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Topic: Changing diapers on the trail?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 10 2013, 12:20 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

New dad here-

Any strategies for changing a diaper mid hike? I figure just put down the pack, put a jacket over it and get it done. Am I missing something painfully obvious?

Any other tips for caring for infants in the wild are also appreciated.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 10 2013, 11:55 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'd make an over-sized CCF sit-pad and use it on the ground.  Lightweight, padded, flat and waterproof.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 10 2013, 12:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I carried one of the pads from my LandsEnd diaper bags--very light, the right size, and easy to clean just in case.  Take some serious bags for the used diapers.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 10 2013, 4:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I skipped out on the pads, usually using a mossy or grassy place to take care of business. I also was mean...I made the kids carry their own diapers in and out on the trail, as soon as they were walking the trails. That way food was kept separately from the poo. Just bag it well. As the kids were learning to potty train, I just had them tell me when they needed to go, and we'd head off into the woods to "make a tree grow". My daughter fell over once, scrapping her bum on a rock, so be careful where they squat.

It's less fuss than the standard outhouse at trailheads...my son almost fell in one when he was about 2 1/2. I grabbed him at the collar just in time...his head, hands and feet were the only things still sticking out of the john. Whew! Don't let your guard down there!
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 10 2013, 5:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ah, we have made the dog carry out the dirty diapers before :)

We use cloth diapers and wipes at home now, I have yet to try them on the trail, but I plan to this coming year. I have a wet bag with a zipper that would come in handy too!


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 11 2013, 12:35 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for all the replies.

Once the diaper has been destroyed whats the best way of carrying it? I think I have it narrowed down to a freezer bag inside a dry bad or a device similar to what the GhostBusters used.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 11 2013, 10:17 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've only camped/dayhiked with a child in diapers but I would use the rolls of doggy poop bags -- the "silver" ones (made by 'N2N' or 'Firstrax'.)  They're completely leak-proof, very strong, super lightweight and the best for containing smell, imo.  I use them when backpacking to pack out used toilet paper, something I always do even when I'm not required to.  I can pack out a week's worth of used toilet paper without smell issues.  It also helps to use scented wipes to help mask any smells.  I put them inside a gallon ziplock bag and carry it in an outside pocket of my pack.

If you're going to be out long enough that the used diapers will be too bulky to fit in an outside pocket, you could consider investing in one of the food bags that advertise as been smell-proof that are marketed for food storage in bear country.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 11 2013, 10:40 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I think we just used ziplocks or some such.  Scrape solid matter into a cat hole and the rest isn't too bad.  Cloth diapers are better for pee--just let them dry and reuse--but not so nice for poop, and I never figured out how to predict and just give them a disposable for the one and not the other :)

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 11 2013, 3:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

From my experience with 3 kids? I only use disposables, but that is me.

I have changing kits for the van, for the jogger stroller and for the backpack. At Target and similar, you can pick up lightweight and small changing kits for under $10. It has an ample waterproof changing pad - which yes, you DO want. A jacket is NOT a good idea if you have a blow out!!!!

In it I carry clean diapers, wipes and gallon/quart freezer bags. Each diaper goes in a quart bag, rolled tightly pushing out air, then in a gallon bag. This stops odor quite a bit.

The changing pad also gives you a clean surface for them to sit on or lay on as well for other times.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 12 2013, 7:28 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Sorry, wrong forum

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 25 2013, 7:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have a small lightweight changing pad that came with my diaper bag.  It is nice to have something easy to wipe down if there is any sort of blow-out.  I use ziplocs to contain the diaper, and then place all the used ziplocs in a plastic grocery type bag (Target bags are stronger/bigger than others), then I use a nylon re-usable grocery bag to contain it.  The nylon bag is opaque so no one will know what's inside, and has handles so it's easy to attach to the outside of my pack when hiking out.  The one thing I would say is always take more than you think you need - diapers, wipes, onesies, and ziplocs ;)

Other tips for babes in the wild:

Take your baby out young - get them used to the front carrier/backpack.  Get them used to wearing hats/sunglasses.  Get them used to getting their diaper changed in areas/temps/situations less than ideal.  Then they will likely be happy campers as they get older :)

Bring extra socks and mittens.  Find shoes that will stay on their feet - if they're in a backpack and they kick off their shoes, you won't know unless someone is hiking behind you!

Attach a small hand-held mirror to the shoulder strap of your baby backpack - that way you can see your baby.

Your baby needs a pacifier?  Then be sure to have a pacifier leash - and take an extra one or two.  Needless to say, they get lost/dirty easy.

Leashes are also good for small lightweight toys that you can attach to the backpack to give them something to hold/play with as you're hiking.  My son has a set of plastic "keys" that he likes to rattle as we're walking.  Who needs a bear bell?  lol

They make wipes especially to clean pacifiers - don't need to worry about any residue.

Bring a tarp/poncho - that way you can have a bigger surface for them to sit/roll/crawl in camp.

Travel Boppy pillows are great - for nursing, propping, sleeping, etc.

The first few times I took my son camping I used my down quilt around him at night, but found that once he started to roll he would roll out of it and get cold during the night - so I got him his own sleeping bag - a Kelty Woobie.  It was the only bag I could find that was small enough for a baby.  He loves his Woobie - it's soft inside and the perfect size for him to fit now but also grow into.  He stays snuggled all night long.  

He's slept on both a Thermarest ultralight and a Ridgerest - doesn't seem to have a preference.

The best toy in camp?  A headlamp.  Get them their own because you'll never get yours back, lol

I have all sorts of ideas for nursing while hiking/camping, having done so, so if any new MOMS want some advice, email me rangertarol at yahoo dot com

BTW, nursing is so much easier than bottles - especially in bear country where you'd have to lock up your formula in a canister, or hang it, at night.

That's all I can think of for now...  

So far my kid has 11 bag nights, one for each month of his life :)


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 25 2013, 7:59 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Lisasvoice @ Jan. 10 2013, 4:33 pm)
QUOTE
I skipped out on the pads, usually using a mossy or grassy place to take care of business. I also was mean...I made the kids carry their own diapers in and out on the trail, as soon as they were walking the trails. That way food was kept separately from the poo. Just bag it well. As the kids were learning to potty train, I just had them tell me when they needed to go, and we'd head off into the woods to "make a tree grow". My daughter fell over once, scrapping her bum on a rock, so be careful where they squat.

It's less fuss than the standard outhouse at trailheads...my son almost fell in one when he was about 2 1/2. I grabbed him at the collar just in time...his head, hands and feet were the only things still sticking out of the john. Whew! Don't let your guard down there!

lol!

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 25 2013, 8:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

On the sleeping bag, we started with a down jacket (adult size) we bought for $10 at the thrift store.  We also had a fleece bunting with the bottom all one piece--not separate legs (my MiL made it, as it's hard to buy one that isn't divided for use in car seats), so even if the baby crawled out of his "bag" he was warm.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 26 2013, 12:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(tarol @ Jan. 25 2013, 7:50 pm)
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Your baby needs a pacifier?  Then be sure to have a pacifier leash - and take an extra one or two.  Needless to say, they get lost/dirty easy.

Oh, I remember those pacifier days... my son had one until one trip to the zoo; we were at one of those baby farm animal / petting areas.  He walked up to a goat and offered it his pacifier.  The goat sniffed and took a lick and, of course, my child sort of giggled, dropped it in the dirt, picked it right up and stuck it right back in his mouth.  That was the end of that.  :D

Tarol, your tips are great!  Almost makes me wish I had a little one to practice them on... well, no, not really...


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 26 2013, 8:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Lol, Tiger Fan!  Next time there are babies in my life, I want them to be grandkids, and that had better be a long way off!

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 3:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've decided after thinking about it, I'm going to take my 3 year old and my 2 month old on an overnight this weekend. Just a two mile hike and hubby and dog will come too. It will be a first for the kiddos backpacking. My 3 year old has been car camping since 6 weeks old. I plan to hike with my little guy in a front carrier (he's only 12 lbs or so) and carry my pack also. My 3 year old has a little pack and so does the dog. Should be fun to see if all of us fit in the 3 man tent :)

Will let everyone know how it goes!


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 3:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Have a great time!  We had ours too close together--there were a couple of summers when we had to carry them both :p

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 4:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Van - on my son's second overnighter I carried him in the front pack, and my backpack on my back - he was 20 lbs.  Everything we needed was in the backpack and it was about 35 lbs?  We hiked 3 miles in.  Needless to say, it's definitely doable.  Have fun!

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 4:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TigerFan @ Jan. 26 2013, 12:16 pm)
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(tarol @ Jan. 25 2013, 7:50 pm)
QUOTE
Your baby needs a pacifier?  Then be sure to have a pacifier leash - and take an extra one or two.  Needless to say, they get lost/dirty easy.

Oh, I remember those pacifier days... my son had one until one trip to the zoo; we were at one of those baby farm animal / petting areas.  He walked up to a goat and offered it his pacifier.  The goat sniffed and took a lick and, of course, my child sort of giggled, dropped it in the dirt, picked it right up and stuck it right back in his mouth.  That was the end of that.  :D

Tarol, your tips are great!  Almost makes me wish I had a little one to practice them on... well, no, not really...

lol, yeah, my son offers his pacifier to anything else that has a mouth

Fortunately he's weaning himself off it now, only needs it every now and then.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 9:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RebeccaD @ Jan. 25 2013, 8:54 pm)
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On the sleeping bag, we started with a down jacket (adult size) we bought for $10 at the thrift store.  We also had a fleece bunting with the bottom all one piece--not separate legs (my MiL made it, as it's hard to buy one that isn't divided for use in car seats), so even if the baby crawled out of his "bag" he was warm.

Depends on what temps you're in - we've camped in cold temps, especially the last couple of months, and I was concerned about him not only rolling out of the down quilt, but rolling off the pad.  The sleeping bag keeps him pretty much in one spot - no need for any sort of travel crib.  I think it also helps if you've co-slept beside your baby and they're used to that, so having them in a bag beside you isn't a big change to their sleeping routine.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 10:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You're right about the co-sleeping issue.  I never could sleep with the babies in the same room, let alone in bed with me.  In the tent he'd be right next to me, and we did do some pretty chilly nights, when the fleece and down "bag" both we're necessary.  So I guess I should say he'd be LESS cold.  We'd have him in a regular fleece sleeper, then the bunting bag, then the down jacket.  I don't remember problems with that--only with teething :p

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 29 2013, 4:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yeah, I don't co-sleep with my kids either. I did it with Ford, when he was tiny, but it was to regulate his breathing/temp (being a preemie). I am a restless sleeper. Ford too, man, the boy could kick and punch in his sleeping bag. I was glad when he hit 11 and started sleeping in his own tent ;-)
Walker is doing well in hiking, I can get up to 3 miles out of him now, hopefully more by this summer. He turns 3 end of March. Alistaire turns 1 next week. Two are a lot to handle alone though. This summer will be easier though, with Walker hiking and only Alistaire on me.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 30 2013, 6:47 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

lol, I sleep better with my boy next to me - and he does, too.  For the first few weeks of his life he slept in his bassinett - but then we started co-sleeping and have pretty much done it ever since.  Sometimes he starts off in his own bed (which is in our room) - but he usually ends up in ours.  I think it's more convenient.  If he's hungry or wants a pacifier, he'll start moving a little, and I can tend to him before he (or I) really wakes up.  And I just feel more secure with him beside me, I barely have to move to check on him.  When camping in bear country I very much want him right by my side, and between me and my husband when he comes.  Also it's been very nice this winter since my son is a little heater - he sleeps warm like his Dad :)  There are nights when I get restless, or his Dad, but we're all pretty much used to each other by now.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 30 2013, 10:57 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

With Ford and Walker, they both slept in the room with me till like 2, just a few feet away. With Alistaire less than 2 years apart from Walker, once we hit 6 months old, I moved him in with Walker, which Walker loooovvvveeed. I was that way with Walker, having him close...but got over it and just needed my sleep. He is still close, just a few yards away. But wow do I sleep better now :D Lol.....yeah, I didn't think I would be that way, but it felt right with baby #3 :)

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