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Topic: Tyvek, Tyvek< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 27 2013, 12:17 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I used to belong to the Yahoo Backpackinglight forum but it recently closed, much to my dismay.  On that forum, people often said they use Tyvek for groundcloths and tarps.  I recently had to go to WV and camped using only Tyvek for cover. I wrapped my sleeping bag in it like a cocoon.  I also did this many years ago in Outward Bound using Visqueen for a month. The fourth and fifth days it rained and I got soaked.  The Tyvek was a little small but I did not think that would account for my complete drenching in 40 degree weather.  In the morning, I put the Tyvek up to the sun and saw little holes between the weave.  My question is there different types of Tyvek?  Was I using this wrong.  Any suggestions?  Thanks
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 27 2013, 7:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

"My question is there different types of Tyvek?"
yes .
Tyvek is the name of a product line (a Dupont brand) not a specific product.
Here is a list of 15 different types of Tyvek :
http://www2.dupont.com/Tyvek....es.html
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 27 2013, 8:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for the info.  Which Tyvek do you recommend and where would I purchase it?

Thanks
GB
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 27 2013, 8:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The two most popular types for backpacking are from  the Homewrap group (groundcloths and some tarps/highly water resistant but not breathable) and from the clothing type (soft,breathable but not all that water proof)  for bivvies and tarps/tents .
The cloth type, like 1443R, is probably what you have.
That works well for either brief heavy showers or drizzly weather but not where you might have hours of heavy rain.

Keep in mind that fabric performs very differently when not in contact with a hard surface.
So for example a sheet of 1443r set up as a tarp will keep rain off you a lot longer than say if you were wearing it a a rain jacket.
I have a Tarptent Sublite made with 1443R.
Works really well in hot and or humid areas, not so for either strong winds or heavy rain.
The Homewrap type is too stiff for my liking but some do use it.
Just Google "Tyvek tent tarp" and you will find loads of advice .
Some buy it on E Bay.
( I am in Australia)
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 29 2013, 1:01 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Franco,

I appreciate your input.  I am in the process of reading about the different types of Tyvek.  Thanks.

GB
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 29 2013, 1:23 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I saw on one comment that the type I have is made for Lowe's, a Big Box building supply store here in the US.  They said this type is not good for much of anything when camping.  

GB
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 03 2013, 9:55 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I would never use Tyvek of any kind for a shelter if there were any chance of rain. That's not what it's for. (And I have a Tyvek Sublite - yes, it's seen rain, and yes, it's been soaked through and turned into a heavy wet mess... )

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2013, 6:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

IMO, Tyvek HomeWrap provides the best combination of durability, weight, waterproof performance and cost. The rigidity can be "processed" out of it. Like all materials used for our purposes, the functional life is finite and will depend on how and where it is used and how it is maintained.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 06 2014, 9:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Tyvek is rated very poorly in water resistance - 500 or so whereas most commercial tent flies are rated 1300 - 1500. This is published on their website somewhere - not that I could find it again. It is NOT WATERPROOF. At all.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 12 2014, 7:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

AND... it is relatively heavy and a bit stiff to easily pack (can roll it).  After a wash cycle in a landromat it will become more pliable.  

You can buy footprint material that is waterproof and relatively strong at some large fabric stores.  Or find the material that is used in the bottom 'tub' of tents on the internet.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 12 2014, 7:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(AlmostThere @ Jan. 06 2014, 9:44 pm)
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Tyvek is rated very poorly in water resistance - 500 or so whereas most commercial tent flies are rated 1300 - 1500.

If your numbers indicate millimeters of hydrostatic head, Tyvek HomeWrap (as opposed to the many other "versions" of Tyvek) has a hydrostatic head of 2500 mm = 250 cm.

http://www2.dupont.com/Tyvek_W....rop.pdf

I have also seen it quoted at 2100 mm ...

http://www.home-siding-info.com/tyvek-advantages.html

1300-1500 mm for rain flies sounds right. As suggested above, I think your Sublite might be made from Tyvek 1443R, 16G or one of the other "soft structure" versions of Tyvek.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 13 2014, 2:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Weigh the home wrap and then the same amount of sil nylon, then try to compress it into the same stuff sack.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 13 2014, 4:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(AlmostThere @ Jan. 13 2014, 2:18 pm)
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Weigh the home wrap and then the same amount of sil nylon, then try to compress it into the same stuff sack.

There's no debating that. It's definitely not as light and packable as silnylon, but it is a lot cheaper and certainly more durable.
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