is far too bulky and heavy, although I'd probably figure out a way to lash my z-lite sleeping pad to the outside of the pack.

I'd mainly be using this in the Fall in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan (where I attend college).  I don't have much time for anything but overnights, being a college student.  I also don't have that much money, so cost is an issue.

So, can this be done?  More importantly, can it be done within a college student's budget?  What gear would you suggest?

Thanks for your help!
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 02 2012, 11:07 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(KestrelL @ Jul. 01 2012, 7:03 pm)
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importantly, can it be done within a college student's budget?  

Honestly, for fall in the UP? I don't think so.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 02 2012, 1:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That day pack isn't made for loads over 10-13 pounds.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 02 2012, 1:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Alright, fair enough.  I wasn't sure if that would be possible and it sounds like it's not, at least with my constraints.

Oh well, I still get a lot of use out of that pack!
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 04 2012, 12:01 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Oh yeah, I am not knocking the pack at all.

http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews....strella

Just saying it most likely can't work for what you want (and can afford) to do.


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SW Mtn backpacker Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 07 2012, 12:26 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Weight -wise, a sub-ultralight (below 5 lbs) system could work but volumes would be an issue without serious $$$$ (UL down quilt, cuben poncho-tarp, etc...think the guy who custom made UL down sleeping pads went out of business).  Then again, the last "Complete Walker" (IV) had a fall Rockies packing list that fit into a large fanny pack.  May want to check used books.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 27 2012, 9:06 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Shelter wouldn't be an issue (MYOG tarp), but you'd certainly need a down quilt/bag. You also don't mention what if any clothing you have. I'll assume your z-lite would be enough pad for the temps you expect. Perhaps my paper will give you some ideas. It focuses on inexpensive yet lightweight gear.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 27 2012, 10:45 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm a huge fan of the Flash 18 (I use it on virtually every BPtrip as a tent stuff bag and summit pack), but I just don't see how this could be possible. I often find it a little on the small side for side day trips from a base camp.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 27 2012, 11:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I get all of my gear (12 pounds) for 2 nights in a 24L, and that includes a hammock with tarp.  If you were able to sleep under a tarp alone, perhaps it would all fit.  The problem, as I see it, is your budgetary constraints.  I have $400 tied up in pad, sleeping quilt, and tarp.  The rest of the stuff (stove, food, etc...) can be had cheaply.  Down warmth is not cheap, and Falls in Michigan can turn cool in a hurry.  Sorry.  

http://forums.backpacker.com/cgi-bin....1158772


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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 27 2012, 3:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(topshot @ Jul. 27 2012, 9:06 am)
QUOTE
Shelter wouldn't be an issue (MYOG tarp), but you'd certainly need a down quilt/bag. You also don't mention what if any clothing you have. I'll assume your z-lite would be enough pad for the temps you expect. Perhaps my paper will give you some ideas. It focuses on inexpensive yet lightweight gear.

I just read this.  Really nice paper!  Thanks for posting it!
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 27 2012, 3:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks. Hope it helps.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 06 2012, 8:59 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I picked up an REI Flash 18 yesterday and used it for an afternoon of dayhiking, barely fitting my 2 L Camelbak, rainjacket (actually a 9 oz pullover), 9 oz R1 fleece pullover, and 4 oz Houdini '12 windshell - plus a bagel.    I just don't see it for an overnight without using a poncho-tarp for both shelter and rain protection, quilt instead of sleeping bag, etc..  

Maybe by sewing in a perimeter mesh pocket...


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 14 2012, 12:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Just wanted to add my 2-cents on this topic. I agree that it's not meant for large/heavy loads. The most I've carried in mine is about 8 lbs. Granted, I don't even feel it, but that is even a lot for the way the pack is made from only ripstop material. I think if you put too much stress on the seams, they're going to blow out sooner rather than later. That said, it's an AWESOME daypack and it has fully improved my outdoor adventures. I'm even using it now for fly fishing by adding a small pouch to the waist belt with velcro straps for my flyboxes, etc. I can wander a whole day with a 1L bladder and the Sawyer bag filter to replenish water.

If you want to use it for an overnight, you'll probably have to either use a bivvy or hammock system and a Lafuma bag. I know a guy that uses this pack for overnights:  YouTube


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 21 2012, 12:26 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Not sure how cold the UP gets when you will be there, but...

I'll be the dissenting opinion here.  I find the Flash 18 fairly easily fits plenty of gear for an over-night trip.  The gear I have carried in one has been fine for me down to 18F or so.  Not sure how much colder I could go with that gear.

I won't go into all of the gear choices but will say that it included a Neoair pad, a one pot cook set, ultralight rain/wind jacket and pants, a bivy, a tiny (5'x5') tarp, and one layer of warm-ish pile clothing, plus pile cap and gloves beyond what I was wearing.

The sleeping bag was a tiny when packed, 1 pound Mountain Hardware Phantom 45, which I find much warmer than its name suggests.   Supplemented with the pile shirt, a pair of mid weight bike tights, two pairs of socks, and inside a bivy it is warm down to pretty cold temperatures.  I was still comfy at 18F and think I could go at least a bit lower before needing to resort to using my rain/wind gear as a vapor barrier, or even wearing my pile cap or gloves.

I also had room for the my usual toiletries and other stuff.

I think if I took my tent rather than the bivy and tarp it would still work, but would be pretty tight.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 24 2012, 11:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TrailTromper @ Aug. 21 2012, 10:26 am)
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Not sure how cold the UP gets when you will be there, but...

I'll be the dissenting opinion here.  I find the Flash 18 fairly easily fits plenty of gear for an over-night trip.  The gear I have carried in one has been fine for me down to 18F or so.  Not sure how much colder I could go with that gear.

I won't go into all of the gear choices but will say that it included a Neoair pad, a one pot cook set, ...

Sounds interesting and might save me another $200 custom ultralight pack.  What type of cook kit do you have?

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 25 2012, 7:02 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

First, you should be prepared to survive an unexpected night in the woods even if all you have planned is a day hike.  But you don't have to be comfortable, you just have to stay alive.  If your day hiking pack is too small to pack what you need to survive then it is too small to be used for day hiking.  Most people can fit a minimalist survival pack in a waist belt.

On a planned overnight you probably want to be a bit more comfortable than minimal survival level.  Some want a lot more.  Some what to tough it out to go lite.

If you want to go further faster you have to either bring you physical abilities up to what is needed to carry what you want or reduce what you carry so that your existing abilities match your distance and time goals.

There are lots of people who can travel 26 miles in less than 4 hours, they just can't do it with a 20lb pack on their back.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 25 2012, 12:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(nogods @ Aug. 25 2012, 7:02 am)
QUOTE
First, you should be prepared to survive an unexpected night in the woods even if all you have planned is a day hike.  But you don't have to be comfortable, you just have to stay alive.  If your day hiking pack is too small to pack what you need to survive then it is too small to be used for day hiking.  Most people can fit a minimalist survival pack in a waist belt.

On a planned overnight you probably want to be a bit more comfortable than minimal survival level.  Some want a lot more.  Some what to tough it out to go lite.

If you want to go further faster you have to either bring you physical abilities up to what is needed to carry what you want or reduce what you carry so that your existing abilities match your distance and time goals.

There are lots of people who can travel 26 miles in less than 4 hours, they just can't do it with a 20lb pack on their back.

+1

I think you can do it (fall in the UP would seem to mean sub freezing temps at night) but to do it without a lot of very expensive gear would push it more in the realm survival camping.

If you can hike/backpack in an area where you can build a shelter from what you find in the forest (pine branch lean-to with deep bed of pine needles), build a fire reflecting wall (logs) and keep a fire going all night, you might not be too uncomfortable.

Otherwise, I think you will quickly be in "pack light, freeze at night"  territory.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 25 2012, 2:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(SW Mtn backpacker @ Aug. 24 2012, 11:33 pm)
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(TrailTromper @ Aug. 21 2012, 10:26 am)
QUOTE
Not sure how cold the UP gets when you will be there, but...

I'll be the dissenting opinion here.  I find the Flash 18 fairly easily fits plenty of gear for an over-night trip.  The gear I have carried in one has been fine for me down to 18F or so.  Not sure how much colder I could go with that gear.

I won't go into all of the gear choices but will say that it included a Neoair pad, a one pot cook set, ...

Sounds interesting and might save me another $200 custom ultralight pack.  What type of cook kit do you have?

I use:
pop can stove
1.3 liter pot
Guyot Designs MicroBites   utensils
A flint striker
A Sea to Summit X-Mug
A nylon mesh scrub pad

The stove has a heavy foil wind screen and a pot stand made out of coat hanger.   The whole works fits easily in the pot.

BTW, I find I can cram in a lot more in my pack if I use very small tight stuff sacks for all clothing.  I also use a Mountain hardware Phantom 45 bag and neoair pad which pack very small.  I find the phantom fine for much colder than it's name suggests.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 25 2012, 6:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TrailTromper @ Aug. 25 2012, 2:23 pm)
QUOTE
...I also use a Mountain hardware Phantom 45 bag and neoair pad which pack very small...

Or you could get old school with a CCF pad strapped on the outside of the pack to save some volume and probably weight.  Rain gear could also ride on the outside…
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 11 2012, 5:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm right there w/ Cweston...love it as it does double duty.

I had a lot of trouble trying to do a spring outing in a REI UL45.  Summer was easy as it was super hot up in the Adirondacks this year....not sure how to do a three season in that bag...but I have to say my Phantom 32 is now used for all but teen degrees


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 13 2012, 7:25 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(wcolucci @ Sep. 11 2012, 5:09 pm)
QUOTE
I'm right there w/ Cweston...love it as it does double duty.

I had a lot of trouble trying to do a spring outing in a REI UL45.  Summer was easy as it was super hot up in the Adirondacks this year....not sure how to do a three season in that bag...but I have to say my Phantom 32 is now used for all but teen degrees

Different styles I guess, but I can't imagine needing 45 liters of capacity for the typical spring trip, at least if going ultralight or maybe even light.

Of course it would depend on how much food you need to carry.

Also on the Mountain Hardware Phantom line...  Not sure about the 32, but I have found the 45 very conservatively rated.  I find that my Phantom 45 is fine at freezing with no extra clothing or liner.  I have used it down to the mid teens with bike tights, a warm shirt, and two pairs of socks and been quite comfortable.  I do put out heat like a furnace though.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 11 2012, 10:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have one of those bags.  No matter what I am over weight for a three night trip for what that pack was rated for.  However I can make it work in summer if I don't need to bring my quilt.  Not a chance in fall or winter.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 2:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(topshot @ Jul. 27 2012, 8:06 am)
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Perhaps my paper will give you some ideas. It focuses on inexpensive yet lightweight gear.

Nice piece. I plan on passing this article around.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 28 2012, 6:58 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Check out the new Flash 22 it might just be a better fit.
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